Lectures Documentaries & Books (Science, Physics, Cosmology)

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BoJangles2

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Lectures Documentaries & Books (Science, Physics, and Cosmology) Now Working!!!!

Here are some lectures documentaries and books people might find interesting, there is some great stuff here, in particular if you’re looking to learn physics try the Physics 10 (Phsycis for Future Presidents) by Richard A. Muller, this guy teaches in a very palatable way.

I’ve had to recreate this thread due to the lack of formatting in the old one and the inability to restart my old account. I added DrRockets book list and the resources posted by Saiph.

If you have anything at all to add, or just feel like plugging or commenting on something you have seen, Post away

Please help support this thread by reporting any broken links, Missing resources, or incorrect fields

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New Stuff

Posted by Jeters_Boy in Expanding universe

Lecture : A Universe From Nothing (2009)
The Richard Dawkins Foundation for Reason and Science, Lawrence Krauss
Introduction, 01:04:52

Lawrence Krauss gives a talk on our current picture of the universe, how it will end, and how it could have come from nothing. Krauss is the author of many bestselling books on Physics and Cosmology, including "The Physics of Star Trek."

A Universe From Nothing
 
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BoJangles2

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Re: Lectures Documentaries & Books ( Now Working )

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Documentaries

Documentary : Parrots the Universe and Everything (2001)
USCB, Douglas Adams
Introduction, 01:27:00

Douglas Adams was the best-selling British author and satirist who created The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. In this talk at UCSB recorded shortly before his death, Adams shares hilarious accounts of some of the apparently absurd lifestyles of the world's creatures, and gleans from them extraordinary perceptions about the future of humanity.

Parrots the Universe and Everything

Documentary : Queerer Than We Suppose (2005)
Oxford University, Richard Dawkins
Introduction, 00:22:00

Richard Dawkins is Oxford University's "Professor for the Public Understanding of Science." Author of the landmark 1976 book, The Selfish Gene, he's a brilliant (and trenchant) evangelist for Darwin's ideas. In this talk, titled, "Queerer Than We Suppose: The strangeness of science," he suggests that the true nature of the universe eludes us, because the human mind evolved only to understand the "middle-sized" world we can observe.

The Strangeness of Science

Documentary : The Death of the Dinosaurs - 27 Years Later (2006)
Berkeley, Richard Muller
Introduction, 00:55:00

Rich Muller, a Berkeley Lab physicist, discusses Nobel laureate Luis Alvarez and colleagues' 1979 discovery that an asteroid impact killed the dinosaurs. He also discusses what scientists have learned in the subsequent 27 years. Alvarez's team detected unusual amounts of iridium in sedimentary layers. They attributed the excess iridium to an impact from a large asteroid. Series: "Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Summer Lecture Series"

The Death of the Dinosaurs: 27 Years Later

Documentary : Journey to the Edge of the Universe (2008)
Discovery, Unknown
Introduction, 01:30:00

In one single, epic camera move we journey from Earth's surface to the outermost reaches of the universe on a grand tour of the cosmos, to explore newborn stars, distant planets, black holes and beyond

Journey to the Edge of the Universe

Documentary : Supermassive Black Holes (2000)
BBC, Unknown
Introduction, 00:45:00

In June 2000, astronomers made an extraordinary discovery. One that promises to solve one of the biggest problems in cosmology - how and why galaxies are created. Incredibly, the answer involves the most weird, destructive and terrifying objects in the Universe - supermassive black holes. Scientists are beginning to believe that these forces of pure destruction actually help trigger the birth of galaxies and therefore are at the heart of the creation of stars, planets and all life.

Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4 Part 5

Documentary : Space (2006)
BBC, Sam Neil
Introduction, 03:00:00

In a stroke of inspired casting Jurassic Park's Sam Neill (no stranger to acting alongside CGI effects) is our earthbound anchor, and he takes the viewer on journeys across the universe in each half-hour segment, thanks to some nifty special effects. Like Carl Sagan's pioneering Cosmos from 1980, Space delves in to the mysteries of how stars and planets were created; but unlike Sagan's visionary and optimistic view of cosmic wonders, Space is astronomy for the Age of Anxiety, revealing with terrifying clarity and in graphic detail how fortunate we are to exist at all, and how it could all end at any moment as a result of space-bound monsters like rogue comets and asteroids that might crash into our planet; or, the worst horror of the universe, wandering black holes that could tear our sun apart.

Star Stuff Part 1 Part 2 Part 3
Staying Alive Part 1 Part 2 Part 3
Black Holes Part 1 Part 2 Part 3
Are We Alone Part 1 Part 2 Part 3
New Worlds Part 1 Part 2 Part 3
Boldly Go Part 1 Part 2 Part 3

Documentary : Atom (2008)
BBC, Jim Al-Khalili
Introduction, 03:00:00

In this three-part documentary series, Professor Jim Al-Khalili tells the story of one of the greatest scientific discoveries ever: that the material world is made up of atoms. “The Clash of the Titans” takes us from the discovery of the atom to the development of quantum mechanics. “The Key to the Cosmos” tackles world-changing discoveries such as radioactivity, the Atom Bomb and the Big Bang, and tries to answer the biggest questions of all - why are we here and how were we made? “The Illusion of Reality” discovers that there might be parallel universes in which different versions of us exist, and finds out that empty space isn’t empty at all, but seething with activity.

The Clash of the Titans
The Key to the Cosmos
The Illusion of Reality

Documentary : The Cosmos (1980-)
Unknown, Carl Sagan
Introduction, Long

Astronomer Dr. Carl Sagan is host and narrator of this 13-hour series that originally aired on Public Broadcasting Stations in the United States. Dr. Sagan describes the universe in a way that appeals to a mass audience, by using Earth as a reference point, by speaking in terms intelligible to non-scientific people, by relating the exploration of space to that of the Earth by pioneers of old, and by citing such Earth legends as the Library of Alexandria as metaphors for space-related future events.

The Shores of the Cosmic Ocean
One Voice in the Cosmic Fugue
Blues for a Red Planet
Traveller's Tales
The Backbone of Night
Journeys in Space and Time
The Lives of Stars
The Edge of Forever
Encyclopaedia Galatica
Who Speaks for Earth

Documentary : Most of our Universe is Missing (2006)
BBC, Speaker : Unknown
Introduction, 00:48:00

The truth is, we can only account for a tiny percentage of our universe - around 4%. So what is the remaining 96% made of? The current favoured thinking relies on the existence of dark matter: a substance you can't see, made of particles that so far exist only on paper, shaped and formed by a theoretical force that has never been measured. Yet billions of dollars is being spent in trying to find it. And the stakes are high; whoever finds the elusive dark stuff is virtually guaranteed a Nobel Prize, and could well have paved the way for the biggest prize of all - the elusive 'theory of everything'. But not everyone agrees. Horizon meets the warring factions, from Princeton Professors to a 'punk cosmologist', and gets the story first-hand

Most of our Universe is missing

Documentary : The Death Star (2001)
BBC, Unknown
Introduction, Unknown

The truth is, we can only account for a tiny percentage of our universe - around 4%. So what is the remaining 96% made of? The current favoured thinking relies on the existence of dark matter: a substance you can't see made of particles that so far exist only on paper, shaped and formed by a theoretical force that has never been measured. Yet billions of dollars is being spent in trying to find it. And the stakes are high; whoever finds the elusive dark stuff is virtually guaranteed a Nobel Prize, and could well have paved the way for the biggest prize of all - the elusive 'theory of everything'. But not everyone agrees. Horizon meets the warring factions, from Princeton Professors to a 'punk cosmologist', and gets the story first-hand

The death star

Documentary : The Big Bang (2008)
BBC, Jim Khalili
Introduction, 00:59:00

The remarkable idea that our universe simply began from nothing has not always been accepted with the conviction it is today and, from fiercely disputed leftfield beginnings, took the best part of the 20th century to emerge as the triumphant explanation of how the universe began. Using curious horn-shaped antennas, U-2 spy planes, satellites and particle accelerators, scientists have slowly pieced together the cosmological jigsaw, and this documentary charts the overwhelming evidence for a universe created by a Big Bang.

