Does someone have images of the Endeavour damage?

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willpittenger

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<blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>There was not a trivial method, as you seem to be implying, to see the damage site.<p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br />Well, if someone had a spacesuit along (other than the orange suits), an astronaut could have gone outside. The orbiter would then turn over with the astronaut just floating there. He or she would then get back in the same way. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <hr style="margin-top:0.5em;margin-bottom:0.5em" />Will Pittenger<hr style="margin-top:0.5em;margin-bottom:0.5em" />Add this user box to your Wikipedia User Page to show your support for the SDC forums: <div style="margin-left:1em">{{User:Will Pittenger/User Boxes/Space.com Account}}</div> </div>
 
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usn_skwerl

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Well, if someone had a spacesuit along (other than the orange suits), an astronaut could have gone outside. The orbiter would then turn over with the astronaut just floating there. He or she would then get back in the same way. <p><hr /><br /><br />which would make for some really spectacular news/nasa tv coverage. the MMU was great, but to see an uncontrolled human satellite would not only be nerve-wracking, but a hell of an adrenaline rush for all...something that all of us would enjoy (wheres Story musgrave when ya need him!!?).....until they saw what they dreaded.....</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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jimfromnsf

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"Well, if someone had a spacesuit along (other than the orange suits), an astronaut could have gone outside. The orbiter would then turn over with the astronaut just floating there. He or she would then get back in the same way."<br /><br />Two EVA suits fly on every mission. How, ever your proposal is undoable. The EVA astronaut would have no control over which way he is pointing or looking. One little bump and he goes off in another direction. Also manuvering the shuttle around him is undoable.
 
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usn_skwerl

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i think it was s_g that said a few weeks back, in another thread that the MMU was worse to maneuver than just moving the shuttle....delta V couldnt be that scary for the EVA guy, as long he doesnt have a muscle spasm. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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usn_skwerl

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ok, great....<br /><br />why? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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jimfromnsf

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There is no way for the astronaut to control his movements. The MMU does not fly any more and SAFER's are on the station
 
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usn_skwerl

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so if i understand you correctly, its impossible, because the shuttle cant maneuver around so that its 15x60 ft box of a cargo bay can catch the drifting astronaut, who has comm with the shuttle (who can inform him of distance remaining) hes flying with? o_O <br /><br />edit: im totally aware that the last time the MMU was used was in the mid 80's. McCandless, IIRC. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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jimfromnsf

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No, once the astronaut let's go of the shuttle, he will have no control of his attitude and no matter how carefully he is, he will impart some motion to himself and will slowly tumble. He won't be able to keep the shuttle in his sight . The rest doesn't matter but I goe thru the remaining steps. The shuttle would have to back away from the astronaut so that it can rotate without hitting him. Once the shuttle does the rotation, it will lose sight of the astronaut and have no references. Verbal commands from the astro are not enough. The shuttle would have to place the spot on the bottom within a few feet of the astro. Again, no references for the pilot.
 
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Leovinus

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The size of the hole doesn't matter. Suppose someone took a very tiny blowtorch and applied it to your palm. I thiink you'd feel it. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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usn_skwerl

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i dont think that may be the right way to look at it...from what im learning from this thread, its more of dispersing the heat from reentry. my understanding seems to be that the gouge is sort of..."skipped" (for lack of a better term) over by the heat to some extent. eddies in the heated airflow swirl around within the gouged area...<br /><br />additionally, maybe Bernoulli's principle plays a part in this? (low pressure = high velocity = less airflow in the gouge) would that be a part of the equation? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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3488

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It would have been extremely low pressure over the gouge, hence Endeavour was <br />not in any real danger.<br /><br />What we do not have data on, is how the superheated gasses actually moved around or<br />over the gouge.<br /><br />What ever, it is a chance that should not be repeated. It must be repaired.<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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usn_skwerl

