Jupiter, now THREE Red Spots.

Status
Not open for further replies.
3

3488

Guest
<p><strong><font size="2">Jupiter is now sporting three red spots, The Great Red Spot, Red Spot Junior & now The Little Red Spot.</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">Jupiter clearly appears to be undergoing global climate change, as the equatorial regions appear to be getting warmer, whilst the poles are getting colder. The mid latitudes as a result are getting stormier as the greater heat transfer between equator & poles increases turbulence.</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">Jupiter will be worth keeping a good eye on during the Summer & Autumn by amateur astronomers, as Jupiter could display some interesting weather.</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">Below Hubble Space Telescope image of the three red spots on: Saturday 10th May 2008. Also what appears to be a solitary gigantic thunderhead near the top of the frame, north of the Great Red Spot, as a bright white spot. The two white ovals to the south are quite impressive themselves.</font></strong></p><p><font size="2" color="#000080"><strong>http://img179.imageshack.us/my.php?image=jupiterthirdredspot10thcu1.jpg</strong></font><br /><img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/9/12/39299c9f-18d3-43df-9c4b-3a4a9e31590e.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Andrew Brown.</strong></font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
D

DrRocket

Guest
<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Jupiter is now sporting three red spots, The Great Red Spot, Red Spot Junior & now The Little Red Spot.Jupiter clearly appears to be undergoing global climate change, as the equatorial regions appear to be getting warmer, whilst the poles are getting colder. The mid latitudes as a result are getting stormier as the greater heat transfer between equator & poles increases turbulence.Jupiter will be worth keeping a good eye on during the Summer & Autumn by amateur astronomers, as Jupiter could display some interesting weather.Below Hubble Space Telescope image of the three red spots on: Saturday 10th May 2008. Also what appears to be a solitary gigantic thunderhead near the top of the frame, north of the Great Red Spot, as a bright white spot. The two white ovals to the south are quite impressive themselves.http://img179.imageshack.us/my.php?image=jupiterthirdredspot10thcu1.jpgAndrew Brown. <br />Posted by 3488</DIV><br /><br />That's a neat picture but the site seems a bit spamy.&nbsp; Here is a link to the same picture&nbsp;on the NASA site.</p><p>http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2008/23/</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
3

3488

Guest
<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'><font color="#ff0000">That's a neat picture but the site seems a bit spamy.&nbsp; Here is a link to the same picture&nbsp;on the NASA site.http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2008/23/ <br />Posted by DrRocket</font></DIV></p><p><strong><font size="2">Cheers DrRocket.</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">Pluck cannot host full sized & resolution images, so I have been forced to use an image hosting site, which unfortunately is reliant on advertising to exist. So yes, it does come over as a bit spammy, but I have no choice, if I am going to post decent images here.</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">I did not see the Hubble site earlier, but thanks for posting a link to it.</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">Hopefully the HST will monitor Jupiter's weather & Io's volcanoes on a regular basis during the Summer & Autumn this year.</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">Below 'map' of Jupiter on Saturday 10th May 2008. Hubble Space Telescope.</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2" color="#000080">http://img371.imageshack.us/my.php?image=jupitermap10may2008hstdt6.jpg</font></strong><br /><img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/1/15/d18f5942-bc2e-47b0-af76-7acf5119c0c3.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></p><p>http://img371.imageshack.us/my.php?image=jupitermap10may2008hstdt6.jpg</p><p><strong><font size="2">Andrew Brown.</font></strong></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
S