The Big Bang

Documentary : The Hawking Paradox (2005)
BBC, Unknown
Introduction, 00:49:00

Stephen Hawking is the most famous scientist on the planet. His popular science book 'A Brief History of Time' was a publishing sensation, staying at the top of the bestseller lists longer than any other book in recent history. But behind the public face lies an argument that has been raging for almost 30 years.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Documentary : Time Trip (2003)
BBC, Unknown
Introduction, 00:49:00

According to Professor Paul Davies "Scientists have no doubt whatever that it is possible to build a time machine to visit the future". Since the publication of Einstein’s Special Theory of Relativity in 1905, few, if any, scientists would dispute that time travel to the future is perfectly possible

Time trip

Documentary : The Moon (2007)
BBC, Unknown
Introduction, 00:57:00

A fascinating documentary by the BBC looking at the human race's relationship with the Moon, starting with elaborate rock formations to map its movements - through to the Apollo missions which explored it. The documentary also looks at other planet's moons, such as Jupiter's Titan and ice covered Europa, which is the best bet for life outside of Earth in the Solar System. It ends with the future plans of NASA to build a habitat on the moon, along with other organisations which also plan to land & live on our closest celestial body.

The Moon

Documentary : Space Tourists (2006)
BBC, Unknown
Introduction, 00:48:00

Over 40 years ago man first went into space. Ever since ordinary people have dreamt of getting there themselves. But after several false starts, a group of space obsessed entrepreneurs believe the first commercial flights into the final frontier are only a few years away.

Space Tourists

Documentary : Hubble Space Telescope (2006)
NASA, Unknown
Introduction, 01:21:00

n/a

Hubble Space Telescope

Documentary : Exploring Space (2003)
PBS, Unknown
Introduction, 01:54:00

Our galaxy alone contains hundreds of billions of stars, giving scientists a vast cosmic frontier to search. Could alien life be looking up at its own sky and asking, "Is there life out there?" Learn about the amazing quest for life that begins on Earth and extends into the heavens above.

The Quest for Life

Documentary : The Elegant Universe (2005)
NOVA, Brian Greene
Introduction, 03:00:00

In a rare blend of scientific insight and writing as elegant as the theories it explains, Brian Greene, one of the world's leading string theorists, peels away the layers of mystery surrounding string theory to reveal a universe that consists of eleven dimensions where all matter is generated by the vibrations of microscopically tiny loops of energy. Greene uses everything from an amusement park ride to ants on a garden hose to explain the beautiful yet bizarre realities that modern physics is unveiling. Dazzling in its brilliance, unprecedented in its ability to both illuminate and entertain, The Elegant Universe is a tour de force of scientific writing - a delightful, lucid voyage through modern physics that brings us closer to understanding how the universe works.

Einstein’s Universe
Strings the Thing
Welcome To The 11th Dimension

Documentary : Stephen Hawking’s Universe (2005)
Unknown, Unknown
Introduction, 06:00:00

Stephen Hawking's Universe is an astronomical documentary from 1997 made for the Public Broadcasting Service featuring the theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking. The six episode series discusses the history of astronomy as well as black holes and dark matter.

Seeing is believing
In the Beginning
Cosmic Alchemy
On the Dark Side
Black Holes and Beyond
An Answer to Everything

Documentary : Thunderbolts of the Gods (Unknown)
Unknown, Unknown
Introduction, 01:03:00

Note: This documentary promotes science that is generally not accepted and disagrees with the "Standard Model" of physics. It was included to give a basic understanding of the topic, please proceed at your own risk.

Thunderbolts of the Gods

Documentary : Cosmic Alchemy with Steven Hawking (Unknown)
Unknown, Steven Hawking
Introduction, Unknown

Out of the white-hot heat of the Big Bang arose everything that exists in the universe today. The long road that leads from this u Out of the white-hot heat of the Big Bang arose everything that exists in the universe today. The long road that leads from this ultra-dense soup of elementary particles and radiation to atoms, stars, planets, and life becomes one of the central paths in cosmologists’ efforts to understand how the universe is put together. Ironically, the physicists who unravelled the structure of the atom paved the way for those who ultimately figured out how the atoms themselves came to be

Cosmic Alchemy with Steven Hawking
 
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BoJangles2

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Re: Lectures Documentaries & Books ( Now Working )

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Lectures


Lecture : Stellar Simulations: searching for habitable planets (00:56:00)
University of Colorado, Sean Raymond
Introduction, 2007

Looking for a nice extra-solar vacation spot but worried about being downwind from a gas giant? Before booking your next interstellar flight, come check out how Sean Raymond's stellar simulations are being used in the search for habitable planets. Many of the 240 extra-solar planets that have been discovered so far are "hot Jupiters" -- gas giants orbiting very close to their host stars. Sean's work has shown that when these hot Jupiters form far from their host stars and migrate inward, they leave conditions in their wake favorable for the formation of a wide diversity of habitable planets, from small dry worlds to massive ocean-covered planets. In this talk, Sean will present an overview of his search to understand how and when habitable planets form, complete with movies of evolving solar systems. And even though you can't book a flight to Proxima Centauri yet, come see how current research is helping to narrow the search for places you might actually want to visit. Sean Raymond is a NASA Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Colorado's Center for Astrobiology.

Stellar Simulations: searching for habitable planets

Lecture : Pluto, Eris, and the Dwarf Planets of the Outer Solar System (2007)
Caltech, Mike Brown
Introduction, 01:14:00

The Kuiper Belt is a mysterious region beyond Neptune and stretching more than four billion miles from the Sun. Using powerful telescopes, scientists are scouring the Belt and beyond, finding hundreds of small frigid objects such as Eris, which is larger than Pluto and takes 560 years to orbit the Sun; and smaller Sedna, with an elliptical orbit that takes more than 10,000 years to complete. Join Mike Brown as he describes the hunt for these ancient and elusive worlds.

Pluto, Eris, and the Dwarf Planets of the Outer Solar System

Lecture : Faster than the Speed of Light - Could the laws of physics change? (01:11:00)
Perimeter Institute, João Magueijo
Introduction, 2006

The laws of physics are usually meant to be set in stone; variability is not usually part of physics. Yet contradicting Einstein's tenet of the constancy of the speed of light raises nothing less than that possibility. I will discuss some of the more dramatic implications of a varying speed of light. João Magueijo is Professor of Physics at Imperial College London. He is currently visiting Perimeter Institute and the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics in Toronto. He received his doctorate in theoretical physics at Cambridge University, and has been a visiting scientist at the University of California at Berkeley and Princeton University.

Faster than the Speed of Light - Could the laws of physics change?