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jim, i dont think there would be much of an issue with recovering the floating astronaut, there are enough windows to spot him, or for him to spot the shuttle, even going so far as improving the odds just by temprarily closing one of the doors. (not necessarily all the way due to the rads) but im not go too deep.<br /><br />...but i do have a quick question about the hypothetical uncontrolled EVA....dont the suits have tether clips? if an astronaut is to peek over the side of the door, cant he clip onto the rails along the side of the bay? are the tethers long enough?<br /><br />if columbia had been informed about the possible damage, was there no way for them to at least peek over the edge of the door to confirm? tethers, ropes, belts or anything? they can ghetto rig a co2 scrubber on apollo 13 with little more than duct tape, and STS cant move 25 feet from an airlock? surely if they had known it was a possibility they were wounded they had at least some option to confirm visually? IIRC they didnt have enough fuel to get up to the ISS? (its been a while since reading CAIB) <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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jimfromnsf

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The point isn't recovering the astronaut, the point is that he can't do anything useful. He can't spot the shuttle to look at the tile if his back is to the shuttle. There is no way for him to turn around.<br /><br />Leading edge of the wing is different than the center of the belly
 
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strandedonearth

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An object moving through air creates a boundary layer of slower-moving air next to the surface. It is this boundary layer that helped to prevent hot gases from blasting into the hole in the TPS. This is a well-known aerodynamic phenomenon.
 
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rocketwatcher2001

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<font color="yellow">maybe Bernoulli's principle plays a part in this? (low pressure = high velocity = less airflow in the gouge) would that be a part of the equation? </font><br /><br />At supersonic speeds, and I'm assuming hypersonic also, but i have no experiance in hypersonic aerodynamics, Bernoulli's priciple doesn't apply. Lift, and other aerodynamic fores are considered to be impulse rather than reactionary. Please let me explain, In subsonic air, an airfoil works by accelerating the air at a higher speed over one side of the surface than the other, causing a pressure differential we call "lift" The shape of the airfoil is called "camber", which is mostly asymetrical for a wing and horizontal stablizer, and symetrical for a vertical stablizer. The differential pressures caused by the uneven acceleration cause a "reaction" to take place, and that reaction is called lift. In subsonic air, you can have the other type of aerodynamic form of lift, called impuse lift. You can imagine a plain old piece of plywood with no camber flying through the air. If you rotate the plywood to give it an angle of attack you would get lift, but that comes for from Newton's laws of impulse. Most wings use a combination of impulse and reaction types of lift.<br /><br />In supersonic air, reactions work differently, because of compressblity, so most supersonic airfoils are designed to take advantage of impusle type lift, because reactionary lift works very differently. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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willpittenger

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Your analogy is flawed. The blowtorch would be nowhere near your hand and not as hot as you expect. First the "torch" was blowing across the hole -- not into it. Second, between the torch and the metal was the remaining TPS. The previously mentioned boundary layer inhabits that hole and won't leave readily. Third, between the tiles and the metal was an undamaged layer of TPS (felt?). Fourth, under that was the metal, but it was protecting itself. The damage was at the junction of two structural pieces that would both bleed heat from the hole. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <hr style="margin-top:0.5em;margin-bottom:0.5em" />Will Pittenger<hr style="margin-top:0.5em;margin-bottom:0.5em" />Add this user box to your Wikipedia User Page to show your support for the SDC forums: <div style="margin-left:1em">{{User:Will Pittenger/User Boxes/Space.com Account}}</div> </div>
 
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para3

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For Holy Shuttle Landing-we should have a contest to guess how many holes are in the shuttle tiles. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong><font size="3" color="#99cc00">.....Shuttle me up before I get tooooooooo old and feeble.....</font></strong></p><p><strong></strong></p><p><strong><font size="4" color="#ff6600">---Happiness is winning a huge lottery--- </font></strong></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Why don't you read this thread?<br /><br />All the memory refreshing you could need is contained here. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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