What are we going to do about the Moon?

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BrianSlee

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As I understand it,&nbsp; the moon is moving away from planet earth by some small amount each year.&nbsp; The rotational period for our planet is also getting longer by some small amount as a result.&nbsp; Given the cummulative effects over long periods should&nbsp; we think about changing this?&nbsp; If yes what would it take to get the job done? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p>"I am therefore I think" </p><p>"The only thing "I HAVE TO DO!!" is die, in everything else I have freewill" Brian P. Slee</p> </div>
 
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mooware

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<p>The effect is so small, that the Human race will long be exctinct before we need to worry about it.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p>
 
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nimbus

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>As I understand it,&nbsp; the moon is moving away from planet earth by some small amount each year.&nbsp; The rotational period for our planet is also getting longer by some small amount as a result.&nbsp; Given the cummulative effects over long periods should&nbsp; we think about changing this?&nbsp; If yes what would it take to get the job done? <br /> Posted by BrianSlee</DIV>I'm not sure, but IIRC, the moon's orbit is going to stabilize at some point.<br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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BrianSlee

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I'm not sure, but IIRC, the moon's orbit is going to stabilize at some point. <br />Posted by nimbus</DIV><br /><br />Ok but what will be the effects of differences in solar insolation at that point? i.e. Given a longer day/night cycle how will it effect temperature and weather? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p>"I am therefore I think" </p><p>"The only thing "I HAVE TO DO!!" is die, in everything else I have freewill" Brian P. Slee</p> </div>
 
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robotical

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>As I understand it,&nbsp; the moon is moving away from planet earth by some small amount each year.&nbsp; The rotational period for our planet is also getting longer by some small amount as a result.&nbsp; Given the cummulative effects over long periods should&nbsp; we think about changing this?&nbsp; If yes what would it take to get the job done? <br /> Posted by BrianSlee</DIV></p><p>The Earth's rotation is also steadily slowing down due to tidal drag caused by the moon.&nbsp; The moon's rescession and the Earth's rotational slowing will eventually stop when the Earth becomes tidally locked with the moon (meaning that the Earth will have a day equal to one lunar orbit). </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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BrianSlee

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>The Earth's rotation is also steadily slowing down due to tidal drag caused by the moon.&nbsp; The moon's rescession and the Earth's rotational slowing will eventually stop when the Earth becomes tidally locked with the moon (meaning that the Earth will have a day equal to one lunar orbit). <br />Posted by robotical</DIV><br /><br />So can we increase the velocity and lower the orbit enough to negate that force and maintain the current rotational period? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p>"I am therefore I think" </p><p>"The only thing "I HAVE TO DO!!" is die, in everything else I have freewill" Brian P. Slee</p> </div>
 
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kelvinzero

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>So can we increase the velocity and lower the orbit enough to negate that force and maintain the current rotational period? <br />Posted by BrianSlee</DIV></p><p>I vote we begin using its material to produce solar power satelites. Since there is no limit of sunshine and the process would be exponential, in a few thousand years there will not be any moon, just a vast power collecting and life sustaining&nbsp;surface hugely greater than that of the earth. The maths is pretty simple,&nbsp;assuming we can build that first one profitable satelite.</p>
 
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BrianSlee

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>So can we increase the velocity and lower the orbit enough to negate that force and maintain the current rotational period? <br />Posted by BrianSlee</DIV></p><p>I am not well versed on orbital mechanics and this is nothing more than a brain exercise for me to learn from.&nbsp; So please don't beat me up too badly.&nbsp; I am thinking that the above idea might have some drawbacks, like How close would we have to be together to accomplish this and would it create a permanent shadow over a large section of planet? Tidal forces&nbsp; would be totally different (which have a huge impact on the marine environment, and estuarial systems and....)etc......</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p>"I am therefore I think" </p><p>"The only thing "I HAVE TO DO!!" is die, in everything else I have freewill" Brian P. Slee</p> </div>
 
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BrianSlee

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I vote we begin using its material to produce solar power satelites. Since there is no limit of sunshine and the process would be exponential, in a few thousand years there will not be any moon, just a vast power collecting and life sustaining&nbsp;surface hugely greater than that of the earth. The maths is pretty simple,&nbsp;assuming we can build that first one profitable satelite. <br />Posted by kelvinzero</DIV><br /><br />How do we maintain the positive influences of the moon if we do that? i.e. tides <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p>"I am therefore I think" </p><p>"The only thing "I HAVE TO DO!!" is die, in everything else I have freewill" Brian P. Slee</p> </div>
 
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derekmcd

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>As I understand it,&nbsp; the moon is moving away from planet earth by some small amount each year.&nbsp; The rotational period for our planet is also getting longer by some small amount as a result.&nbsp; Given the cummulative effects over long periods should&nbsp; we think about changing this?&nbsp; If yes what would it take to get the job done? <br /> Posted by BrianSlee</DIV></p><p>This process is so slow and gradual, everything will naturally adjust and find balance.&nbsp; Earth has other climate cycles that are far more drastic than anything the tidal effects can throw at us.&nbsp; And, long term, the sun going red giant present a far larger issue to deal with. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div> </div><br /><div><span style="color:#0000ff" class="Apple-style-span">"If something's hard to do, then it's not worth doing." - Homer Simpson</span></div> </div>
 
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kelvinzero

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>How do we maintain the positive influences of the moon if we do that? i.e. tides <br />Posted by BrianSlee</DIV></p><p>With the material of the moon alone we could build a swarm of&nbsp;colonies with atleast thousands of times the surface area of the earth. We could&nbsp;duplicate not only every habitat currently on earth but also reconstruct every habitat from our prehistory and develop entirely new ones. </p><p>With that much solar power you could generate tides manually. I just doubt it would be a priority. There are better ways to live than planets. Living on a planet in the future would be sort of like moving to california and choosing to live at the bottom of&nbsp;a well :)</p><p>Im not saying that dismantling the earth is a plan. People tend to have an emotional attachment to it and would currently distrust the alternatives. However in thousands of years, when there are thousands of times&nbsp;more people off earth than on it, such a decision could become not merely natural but inevitable.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p>
 
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