Lecture : Fundamental Physics in 2010 (01:29:00)
Perimeter Institute, Nima Arkani-Hamed
Introduction, 2006

Will big questions be answered when the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) switches on in 2007? What will scientists find? Where might the research lead? Nima Arkani-Hamed, a noted particle theorist, is a Professor of Physics at Harvard University. He investigates a number of mysteries and interactions in nature – puzzles that are likely to have experimental consequences in the next few years via particle accelerators, like the LHC, as well as cosmological observations.

Fundamental Physics in 2010

Lecture : Conversations with History - Jim Peebles (00:56:00)
Princeton University, Jim Peebles
Introduction, 2006

Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes Princeton cosmologist Jim Peebles for a discussion of his intellectual odyssey. They discuss his contributions to cosmology and the future of the field

Conversations with History - Jim Peebles

Lecture : The Dirac Memorial Lecture (01:24:00)
derekmcd":2jtkxe77 said:
Californian Institute of Technology, Richard Feynman
Moderate, 1986

Paul Dirac predicted the existence of antiparticles, and Richard Feynman explains now why there must be antiparticles. He lectures about particles, quantum theory, and relativity. A special pleasure is watching Feynman’s personal style of lecturing: his humor, his showmanship, and his brilliance. (Overheads are are hard to read and may make it difficult to follow)

Elementary Particles and the Laws of Physics


Lecture : The Synthesis of Molecules in the Universe (2003)
Berkeley, Alexander Dalgarno
Introduction, 01:25:00

Earth is surrounded, and sustained, by molecules of extraordinary complexity and diversity. And yet, in the beginning of the universe there were no molecules of any kind. How did we get from there to here? In this Hitchcock Lecture presented by UC Berkeley, renowned astronomer and astrophysicist Alexander Dalgarno describes the synthesis of molecules in the universe and their unique complexity. Series: "UC Berkeley Graduate Council Lectures"

The Synthesis of Molecules in the Universe

Lecture : Comets and the Solar Wind (2003)
Berkeley, Alexander Dalgarno
Introduction, 00:50:00

Throughout the ages, comets have been both feared and celebrated. In this Hitchcock Lecture presented by UC Berkeley, renowned astronomer and astrophysicist Alexander Dalgarno relates comets and solar winds to molecular astrophysics. Series: UC Berkeley Graduate Council Lectures

Comets and the Solar Wind

Lecture : The Ends of the World: Astrobiology and Armageddon (2002)
University of Washington, Don Brownlee & Peter Ward
Introduction, 00:58:00

Two University of Washington science professors discuss their investigations into land and space. Astronomy professor Don Brownlee studies the solar system and its origins. Peter Ward, professor of earth and space sciences, researches living organisms and fossils.

The Ends of the World: Astrobiology and Armageddon

Lecture : Atoms to Xrays (2001)
UCSD, Kim Griest
Introduction, 00:42:00

Get ready to re-think your ideas of reality. Join UCSD physicist Kim Griest as he takes you on a fascinating excursion, addressing some of the massive efforts and tantalizing bits of evidence which suggest that what goes on in empty space determines the properties of the three-dimensional existence we know and love, and discusses how that reality may be but the wiggling of strings from other dimensions.

The Mystery of Empty Space

Lecture : Google Tech Talk (2007)
Google, Randall Smith
Introduction, 01:12:00

Supersymmetry, Extra Dimensions and the Origin of Mass: Exploring the Nature of the Universe Using PetaScale Data Analysis" The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), scheduled to begin operation in Summer 2008, will collide protons at energies not accessible since the time of the early Universe

Super-symmetry, Extra Dimensions and the Origin of Mass

Lecture : Google Tech Talk (2007)
Google, Randall Smith
Introduction, 00:52:00

Albert Einstein's General Theory of Relativity predicted results that were so incredible that even he did not accept them: space is expanding from a Big Bang, space itself contains an energy that is pulling the Universe apart from within, and deep chasms of gravity called black holes actually exist

NASA's "Beyond Einstein" Program: Exploration at the Limits of Space & Time

Lecture : Bay area Festival of Science (2007)
Wonderfest, Unknown
Introduction, 01:20:00

Alex Filippenko, Professor of Astronomy, UC Berkeley; Greg Laughlin, Associate Professor of Astronomy & Astrophysics, UC Santa Cruz

Will The universe Have A Happy Ending?

Lecture : Millennium Lectures (2000)
UCSD, Kim Griest
Introduction, 00:57:00

Join UCSD Physicist Kim Griest as he takes you on an exploration of two of the major unsolved questions in the physical sciences: What might be the fate of the universe and what is the nature of the dark matter which ultimately decides this fate?

Dark Matter and the Ultimate Fate of the Universe

Lecture : The Las Cumbres Observatory Lectures (2006)
UCSD, Alan Dressler
Introduction, 01:27:00

How common are Solar Systems like our own? How common are rocky worlds like our Earth? Are they suitable for life? Join Dr. Alan Dressler, famed for his studies of distant galaxies and of the large-scale structure of the universe, as he searches for life in the universe

The Search for another Earth

Lecture : From Quarks to Quasars (1998)
NASA, Bruno Rossi
Introduction, 00:58:00

Explore the people, science, and experience of launching NASA's Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer in this fascinating account of its launch and astounding early results. Series: "From Quarks to

Taking the Pulse of the Universe

Lecture : The Graduate Councils Lectures (2007)
Berkeley, James Peeble
Introduction, 00:53:00

The evidence is that the universe is close to uniform; it has no observable centre or edges; and that it is expanding. Cosmologist James Peebles, professor emeritus at Princeton University explores the histories of these ideas and the present state of the evidence for their reliability

Exploring the Large-Scale Nature of the Universe

Lecture : The Graduate Councils Lectures (2007)
Berkeley, James Peeble
Introduction, 00:53:00

The evidence is that the universe is close to uniform; it has no observable centre or edges; and that it is expanding. Cosmologist James Peebles, professor emeritus at Princeton University explores the histories of these ideas and the present state of the evidence for their reliability

Exploring the Large-Scale Nature of the Universe

Lecture : Eyes on the Universe Lectures (2000)
UCSD, James White
Introduction, v

Join the Astronomical Society of the Pacific's James White as he discusses how we think the universe appears, and more importantly, how we know that. Presented by the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center.

The Universe Has No Centre... and you’re not there

Lecture : Atoms to Xrays (2001)
UCSD, Rick Rothschold
Introduction, 00:46:00

From time immemorial the cosmos has comforted humanity with its seemingly placid constancy. However, when science looks closer, we get a different story. From solar flares and thermonuclear burning engulfing the surfaces of neutron stars, to particle beams and collisions of literally extragalactic proportions, UCSD's Rick Rothschild will explain why the universe could be Rated "R" for violence

The Universe is Rated R

Lecture : Graduate Council Lectures (2008)
UCSD, James Peeble
Introduction, 00:58:00

Join James Peebles, one of the world's foremost cosmologists, as he explores the universe. Like fossils, thermal radiation carries information about the past, in this case the nature of the early universe. This information has confirmed ideas about the expanding universe, and it has presented us with new challenges. In particular, dark matter and dark energy

Triumphs and Challenges for Modern Cosmology

Lecture : The Dawn of Creation (2008)
Berkeley, Steven Beckwith
Introduction, 01:38:00

Modern technical wonders like the Hubble Space Telescope have made it possible to look back to a time when the universe looked very different than it does today, when the first galaxies were created and the universe developed structure seen as patterns in the galaxies apparent today. This year’s Sackler Lecture will look back to the first 2 billion years.

