Coolest Brown Dwarf Yet Found

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MeteorWayne

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<p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10pt;font-family:Arial">Brown dwarfs are the oddballs of the cosmos, more massive than planets but not heavy enough to generate the thermonuclear fusion that powers real stars. Now astronomers have found the coldest brown dwarf to date.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10pt;font-family:Arial">The failed star might represent a new class of objects that are a missing link between planets and stars.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10pt;font-family:Arial">The cold brown dwarf floats freely in space, not bound to a star. Its mass is somewhere between 15 and 30 times that of Jupiter. And it is about 660 degrees Fahrenheit (350 Celsius), cooler than any other known object in its class.</span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10pt;font-family:Arial">The surface of the sun is about 11,000 degrees F (6,000 degrees C). <span style="color:black">The temperature at the top of Jupiter's clouds is about -230 degrees F (-145 degrees C), though at its core the mercury soars to 43,000 degrees F (24,000 degrees C).</span></span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10pt;color:black;font-family:Arial">The brown dwarf, named CFBDS J005910.83-011401.3, is about 40 light-years from our solar system. It was found by an international team using the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and Gemini North Telescope, both located in Hawaii, and the a European Southern Observatory telescope in Chile. </span></p><p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-size:10pt;color:black;font-family:Arial">http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/080410-cold-brown-dwarf.html</span></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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thebigcat

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Sorry, but I saw the words "Coolest Brown Dwarf" and I was reminded of "Diet Cola" in the Bacardi and Cola commercials. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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pyoko

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<p>I have two questions:</p><p>- There is no fusion in the star at all? Or some, generating light and heat. Would it still be blinding to look at?</p><p>- When you say 'sun', did you mean the brown dwarf, or the Sun (Sol)?</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p> </p><p><span style="color:#ff9900" class="Apple-style-span">-pyoko</span> <span style="color:#333333" class="Apple-style-span">the</span> <span style="color:#339966" class="Apple-style-span">duck </span></p><p><span style="color:#339966" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="color:#808080;font-style:italic" class="Apple-style-span">It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.</span></span></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I have two questions:- There is no fusion in the star at all? Or some, generating light and heat. Would it still be blinding to look at?- When you say 'sun', did you mean the brown dwarf, or the Sun (Sol)? <br />Posted by pyoko</DIV></p><p>If there ever was any Deuterium fusion (marginally large enough object)it's likely ended by now.</p><p>The heat remaining is from gravitational contraction</p><p><br /><span style="font-size:10pt;font-family:Arial">The surface of the sun is about 11,000 degrees F (6,000 degrees C). Refers tou our sun.</span></p><p><span style="font-size:10pt;font-family:Arial">Info on the brown dwarf is in the next paragraph</span></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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pyoko

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So it would look something like a large Jupiter, and one could gaze upon it without burning out the retinas. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p> </p><p><span style="color:#ff9900" class="Apple-style-span">-pyoko</span> <span style="color:#333333" class="Apple-style-span">the</span> <span style="color:#339966" class="Apple-style-span">duck </span></p><p><span style="color:#339966" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="color:#808080;font-style:italic" class="Apple-style-span">It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.</span></span></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>So it would look something like a large Jupiter, and one could gaze upon it without burning out the retinas. <br />Posted by pyoko</DIV></p><p>Yes 660 F is just a bit hotter than your oven can get. It would not be glowing at all in visible light, but would be visible in infrared. Just as Jupier would be drak, if not for reflected sunlight.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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pyoko

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If they are downgrading planets to dwarf-planets, perhaps they should downgrade this stars' "star' status to gas giant. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p> </p><p><span style="color:#ff9900" class="Apple-style-span">-pyoko</span> <span style="color:#333333" class="Apple-style-span">the</span> <span style="color:#339966" class="Apple-style-span">duck </span></p><p><span style="color:#339966" class="Apple-style-span"><span style="color:#808080;font-style:italic" class="Apple-style-span">It is by will alone I set my mind in motion.</span></span></p> </div>
 
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PistolPete

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>If they are downgrading planets to dwarf-planets, perhaps they should downgrade this stars' "star' status to gas giant. <br /> Posted by pyoko</DIV><br />That's why they are called brown dwarves.&nbsp; They are too small to fit the classical definition of stars as there is no hydrogen fusion via the proton-proton chain method in the core, yet they are too large (and too hot) to be just large sacks of gas like Jupiter and Saturn. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><em>So, again we are defeated. This victory belongs to the farmers, not us.</em></p><p><strong>-Kambei Shimada from the movie Seven Samurai</strong></p> </div>
 
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thebigcat

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<p>Okay, I guess nobody saw that commercial.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Oh well.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Interesting subject though. Some time back I started a thread on the subject because I had heard only sketchy information on "objects in interstellar space larger than planets and smaller than stars". Turns out that it was brown dwarf stars which I was asking about.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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neilsox

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>That's why they are called brown dwarves.&nbsp; They are too small to fit the classical definition of stars as there is no hydrogen fusion via the proton-proton chain method in the core, yet they are too large (and too hot) to be just large sacks of gas like Jupiter and Saturn. <br />Posted by PistolPete</DIV><br />We are finding hotter than Jupiter brown dwarfs as these are easier to find than larger (but colder)&nbsp;than Jupiter bodies which may number in the billions in our galaxy.&nbsp;&nbsp; Neil
 
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3488

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'><font color="#ff0000">We are finding hotter than Jupiter brown dwarfs as these are easier to find than larger (but colder)&nbsp;than Jupiter bodies which may number in the billions in our galaxy.&nbsp;&nbsp; Neil <br />Posted by neilsox</font></DIV></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>I would suspect that to be the case, not to mention, even more Saturn, Uranus & Neptune massed rogues.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>&nbsp;I reckon intersteller & perhaps intergalactic&nbsp;space has a large population of rogue planets, comets & asteroids & the brown dwarves are the top of the chain of said rogue bodies.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Andrew Brown.</strong></font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I would suspect that to be the case, not to mention, even more Saturn, Uranus & Neptune massed rogues.&nbsp;I reckon intersteller & perhaps intergalactic&nbsp;space has a large population of rogue planets, comets & asteroids & the brown dwarves are the top of the chain of said rogue bodies.Andrew Brown. <br />Posted by 3488</DIV></p><p>I think that probably depends of how you define "a large population" <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-laughing.gif" border="0" alt="Laughing" title="Laughing" /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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