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The emerging space technology

Oct 23, 2020
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In the modern world, science and technology are fast-growing things, and as we can see a lot of new space technologies are about to be produced or invented. Which one do you expect the most and which one do you think might be the most useful for humans or for space exploration?
 
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Wolfshadw

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While I don't expect it any time soon, I would like to see the issues with Artificial Gravity (Centripetal Force) be resolved. Just one of many issues facing long term space flight.

-Wolf sends
 
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Oct 23, 2020
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While I don't expect it any time soon, I would like to see the issues with Artificial Gravity (Centripetal Force) be resolved. Just one of many issues facing long term space flight.

-Wolf sends
Artificial Gravity might be useful for futher Mars exploration and colonization missions. Also, it would be useful for Moon exploration too. But it seems to me that it`s not so easy to make Artificial Gravity
 
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Oct 23, 2020
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I liked the way how microsatellites are developing and how they partialy substitute ordinary sats. This is a cheaper and easier way for some missions ordinary sats used to do. Also, we may use microsats bigger number of fields that only emphasis their competence. Satellite technology take part in our everyday live, so we cannot imagine our precent world without sat technology
 
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Dec 29, 2019
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Artificial Gravity might be useful for futher Mars exploration and colonization missions. Also, it would be useful for Moon exploration too. But it seems to me that it`s not so easy to make Artificial Gravity
Bola style paired ships linked by tensile cable - or better, tensile tubes - seems like a solution. Paired tubes would allow them to have air circulation and pressurised access between the two ships/modules. Having an exit to get outside at the centre of rotation or to access anything kept at the centre of mass might be useful too. Should be able to design them to work either as separate ships or tied together.

Acceleration should be possible without cutting rotation or the linkage, using synched drives. As long as it is low acceleration.
 
Oct 23, 2020
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Exploration of our own planet and advancing science from here on Earth before we set off to contaminate the Solar System :) :) :)
I am fond of the technology that is manufactured by small but promising space firm from Scotland. I am staggered by the microsatellites they make and also by some types of rockets like SkyHy. This is a special type of rocket which is called ``hybrid`` rocket.
 
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Mar 4, 2021
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In the modern world, science and technology are fast-growing things, and as we can see a lot of new space technologies are about to be produced or invented. Which one do you expect the most and which one do you think might be the most useful for humans or for space exploration?
I think the Mars Helicopter Ingenuity is the most useful thing for space exploration, because of its aerodynamic design. Its rotors are designed for fly on the thin Mars atmosphere. Cameras and sensors are the most important thing, they provide authonomy.
 
Nov 20, 2019
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In the modern world, science and technology are fast-growing things, and as we can see a lot of new space technologies are about to be produced or invented. Which one do you expect the most and which one do you think might be the most useful for humans or for space exploration?
The UK skylon project is the most promising at present
 
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Oct 23, 2020
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I think the Mars Helicopter Ingenuity is the most useful thing for space exploration, because of its aerodynamic design. Its rotors are designed for fly on the thin Mars atmosphere. Cameras and sensors are the most important thing, they provide authonomy.
Yeah, I liked that too. I was staggered by the Perseverance Mars mission and how advanced it is. I like the idea of such missions ( I mean uncrewed Mars missions ) they are more effective, secure, cheaper, and more effective I think.
 

Catastrophe

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"I like the idea of such missions ( I mean uncrewed Mars missions ) they are more effective, secure, cheaper, and more effective I think."

I am in total agreement with that. Crewed missions increase the complexity (and cost) by at least 100 fold.

Cat :)
 

Atlan0101

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Aug 14, 2020
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"I like the idea of such missions ( I mean uncrewed Mars missions ) they are more effective, secure, cheaper, and more effective I think."

I am in total agreement with that. Crewed missions increase the complexity (and cost) by at least 100 fold.

Cat :)
I saw two panel political cartoon once I've never forgotten. First panel showed a very busy industrial plant with robots looking like they were rushing all over the place among a plethora of other automation. The facility had a fence all around it and a sign, "Fully automated facility. No humans needed."
The second panel showed the same facilities some years or decades later. No movement inside, the facility falling apart, robots and automations generally in pieces, the fence and place in shambles. The same sign is still on the fence: "Fully automated facility. No humans needed" (too expensive).
 
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Atlan0101

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In the modern world, science and technology are fast-growing things, and as we can see a lot of new space technologies are about to be produced or invented. Which one do you expect the most and which one do you think might be the most useful for humans or for space exploration?
In the beginning:
Horizontal take off and landing hyper-sonic air / space planes.
Beginning development of assembly facilitation for ship building (precursors to construction and assembly facilitation in L-point orbits) in space.
Spin gravity stations in Earth and L-point orbits.
Moon and near Earth asteroid mining facilitation..
Beginning commercial industrial facilitation in space; particularly, as I see it, development of farming and, just beyond that, beginning development of space material conversion (via chemistry, energy, and suitable life salting and saturation) to more Earth-like fertile [land] (preparation for more than just humans and a very small select set of other Earth-life in space).
 
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Dec 29, 2019
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I saw two panel political cartoon once I've never forgotten. First panel showed a very busy industrial plant with robots looking like they were rushing all over the place among a plethora of other automation. The facility had a fence all around it and a sign, "Fully automated facility. No humans needed."
The second panel showed the same facilities some years or decades later. No movement inside, the facility falling apart, robots and automations generally in pieces, the fence and place in shambles. The same sign is still on the fence: "Fully automated facility. No humans needed" (too expensive).
I don't see that as relevant; sending things that don't last and need ongoing maintenance (then not provide it) would be foolish, but that need for equipment reliability would be even greater to keep crew alive and safe - which would become the primary focus of mission planning in place of the mission goal the moment the decision to include them was made.

We've had probes do close fly-bys of every planet, including almost-planet Pluto, visit Titan, plus multiple lander visits to Moon and Mars and Venus and a couple of asteroids as well. Apart from the Moon, none of those could even be reached by a crewed mission.

Doing exploration with drones, rovers, robots doesn't exclude humans, rather it makes the very best use of humans - working on Earth with all the resources needed at hand, where they are most productive. The people who designed them will be fully involved. Machines go further, last longer and do it on a budget.

Don't diss the machines - or the people who have made them work so extraordinarily well.
 
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Catastrophe

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"What is the difference between soil and regolith? Soil is a zone of plant growth and is a thin layer of mineral matter that normally contains organic material and is capable of supporting living plants. Regolith is inorganic and lies like a blanket over unfragmented rock. "

Cat :)
 
Feb 11, 2021
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Well, you have already mentioned Ingenuity and Perseverance. I share your opinion and think that drones and uncrewed missions are the most useful emerging space technologies. However, let's no limit our horizons to them. What about Falcon rockets and the concept of reusable rockets at all? Here I also mean the future Starship ( I hope Musk will eventually find a way to land it safely).
 

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