The First 2 Billion Years

Lecture : The Las Cumbres Observatory Lectures (2008)
Berkeley, Alex Filippenko
Introduction, 01:56:00

World-renowned astronomer and prize-winning professor of astronomy at the University of California, Berkeley, Alex Filippenko, explores some of the mysteries of the universe at a special lecture at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History. Filippenko discusses observations of very distant exploding starts called super-novae that provide intriguing evidence that the expansion of the universe is now speeding up. Over the largest scales of space, the universe seems to be dominated by a repulsive "dark energy" of unknown origin, stretching the very fabric of space itself faster and faster with time

Dark Energy and the Runaway Universe

Lecture : Astronomical Observatory (Unknown)
Yale, Charles Bailyn
Introduction, 00:50:00

Yale University astronomy professor Charles Bailyn gives a guided tour of the two research telescopes operated by the WIYN Consortium at the Kitt Peak National Observatory in Arizona. The first telescope is a 0.9m aperture telescope built in the 1960s; the second is the WIYN 3.5m new technology telescope commissioned in 1994. The tour emphasizes the ways in which new technology has improved the quality of ground-based telescopes.

A tour from the Kitt Peak National Observatory

Lecture : Dark Energy, or Worse - Was Einstein Wrong? (Unknown)
Unknown, Sean Carroll
Introduction, Unknown,

The type of matter we're familiar with and encounter everyday - atoms and molecules - only makes up about 5 percent of the universe. The remaining 95 percent is believed to be dark matter and dark energy. Explore the history of dark energy and dark matter by following Einstein's path to uncovering the theory that sparked a change in the world of astrophysics and the controversies behind that theory. Join Physicist Sean Carroll, a senior research associate at the California Institute of Technology, in this lecture that sheds light on the "dark side" of the universe that may actually be the key to unlocking the mystery that is the universe.

Dark Energy, or Worse: Was Einstein Wrong?

Lecture : Dark Energy Rules the Universe (2008)
Unknown, Eric Linder
Introduction, Unknown

The revolutionary discovery that the expansion of the universe is speeding up, not slowing down from gravity, means that 75 percent of our universe consists of mysterious dark energy. Berkeley Lab theoretical physicist Eric Linder delves into the mystery of dark energy as part of the Science in the Theatre lecture series on Nov. 24, 2008

Dark Energy Rules the Universe

Lecture : The ATLAS Experiment (2007)
Berkeley, Michael Barnett
Introduction, Unknown

Michael Barnett of Berkeley Lab's Physics Division discusses the ATLAS Experiment at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics' (CERN) Large Hadron Collider. The collider will explore the aftermath of collisions at the highest energy ever produced in the lab, and will recreate the conditions of the universe a billionth of a second after the Big Bang. The ATLAS detector is half the size of the Notre Dame Cathedral and required 2000 physicists and engineers from 35 countries for its construction. Its goals are to examine mini-black holes, identify dark matter, understand antimatter, search for extra dimensions of space, and learn about the fundamental forces that have shaped the universe since the beginning of time and will determine its fate. His talk was presented July 25, 2007

Mapping the Secrets of the Universe

Lecture : The Big Bang, COBE, and the Relic Radiation of Creation (2007)
Berkeley, George Smoot & John Mather
Introduction, Unknown

Berkeley Lab's George Smoot won the 2006 Physics Nobel Prize, together with John Mather of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, for "the discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation." The anisotropy showed as small variations in the map of the early universe. This research looks back into the infant universe and provides a better understanding of the origin of galaxies and stars. The cosmic background radiation is a tool to understand the structure and history of the universe and the structure of space-time. These observations have provided increased support for the big bang theory of the universe's origin. The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) NASA satellite, launched in 1989, carries instruments that measured various aspects of cosmic microwave background radiation, and produced the data for these compelling scientific results, which opened up a field that continues very actively today. His talk was presented March 5, 2007.

The Big Bang, COBE, and the Relic Radiation of Creation

Lecture : Distinguished Lecture in Astronomy (Unknown)
Unknown, Steven Beckwith
Introduction, Unknown

The Raymond and Beverly Sackler Distinguished Lecture in Astronomy, "The Dawn of Creation: The First 2 Billion Years". Steven Beckwith, Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies, University of California, Office of the President. Modern technical wonders like the Hubble Space Telescope have made it possible to look back to a time when the universe looked very different than it does today, when the first galaxies were created and the universe developed structure seen as patterns in the galaxies apparent today. This year’s Sackler Lecture will look back to the first 2 billion years.

Distinguished Lecture in Astronomy: Steven Beckwith

Lecture : The Search for Another Earth (Unknown)
Unknown, Alan Dressler
Introduction, Unknown

How common are Solar Systems like our own? How common are rocky worlds like our Earth? Are they suitable for life? Join Dr. Alan Dressler, famed for his studies of distant galaxies and of the large-scale structure of the universe, as he searches for life in the universe.

The Search for Another Earth

Lecture : Cosmic Voyages through Computer Simulation and Visualization (Unknown)
Unknown, Mike Norman
Introduction, Unknown

Using the known laws of physics and the immense capacities of high performance computers, renowned astrophysicist Mike Norman takes you on an unprecedented journey across space and time to witness the formation of galaxies and cosmic structure as well as the formation of one of the first stars to shine in the universe. Series: "Atoms to X-Rays"

Cosmic Voyages through Computer Simulation and Visualization

Lecture : The Douglas Robb Memorial Lectures (Unknown)
derekmcd":2jtkxe77 said:
University of Auckland, Richard Feynman
Introduction, Unknown

Chosen by the New Scientist - best on-line videos 2007. A set of four priceless archival video recordings from the University of Auckland (New Zealand) of the outstanding Nobel prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman - arguably the greatest science lecturer ever. Although the recording is of modest technical quality the exceptional personal style and unique delivery shine through. Part 1: Photons - Corpuscles of Light, A gentle lead-in to the subject, Feynman starts by discussing photons and their properties. Part 2: Fits of Reflection and Transmission - Quantum Behaviour, What are reflection and transmission, and how do they work? Part 3: Electrons and their Interactions, Feynman diagrams and the intricacies of particle interaction.

Photons - Corpuscles of Light
Fits of Reflection and Transmission - Quantum Behaviour
Electrons and their Interactions
New Queries

Lecture : The Dirac Memorial Lecture (01:24:00)
derekmcd":2jtkxe77 said:
Californian Institute of Technology, Richard Feynman
Moderate, 1986

Paul Dirac predicted the existence of antiparticles, and Richard Feynman explains now why there must be antiparticles. He lectures about particles, quantum theory, and relativity. A special pleasure is watching Feynman’s personal style of lecturing: his humor, his showmanship, and his brilliance.

