Uncertainty Principle: Position and Velocity: Point and Plane

Aug 14, 2020
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I've read many times one of the bases of Quantum Mechanics is the principle of uncertainty. That if you can position a particle precisely you can never know its velocity with any precision, and if you know its velocity precisely you can never know its position with any precision.

You can actually see or envision, as shape, position and velocity if you try. Position as a point, as points, and velocity as a plane, as planes. Each can define a separation in universe into two or more universes (to infinity). Each can define breakdown in relativity, its division into two or more (to infinity).

Einstein said, "It takes three dimensions to describe a point." A shell of globe or bubble to the 0-point. An infinity of 0-points, an infinity of globed bubbles, an infinity of bubble universes. Relativity breaks down. It divides horizontally (I will say) into countless many point universes. Position is point (0-point).

The universe has been described as flat plane, but it can be and is flat plane on many levels of planed universe , an infinity of flat planes... an infinity of planed universes (depths of 'flat', depths of 'planing', to infinity). Relativity breaks down. It divides vertically up and down -- out and in -- scale (I will say) into countless many planed universes. Velocity is plane (hyper-space).
 
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Apr 5, 2020
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Simple thing: space is a three-dimensional thing and time is one-dimensional. Velocity is simply moving through space. Infinity is a vague concept which is indescribable. It is impossible to prove that universes, except the one we live in, exist.
 
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"After we came out of the church, we stood talking for some time together of Bishop Berkeley's ingenious sophistry to prove the non-existence of matter, and that every thing in the universe is merely ideal. I observed that though his doctrine is not true, it is impossible to refute it. I never shall forget the alacrity with which Johnson answered, striking his foot with mighty force against a large stone, till he rebounded from it -- 'I refute it [thus]'." -- James Boswell, The Life of Samuel Johnson >> the Samuel Johnson Sound Bite Page. ("Berkeley argued against Isaac Newton's notion of absolute space, time, and motion in 'De Motu' (On Motion) published 1721. His arguments were a precursor to the views of Mach and Einstein." -- Wikipedia.)
 
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"From a drop of water a logician could infer the possibility of an Atlantic or a Niagara without having seen or heard of one or the other..." Arthur Canon Doyle, Sherlock Holmes: A Study in Scarlett.
 
Here is the full quotation:

"From a drop of water, a logician could infer the possibility of an Atlantic or a Niagara without having seen or heard of one or the other. So all life is a great chain, the nature of which is known whenever we are shown a single link to it.”

Cat :)
 
In fact, if you want a good place to look (deduction) it is here:

Part I Being a reprint from the reminiscences of JOHN H. WATSON, M.D., late of the Army Medical Department.
Arthur Conan Doyle​
The Science Of Deduction.




"From a drop of water," said the writer, "a logician could infer the possibility of an Atlantic or a Niagara without having seen or heard of one or the other. So all life is a great chain, the nature of which is known whenever we are shown a single link of it. Like all other arts, the Science of Deduction and Analysis is one which can only be acquired by long and patient study nor is life long enough to allow any mortal to attain the highest possible perfection in it. Before turning to those moral and mental aspects of the matter which present the greatest difficulties, let the enquirer begin by mastering more elementary problems. Let him, on meeting a fellow-mortal, learn at a glance to distinguish the history of the man, and the trade or profession to which he belongs. Puerile as such an exercise may seem, it sharpens the faculties of observation, and teaches one where to look and what to look for. By a man's finger nails, by his coat-sleeve, by his boot, by his trouser knees, by the callosities of his forefinger and thumb, by his expression, by his shirt cuffs -- by each of these things a man's calling is plainly revealed. That all united should fail to enlighten the competent enquirer in any case is almost inconceivable."
nt the complete context (deduction) here is a good place to look:
 
Are we then in favour of Laplace's Demon? (courtesy of Wiki)

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In the history of science, Laplace's demon was a notable published articulation of causal determinism on a scientific basis by Pierre-Simon Laplace in 1814.[1] According to determinism, if someone (the demon) knows the precise location and momentum of every atom in the universe, their past and future values for any given time are entailed; they can be calculated from the laws of classical mechanics.[2]
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and thus be able to predict the whole of the future.

Cat :)
 
"Arthur Conan Doyle, in full Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, (born May 22, 1859, Edinburgh, Scotland—died July 7, 1930, Crowborough, Sussex, England), Scottish writer best known for his creation of the detective Sherlock Holmes—one of the most vivid and enduring characters in English fiction." Courtesy Wiki

. . . . . . . . . could certainly have been aware of Laplace and, with a large enough magnifying glass, may well have aspired to improving on star signs as predictive mechanisms. I rest my case.

Cat :)
 
Apr 5, 2020
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In fact, if you want a good place to look (deduction) it is here:

Part I Being a reprint from the reminiscences of JOHN H. WATSON, M.D., late of the Army Medical Department.
Arthur Conan Doyle​
The Science Of Deduction.




"From a drop of water," said the writer, "a logician could infer the possibility of an Atlantic or a Niagara without having seen or heard of one or the other. So all life is a great chain, the nature of which is known whenever we are shown a single link of it. Like all other arts, the Science of Deduction and Analysis is one which can only be acquired by long and patient study nor is life long enough to allow any mortal to attain the highest possible perfection in it. Before turning to those moral and mental aspects of the matter which present the greatest difficulties, let the enquirer begin by mastering more elementary problems. Let him, on meeting a fellow-mortal, learn at a glance to distinguish the history of the man, and the trade or profession to which he belongs. Puerile as such an exercise may seem, it sharpens the faculties of observation, and teaches one where to look and what to look for. By a man's finger nails, by his coat-sleeve, by his boot, by his trouser knees, by the callosities of his forefinger and thumb, by his expression, by his shirt cuffs -- by each of these things a man's calling is plainly revealed. That all united should fail to enlighten the competent enquirer in any case is almost inconceivable."
nt the complete context (deduction) here is a good place to look:
I actually read that just a week ago. :)
 
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