silylene old

Guest
<p>Well, the picture is on APOD too, and they post it in big beautiful detail: http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html</p><p>&nbsp;The funny thing is that the global warming denialists have sized on this clause in the explanation on APOD&nbsp; (<font color="#ff0000">in red</font>):&nbsp; I am sure that the APOD writers never intended that, and are probably kicking themselves over their mistake in not wording this clause more restrictively:</p><p><font color="#000080"><strong>Explanation: </strong>For about 300 years Jupiter's banded atmosphere has shown a remarkable feature to </font><font color="#000080">telescopic viewers</font><font color="#000080">, a large swirling storm system known as </font><font color="#000080">The Great Red Spot</font><font color="#000080">. In </font><font color="#000080">2006, another red</font><font color="#000080"> storm system appeared, actually seen to form as smaller whitish oval-shaped storms merged and then developed the curious reddish hue. </font><font color="#000080">Now, Jupiter has</font><font color="#000080"> a third red spot, again produced from a smaller whitish storm. All three are seen </font><font color="#000080">in this image</font><font color="#000080"> made from data recorded on May 9 and 10 with the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field and </font><font color="#000080">Planetary Camera 2</font><font color="#000080">. The spots extend above the surrounding clouds and their </font><font color="#000080">red color</font><font color="#000080"> may be due to deeper material dredged up by the storms and exposed to ultraviolet light, but the exact chemical process is still unknown. </font><font color="#000080">For scale</font><font color="#000080">, the Great Red Spot has almost twice the diameter </font><font color="#000080">of planet</font><font color="#000080"> Earth, making both new spots less than one Earth-diameter across. The newest red spot is on the far left (west), along the same band of clouds as the Great Red Spot and is drifting toward it. If the motion continues, the new spot will encounter the much larger storm system in August. Jupiter's recent outbreak of red spots </font><font color="#ff0000">is likely related to large scale </font><font color="#ff0000">climate change</font><font color="#000080"><font color="#ff0000"> as the gas giant planet is getting warmer near the equator</font>.</font> </p><p>The Jupiter climate change&nbsp;hypothesis is very interesting to read too: http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/jupiter_spots_040421.html</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature" align="center"><em><font color="#0000ff">- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -</font></em> </div><div class="Discussion_UserSignature" align="center"><font color="#0000ff"><em>I really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function.</em></font> </div> </div>
 
E

eburacum45

Guest
<p>I love those close-up pic of unusual weather on Jupiter; they make good textures for fictional gas giants in Celestia</p><p>http://img210.imageshack.us/img210/1156/gasgiantmp6.jpg</p><p>Many of the features on Jupiter seem to be caused by Kelvin-Helmoltz waves, which are formed between layers of fluid of different density (and are quite easy to make using Gimp tools for a texture)...</p><p>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kelvin%E2%80%93Helmholtz_instability</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>---------------------------------------------------------------</p><p>http://orionsarm.com  http://thestarlark.blogspot.com/</p> </div>
 
S

Swampcat

Guest
Thanks for the image guys. New desktop material. <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-cool.gif" border="0" alt="Cool" title="Cool" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font size="3" color="#ff9900"><p><font size="1" color="#993300"><strong><em>------------------------------------------------------------------- </em></strong></font></p><p><font size="1" color="#993300"><strong><em>"I hold it that a little rebellion now and then is a good thing, and as necessary in the political world as storms in the physical. Unsuccessful rebellions, indeed, generally establish the encroachments on the rights of the people which have produced them. An observation of this truth should render honest republican governors so mild in their punishment of rebellions as not to discourage them too much. It is a medicine necessary for the sound health of government."</em></strong></font></p><p><font size="1" color="#993300"><strong>Thomas Jefferson</strong></font></p></font> </div>
 
3

3488

Guest
<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'><font color="#ff0000">Thanks for the image guys. New desktop material. <br />Posted by Swampcat</font></DIV></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Cheers Guys for your input. </strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><font size="1">Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'></font><font size="1" color="#ff0000">Well, the picture is on APOD too, and they post it in big beautiful detail: http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html </font></font><font size="2"><font size="1" color="#ff0000">Posted by silylene<font color="#000000"></DIV></font></font></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>I have seen the APOD now&nbsp;as suggested by silylene & have from that image, cropped, enlarged&nbsp;& enhanced the three spots themselves. The Great Red Spot & Red Spot Junior have revealed further detail, whilst the Little Red Spot, appears even more red (strange).</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000080"><strong>http://img397.imageshack.us/my.php?image=jupiter3redspotshstxy7.jpg</strong></font><br /><img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/2/7/7293ba52-efb8-4793-b73b-a40158cf7c2e.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Andrew Brown.</strong></font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY