Question Boeings Starliner, early fuel burn

Dec 20, 2019
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There were very high winds today on the space coast. The flight flew into these high gusty winds. Did the sensors request the extra fuel to over come the very high winds thereby causing too much fuel burn (more than anticipated/designed) during the early part of the flight when it was most needed? At low intial speeds wouldn't the rocket need the extra fuel burn to over come high winds and stay on course? Don't ignore what might be considered obvious. My first post, hope it goes to the right place for a verified answer.
 
Dec 22, 2019
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Well, having absolutely no knowledge on a subject has never kept me from having an opinion:
Wouldn’t winds strong enough to require fuel compensation be outside the launch criteria?
 
Jan 22, 2020
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There were very high winds today on the space coast. The flight flew into these high gusty winds. Did the sensors request the extra fuel to over come the very high winds thereby causing too much fuel burn (more than anticipated/designed) during the early part of the flight when it was most needed? At low intial speeds wouldn't the rocket need the extra fuel burn to over come high winds and stay on course? Don't ignore what might be considered obvious. My first post, hope it goes to the right place for a verified answer.
I do not think the launch conditions have any effect on this issue. The problem was with the second stage not the booster.
 
Dec 20, 2019
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The problem was clearly identified as a programming problem and not a mechanical problem. Or so they say. Boeing's reputation for telling the truth isn't so great right now.
 

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