Elementary Particles and the Laws of Physics

Lecture : American Astronomical Society (ASS) – 111th Meeting (Unknown)

Lecture : American Astronomical Society (ASS) – 112th Meeting (Unknown)
 
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BoJangles2

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Re: Lectures Documentaries & Books ( Now Working )

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Hard Science Lectures (Posted by Derekmcd)


Lecture : Connections Between Big and Small (Unknown)
CERN, John Ellis
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

Part 1
Lecture notes

Lecture : The Contents, Kinematics, and Dynamics of the Universe (Unknown)
Stanford/SLAC, Roger Blandford
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

Part 1 Lecture notes
Part 2 Lecture notes
Part 3



Lecture : Inflation (Unknown)

Lecture : The Cosmic Microwave Background (Unknown)
University of Chicago, Bruce Winstein
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

Part 1 Lecture notes
Part 2 Lecture notes
Part 3 Lecture notes

Lecture : Galaxy Clusters and Cosmology (Unknown)
University of Hawaii, J. Patrick Henry
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

Part 1 lecture notes
Part 2 lecture notes

Lecture : Formation of Galaxies and Large Scale Structures (Unknown)
The Hebrew University, Avishai Dekel
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

Part 1 lecture notes
Part 2 lecture notes

Lecture : High Energy Cosmic Rays (Unknown)
University of California, Los Angeles, Rene Ong
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

Part 1 lecture notes
Part 2 lecture notes

Lecture : Dark Matter and Dark Energy (Unknown)
University of California, Los Angeles, Rocky Kolb
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

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Part 2 lecture notes Part 3 lecture notes

Lecture : Searches for Dark Matter (Unknown)
University of California, Santa Barbara, Harry Nelson
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

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Lecture : SUSY and Cosmology (Unknown)
University of California, Irvine, Jonathan Feng
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

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Lecture : Results from WMAP (Unknown)
UCLA, Ned Wright
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

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Lecture : Searches for Dark Matter (Unknown)
University of Sheffield, Neil Spooner
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

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Lecture : New Results from SNO (Unknown)
University of Pennsylvania, Scott Oser
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

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Lecture : Recent Results from KamLAND (Unknown)
Stanford, Jason Detwiler
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

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Lecture : Neutrino Masses & Mixing - Implications (Unknown)
Fermilab, John Beacom
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

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Lecture : CP Violation at Babar & Belle (Unknown)
Iowa State University, Soeren Prell
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

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Lecture : Rare B Decays at Belle & Babar (Unknown)
University of Tokyo, Hiroaki Aihara
Moderate, [Unknown]

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Lecture : New Results from the Tevatron (Unknown)
Ohio State University, Evelyn Thomson
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

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Lecture : Recent Results from E-158 (Unknown)
SLAC, Mike Woods
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

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Lecture : INTEGRAL - A New Gamma-ray Astronomy Mission (Unknown)
Goddard Space Flight Center, Bonnard Teegarden
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

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Lecture : Recent Results from Air Cherenkov Telescopes (Unknown)
Iowa State University, Frank Krennich
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

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Lecture : Results from Cangaroo (Unknown)
Kyoto University, Frank Krennich
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

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Lecture : Type 1A Supernovae as Standard Candles (Unknown)
University of Arizona, Philip Pinto
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

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Lecture : Dark Energy and the Preposterous Universe (Unknown)
University of Chicago, Sean Carroll
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

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Lecture : The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (Unknown)
Fermilab, Stephen Kent
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

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Lecture : Weak Lensing Results from the Deep Lens Survey (Unknown)
Bell Labs, David Wittman
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

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Lecture : Jet Quenching at RHIC (Unknown)
Texas A&M, Carl Gagliardi
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

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Lecture : Recent Results from CHANDRA/XMM (Unknown)
Marshall Space Flight Center, Martin Weisskopf
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

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Lecture : First Results from LIGO (Unknown)
LIGO Hanford Observatory, v
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

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Lecture : Cosmology with Extra Dimensions (Unknown)
Oxford University, John March-Russell
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

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Lecture : Cosmic Connections (Unknown)
CERN, John Ellis
Moderate, [Unknown]

[n/a]

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Re: Lectures Documentaries & Books ( Now Working )

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Lecture Series


Lecture : Frontiers & Controversies in Astrophysics (2006)

Lecture : Classical Mechanics (Unknown)

Lecture : Classical Physics 10 - Physics for Future Presidents (Unknown)
Berkeley, Richard A. Muller
Moderate, [Unknown]

Physics 10: Physics for Future Presidents - Fall 2006. The most interesting and important topics in physics, stressing conceptual understanding rather than math, with applications to current events. Topics covered may vary and may include energy and conservation, radioactivity, nuclear physics, the Theory of Relativity, lasers, explosions, earthquakes, superconductors, and quantum physics.

Lecture 01: Atoms and Heat
Lecture 02: Atoms and Heat II
Lecture 03: Gravity and Satellites
Lecture 04: Gravity and Satellites II
Lecture 05: Radioactivity
Lecture 06: Radioactivity II
Lecture 07: Nukes
Lecture 08: Review Session
Lecture 09: Electricity and Magnetism
Lecture 10: Electricity and Magnetism II
Lecture 11: Waves I
Lecture 12: Waves II
Lecture 13: Light I
Lecture 14: Light II
Lecture 15: Invisible Light I
Lecture 16: Invisible Light II
Lecture 17: Quantum I
Lecture 18: Quantum II
Lecture 19: Quantum III
Lecture 20: Quantum IV
Lecture 21: Review Session
Lecture 22: Relativity
Lecture 23: Relativity II
Lecture 24: Universe I
Lecture 25: Universe II
Lecture 26: Review Session
 
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Re: Lectures Documentaries & Books ( Now Working )

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Books (Posted by DrRocket)


A Brief History of Time --Stephen Hawking
Black Holes and Baby Universes and other Essays -- Stephen Hawking
The Universe in a Nutshell -- Stephen Hawking
The Future of Spacetime -- Stephen Hawking, Kip Thorne, Igor Novikov, Alan Lightman
The Nature of Space and Time -- Stephen Hawking and Roge Penrose
The First Three Minutes -- Steven Weinberg
The Discovery of Sub-atomic Particles -- Steven Weinberg
Dreams of a Final Theory -- Steven Weinberg
The Character of Physical Law -- Richard Feynman
QED -- Richard Feynman
The Pleasure of Finding Things Out -- Richard Feynman
The Meaning of it All -- Richard Feynman
The Quark and the Jaguar -- Murray Gell-Mann
Black Holes and Time Warps, Einstein's Outrageous Legacy -- Kip Thorne
The Physics of Star Trek -- Lawrence Kraus
Beyond Star Trek -- Lawrence Kraus
Space, Time and Gravity -- Robert Wald
Three Roads to Quantum Gravity -- Lee Smolin
The Trouble with Physics -- Lee Smolin
The Emperor's New Mind -- Roger Penrose
The Road to Reality, A Complete Guide to the Laws of the Universe -- Roger Penrose
The God Particle -- Leon Lederman
Conversations on the Dark Side of Physics -- Edward Teller
Superstrings -- edited by Paul Davies and J. Brown
The Inflationary Universe -- Alan Guth
The Elegant Universe -- Brian Greene
The Fabric of the Cosmos -- Brian Greene
Relativity, the Special and General Theory -- Albert Eiinstein
The Black Hole War -- Leonard Susskind


Here are some real physics texts, not for the faint of heart


The Feynman Lectures on Physics -- Feynman, Leighton and Sands
Fundamentals of Physics, Extended -- Haliday, Resnick and Walker
Thermal Physics --Morse
Elements of Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer -- Obert and Young
Theory of Elasticity -- Timoshenko and Goodier
Fluid Dynamics for Physicists -- T.E. Faber
Supersonic Flow and Shock Waves -- R. Courant and K.O. Friedrichs
The Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Compressible Fluid Flow I.II --Shapiro
Classical Dynamics of Particles and Systems -- Marion
Classical Electromagnetic Radiation --Marion
Classical Mechanics -- Goldstein
Classical Electrodynamics -- Jackson
A Course in Theoretical Physics ( 10 volumes ) -- Landau and ____
Quantum Mechanics -- Messiah
Quantum Mechanics -- P.J.E. Peebles
The Principles of Quantum Mechanics --P.A.M. Dirac
Mathematical Foundations of Quantum Mechanics -- John Von Neumann
Relativistic Quantum Mechanics -- Bjorken and Drell
Relativistic Quantum Fields -- Bjorken and Drell
The Quantum Theory of Fields I, II, III -- Steven Weinberg
Particles, Sources and Fields I, II, III -- Julian Schwinger
Quantum Field Theory in a Nutshell --A. Zee
Modern Elementary Particle Physics, The Fundamental Particles and Forces ? -- Gordon Kane
Gravitation and Cosmology, Principles and Applications of the General Theory of Relativity -- Steven Weinberg
General Relativity -- Robert Wald
Gravitation -- Charles Misner, Kip Thorne, John Archibald Wheeler
The large scale structure of space-time -- S.W. Hawking and G.F.R. Ellis
Priinciples of Physical Cosmology -- P.J.E. Peebles
Plasma Physics -- S. Chandrasekhar
Hydrodynamic and Hydromagnetic Stability -- S. Chandrasekhar
The Mathematical Theory of Black Holes -- S. Chandrasekhar
Cosmical Electrodynamics -- Hannes Alfven and Carl-Gunne Falthammar
Methods of Mathematical Physics --Courant and Hilbert
Quantum Field Theory and Strings, A Course for Mathematicians I, II-- Pierre Deligne, Pavel Etingof, Daniel S. Freed, Lisa C. Jeffrey, David Kazhdan, John W. Morgan, David R. Morrison, and Edward Witten
Superstriing Theory I and II -- M.B. Greene, J.H. Schwartz and E. Witten
The Principle of Relativity -- Einstein, Lorentz, Weyl and Minkowski
 
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New - Resources (Posted by Derekmcd)


Lecture : The Physics of Impossible Things (2008)
Perimeter Institute, Ben Schumacher
Moderate, 01:11:00

Some things can happen in our Universe, and others cannot. The laws of physics establish the boundary between possibility and impossibility. Physicists naturally spend most of their time thinking about the possible. In this lecture, however, we will make a brief reconnaissance across the frontier to study impossible things and discover the surprising connections between them. We will encounter standard science-fiction devices like time machines and faster-than-light spaceships -- as well as other, less-familiar prodigies including quantum cloners and bounded electromagnetic miracles. A safe return to the real world is unconditionally guaranteed.

The Physics of Impossible Things

Lecture : Anticipating A New Golden Age (2008)
Perimeter Institute, Frank Wilczek
Moderate, 00:59:00

Our present Core Theory of matter (aka standard model) was born in the 1970s, a Golden Age for fundamental physics. To date it has passed every experimental test, extending by many orders of magnitude – to higher energies, shorter distances, and greater precision than were available in the 1970s. Yet we are not satisfied, because the Core Theory postulates four separate interactions and several different kinds of matter, and its equations are lopsided. In this lecture, Prof. Wilczek will describe powerful and extremely beautiful ideas for restoring unity and symmetry to the fundamental laws

Anticipating A New Golden Age

Lecture : Before the Big Bang: Is There Evidence For Something And If So, What? (2008)
Perimeter Institute, Roger Penrose
Moderate, [Unknown]

There is now a great deal of evidence confirming the existence of a very hot and dense early stage of the universe. Much of this data comes from a detailed study of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) - radiation from the early universe that was most recently measured by NASA's WMAP satellite. But the information presents new puzzles for scientists. One of the most blatant examples is an apparent paradox related to the second law of thermodynamics. Although some have argued that the hypothesis of inflationary cosmology solves some of the puzzles, profound issues remain.

Before the Big Bang: Is There Evidence For Something And If So, What?

Lecture : Time and Einstein in the 21st Century: The coolest stuff in the universe (2008)
Perimeter Institute, William (Bill) Phillips
Moderate, [Unknown]

At the beginning of the 20th century Einstein published three revolutionary ideas that changed forever how we view Nature. At the beginning of the 21st century Einstein's thinking is shaping one of the key scientific and technological wonders of contemporary life: atomic clocks, the best timekeepers ever made. Such super-accurate clocks are essential to industry, commerce, and science; they are the heart of the Global Positioning System (GPS), which guides cars, airplanes, and hikers to their destinations. Today, atomic clocks are still being improved, using Einstein's ideas to cool the atoms to incredibly low temperatures

Time and Einstein in the 21st Century: The coolest stuff in the universe

Lecture : Science Fiction and Reality (2008)
Perimeter Institute, Gerard 't Hooft
Moderate, [Unknown]

In the recent past, rapid scientific and technological developments have had tremendous impact on human society. Notably, the personal computer, internet and mobile telephones changed the world and shrank our planet. These developments are vastly different from the forecasts by science fiction authors who promised us space travel and intelligent humanoid robots. Could real scientists have done a better job in forecasting the future? What can we say about the future now? Many science fiction fantasies will never materialize. Some will, but only over time spans of millions of years rather than a couple of centuries.

Science Fiction and Reality

Lecture : The Curious World of Probabilities (2008)
Perimeter Institute, Jeffrey Rosenthal - University of Toronto
Moderate, [Unknown]

Probabilities and randomness arise whenever we're not sure what will happen next. They apply to everything from lottery jackpots to airplane crashes; email spam to insurance policies; medical studies to election polls. This exploration of odds and oddities will explain how a Probability Perspective can shed new light on many familiar situations in our everyday lives, and how computer algorithms which use randomness can be used to address problems in many branches of science.

The Curious World of Probabilities

Lecture : What Banged? (2008)
Perimeter Institute, Neil Turok - Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics
Moderate, [Unknown]

The evidence that the universe emerged 14 billion years ago from an event called 'the big bang' is overwhelming. Yet the cause of this event remains deeply mysterious. In the conventional picture, the 'initial singularity' is unexplained. It is simply assumed that the universe somehow sprang into existence full of 'inflationary' energy, blowing up the universe into the large, smooth state we observe today. While this picture is in excellent agreement with current observations, it is both contrived and incomplete, leading us to suspect that it is not the final word.

What Banged?

Lecture : Rocketeers: How a Visionary Band of Business Leaders, Engineers, and Pilots is Boldy Privatizing Space(2008)
Perimeter Institute, Michael Belfiore
Moderate, [Unknown]

In the 'second space age', human spaceflight is no longer the domain of governments. Dream-chasing entrepreneurs and clever engineers are aggressively blazing new trails into the heavens and preparing the world for an era of space tourism, ultra fast point-to-point earth travel and even orbiting hotels. Having gained inside access into the top private space programs, science journalist Michael Belfiore will share his many insights on the history-making flights, the failures and fatalities, as well as the enduring passion and dreams of the real estate tycoons, dot-com billionaires, a video game programmer and other business mavericks for whom the sky is no longer the limit

Rocketeers: How a Visionary Band of Business Leaders, Engineers, and Pilots is Boldy Privatizing Space

Lecture : The Physics of Information: From Entanglement to Black Holes (2008)
Perimeter Institute, Leonard Susskind - Stanford University, Sir Anthony Leggett, Christopher Fuchs, Seth Lloyd - Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Bob McDonald - Quirks and Quarks (CBC Radio One)
Moderate, [Unknown]

Do ideas about information and reality inspire fruitful new approaches to the hardest problems of modern physics? What can we learn about the paradoxes of quantum mechanics, the beginning of the universe and our understanding of black holes by thinking about the very essence of information? The answers to these questions are surprising and enlightening, but also controversial. The topic of information within physics has involved some of the 20th century's greatest scientists in long-running intellectual battles that continue to the present day.

The Physics of Information: From Entanglement to Black Holes

Lecture : The Large Hadron Collider - World's Most Powerful Microscope (2008)
Perimeter Institute, Robert Orr, John Ellis - European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN)
Moderate, [Unknown]

International researchers at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), in Geneva, Switzerland, will soon embark on one of science's greatest adventures. With its very high energy, previously seen only in cosmic rays, the particle collider will probe the inner structure of matter at distances ten times smaller than any previous experiments. The LHC will address many of the mysteries surrounding the smallest particles of matter. It may also pierce secrets that the Universe has hidden since the early stages of the Big Bang, such as the nature of dark matter and the origin of matter itself.

The Large Hadron Collider - World's Most Powerful Microscope

Lecture : From Einstein's Intuition to Quantum Bits (2008)
Perimeter Institute, Alain Aspect - Institut d'Optique Graduate School
Moderate, [Unknown]

Many experts are convinced that large scale, practical implementations of quantum information systems hold great promise for society, much as the laser and the transistor have already revolutionized the world. This stems from a long history of research that included an intense, raging battle of epic proportions between scientific giants. In tracing these steps, you will learn why Albert Einstein and Niels Bohr argued over the nature of entangled states where pairs of sub-atomic particles are strangely correlated from 1935 until their very deaths.

From Einstein's Intuition to Quantum Bits

Lecture : Death of the Dinos: Giant Impacts and Biological Crises (2008)
Perimeter Institute, Jay Melosh - University of Arizona
Moderate, [Unknown]

Sixty-five million years ago dinosaurs ruled the warm Cretaceous Earth. Without warning, this world was swept away forever by the impact of an asteroid about 15 km in diameter, leaving a huge scar now called the Chicxulub crater in Yucatan, Mexico. This catastrophe set the stage for the ascendance of our own biological group, the mammals. Although the fact of this impact is now established beyond doubt, the precise means by which an impact could wipe out such a large fraction of the Earth's inhabitants is not fully understood.

Death of the Dinos: Giant Impacts and Biological Crises

Lecture : Quantum Cryptography: A Tale of Secrets Hidden and Revealed Through the Laws of Physics (2008)
Perimeter Institute, Daniel Gottesman - Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics
Moderate, [Unknown]

Sensitive information can be valuable to others - from your personal credit card numbers to state and military secrets. Throughout history, sophisticated codes have been developed in an attempt to keep important data from prying eyes. But now, new technologies are emerging based on the surprising laws of quantum physics that govern the atomic scale. These powerful techniques threaten to crack some secret codes in widespread use today and, at the same time, offer new quantum cryptographic protocols which could one day profoundly alter the way we safeguard critical information.

Quantum Cryptography: A Tale of Secrets Hidden and Revealed Through the Laws of Physics

Lecture : Life, the Universe, and the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) (2008)
Perimeter Institute, Jill Tarter - SETI Institute
Moderate, [Unknown]

Hollywood movies about aliens abound, but do they really exist? The real scientific search for evidence of life, and particularly intelligent life, elsewhere in the cosmos is just as exciting as the “reel” version, and a lot more logical. So far, there is ‘life-as-we-know-it to guide our speculations and observations. But a new appreciation for the tenacity of life, a growing respect for the world of microbes, and new search technologies involving observatories and spacecraft are rapidly expanding our viewpoint. Many expect surprises.

Life, the Universe, and the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI)

Lecture : Fundamental Physics in 2010 (2008)
Perimeter Institute, Nima Arkani-Hamed - Institute for Advanced Study
Moderate, [Unknown]

Will big questions be answered when the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) switches on in 2007? What will scientists find? Where might the research lead? Nima Arkani-Hamed, a noted particle theorist, is a Professor of Physics at Harvard University. He investigates a number of mysteries and interactions in nature – puzzles that are likely to have experimental consequences in the next few years via particle accelerators, like the LHC, as well as cosmological observations. fundamental physics, Nima Arkani-Hamed, 'Future of Fundamental Physics', general relativity, quantum mechanics, Large Hadrom Collider, L H C, quark, quantum gravity, string theory, special relativity, standard model

Fundamental Physics in 2010

Lecture : From here to eternity: Global warming in geologic time (2008)
Perimeter Institute, David Archer - University of Chicago
Moderate, [Unknown]

Using results from models of the atmosphere/ocean/sediment carbon cycle, the impacts of fossil-fuel CO2 release will be examined – including the effect on climate many thousands of years into the future, rather than for just a few centuries as commonly claimed. Prof. Archer will explain how aspects of the Earth system, such as the growth or melting of the great ice sheets, the thawing of permafrost, and the release of methane from the methane hydrate deposits in the deep ocean, take thousands of years to respond to a change in climate.

From here to eternity: Global warming in geologic time

Lecture : Time and Motion (2008)
Perimeter Institute, Harvey Brown - University of Oxford
Moderate, [Unknown]

Newton's first law of motion - and the very meaning of inertia - has been described as either completely obvious (D'Alembert) or a 'logician's nightmare' (ex-editor of the American Journal of Physics). Sometimes the simplest things in physics are the most subtle. The first law will be described in historical context, explaining a connection with the ancient Greeks distinction between natural and violent motion and with Descartes' natural philosophy. You will also learn why it still requires careful handling and what it tells us about time in physics.

Time and Motion

Lecture : A Madman Dreams of Turing Machines: Limits of Truth and Mind (2008)
Perimeter Institute, Janna Levin
Moderate, [Unknown]

From Levins recent book comes a strange if true story of coded secrets, psychotic delusions, mathematics, and war. This story of greatness and weakness, of genius and delusion, circulates around the parallel lives of Kurt Gödel, the greatest logician of many centuries, and Alan Turing, the extraordinary code breaker during World War II. Taken together their work proved that there are limits to knowledge, that machines could be taught to compute, that one day there could be artificial intelligence. Yet Gödel believed in transmigration of the soul and Turing concluded that we were soulless biological machines. And their suicides were complementary.

A Madman Dreams of Turing Machines: Limits of Truth and Mind

Lecture : Impossible Crystals (2008)
Perimeter Institute, Paul Steinhardt
Moderate, [Unknown]

This is a story of how the impossible became possible. How, for centuries, scientists were absolutely sure that solids (as well as decorative patterns like tiling and quilts) could only have certain symmetries - such as square, hexagonal and triangular - and that most symmetries, including five-fold symmetry in the plane and icosahedral symmetry in three dimensions (the symmetry of a soccer ball), were strictly forbidden. Then, about twenty years ago, a new kind of pattern, known as a 'quasicrystal,' was envisaged that shatters the symmetry restrictions and allows for an infinite number of new patterns and structures that had never been seen before, suggesting a whole new class of material

Impossible Crystals

Lecture : Faster than the Speed of Light - Could the laws of physics change? (2008)
Perimeter Institute, João Magueijo - Imperial College
Moderate, [Unknown]

The laws of physics are usually meant to be set in stone; variability is not usually part of physics. Yet contradicting Einstein's tenet of the constancy of the speed of light raises nothing less than that possibility. I will discuss some of the more dramatic implications of a varying speed of light. João Magueijo is Professor of Physics at Imperial College London. He is currently visiting Perimeter Institute and the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics in Toronto. He received his doctorate in theoretical physics at Cambridge University, and has been a visiting scientist at the University of California at Berkeley and Princeton University.

]Faster than the Speed of Light - Could the laws of physics change?

Lecture : The Quantum and the Cosmos (2008)
Perimeter Institute, Edward Kolb - University of Chicago
Moderate, [Unknown]

Long before the emergence of planets, stars, or galaxies, the universe consisted of an exploding quantum soup of elementary particles. Encoded in this formless, shapeless soup were seeds of cosmic structure, which over billions of years grew into the beautiful and complex universe we observe today. The lecture will explore the connection between the inner space of the quantum and the outer space of the cosmos. The inner space/outer space connection may hold the key to the nature of the dark matter holding together our galaxy and the mysterious dark energy pulling apart our universe. Edward W. Kolb (known to most as Rocky) is a founding head of the NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Group

The Quantum and the Cosmos

Lecture : A Night with Nobel - The Origin of Mass and the Feebleness of Gravity (2008)
Perimeter Institute, Frank Wilczek
Moderate, [Unknown]

Einstein's famous equation E=mc2 asserts that energy and mass are different aspects of the same reality. It is usually associated with the idea that small amounts of mass can be converted into large amounts of energy. For fundamental physics, however, the more important idea is just the opposite. Researchers want to explain how mass itself arises, by explaining it in terms of more basic concepts. In this lecture targeted for a general audience, Prof. Wilczek will explain how this goal can, to a remarkable extent, be achieved.

A Night with Nobel - The Origin of Mass and the Feebleness of Gravity

Lecture : The Search for Miss Leavitt (2008)
Perimeter Institute, George Johnson
Moderate, [Unknown]

Inside Harvard College Observatory in 1904, a young woman named Henrietta Swan Leavitt sat hunched over a stack of glass photographic plates, patiently counting stars. The images had been taken by a telescope high in the Peruvian Andes, and Miss Leavitt was given the tedious chore of measuring the brightness of thousands of tiny lights, something that would now be done by machine. Her job title was 'computer,' but during the next few years she rose above her station as a tabulator of data and discovered a new law, one that would change forever our view of the universe.

The Search for Miss Leavitt

Lecture : Programming the Universe (2008)
Perimeter Institute, Seth Lloyd - Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
Moderate, [Unknown]

The universe computes: every atom, electron, and elementary particle registers bits of information, and every time two particles collide those bits are flipped and processed. By ‘hacking the computational power of the universe, we can build quantum computers which store and process information at the level of atoms and electrons. This computational capacity underlies the generation of complex systems, and provides insight into the origin of life and its future. Seth Lloyd is a professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Programming the Universe

Lecture : Mission to Mars: Still Roving on the Red Planet (2008)
Perimeter Institute, John Grant - Smithsonian Institution
Moderate, [Unknown]

An expected 90 day robotic odyssey on Mars has stretched into a two year scientific marathon. Dr. Grant, a geologist with the Center for Earth and Planetary Studies, helped pick the landing sites and works on day-to-day operations of the Spirit and Opportunity Rovers. Youll see the latest photos, learn what Martian mysteries have been uncovered and find out how scientists plan to push the limits of future robots in space. Dr. John A. Grant, III joined the Smithsonian in the fall of 2000 as a Geologist at the Center for Earth and Planetary Studies at the National Air and Space Museum.

Mission to Mars: Still Roving on the Red Planet

Lecture : Are You Conscious? (2008)
Perimeter Institute, Jay Ingram - Discovery Channel Canada
Moderate, [Unknown]

The scientific approach to consciousness is a relatively new pursuit, but it has already revealed some startling facts about the cavalcade of feelings, images and thoughts that stream through our heads every waking moment. Jay Ingram will present some of the most surprising of these in a talk based on his best-selling book, Theatre of the Mind. Jay Ingram is the author of several bestselling books, including The Science of Everyday Life, The Barmaids Brain and The Velocity of Honey. He is producer and co-host of the Discovery Channels award-winning show Daily Planet, and also contributes a weekly science column to the Toronto Star. He holds two ACTRAs, the Royal Society of Canada McNeil

Are You Conscious?

Lecture : The Drug Trial: You Be the Judge (2008)
Perimeter Institute, Miriam Shuchman - State University of New York at Buffalo
Moderate, [Unknown]

How do you advise a scientist who says she has information that could be vital to the event health but shes been told to keep it a secret? In this talk Dr. Shuchman will discuss the dramatic act of blowing the whistle in science. Drawing on the extensive information in her best-selling book including interviews with whistleblowers, surveys of scientists and public testimony - and adding new material that isnt in the book –Shuchman will outline the benefits of scientific whistleblowing over the past 40 years. Then she will describe its aftermath. In case after case, Shuchman will give audience members the information and ask their opinions of what should have happened.

The Drug Trial: You Be the Judge

Lecture : The Big Bang (2008)
Perimeter Institute, Simon Singh - BBC
Moderate, [Unknown]

Simon Singh grew up in Somerset, and completed his undergraduate work at Imperial College London, and his Ph.D. at Cambridge University and CERN. He has worked with the BBCs Science Department since 1990. In 1996, Singh directed the award-winning documentary Fermats Last Theorem. The documentary was also nominated for an Emmy under the American title The Proof. He is the author of three books, most recently, the Big Bang, a history of cosmology.

The Big Bang

Lecture : Einstein - Relativity and Beyond (2008)
Perimeter Institute, John Moffat - Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Howard Burton - Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Lee Smolin, John Stachel
Moderate, [Unknown]

Einsteins profound ideas about relativity and the quantum have provided generations of people with some of the most thought-provoking concepts ever proposed about the wonders and mysteries of our universe. This lively panel discussion will examine Einsteins enormous contributions to our understanding.

Einstein - Relativity and Beyond

Lecture : The Quest for Supersymmetry (2008)
Perimeter Institute, Edward Witten
Moderate, [Unknown]

Edward Witten is one of the world’s preeminent string theorists. Among his many accomplishments, he is widely known for showing how five different variations of string theory all belong within a single framework. His awards range from a MacArthur 'genius grant' to the Fields Medal - the highest honour in the world of mathematics. Professor Witten will examine key discoveries made by physicists in the 20th century such as the detection of antimatter.

The Quest for Supersymmetry

Lecture : From Einstein to Quantum Information (2008)
Perimeter Institute, Anton Zeilinger
Moderate, [Unknown]

Anton Zeilinger, a renowned physicist who successfully teleported light particles, will explain how quantum properties are used today to process and transmit information.

From Einstein to Quantum Information

Lecture : The Black Hole Wars (2005)
Perimeter Institute, Leonard Susskind - Stanford University
Moderate, [Unknown]

The strange paradoxes and puzzles of the quantum behaviour of black holes and the things that fall into them led to a spirited battle of ideas between Stephen Hawking, Leonard Susskind and other scientists. Resolving the debate may change our entire understanding of space, time, matter and information – is the entire world, for example, a quantum hologram?

The Black Hole Wars

Lecture : The Florentine Heretic? Galileo, the church and the cosmos (2005)
Perimeter Institute, David Lindberg
Moderate, [Unknown]

Galileo’s campaign on behalf of the modern view of the solar system is one of the most dramatic events in the history of relations between Christianity and science – endlessly portrayed as a battle between theological interests and scientific freedom. But this traditional story is filled with factual errors. And when human fears, rivalries, revenge and the like are taken into account, the story takes on an altogether different cast. In Professor Lindberg’s retelling, the ideological side of the story will be balanced with its richness as a human event.

The Florentine Heretic? Galileo, the church and the cosmos

Lecture : Harnessing the Quantum World (2004)
Perimeter Institute, Raymond Laflamme - University of Waterloo/IQC
Moderate, [Unknown]

Are you ready for this upgrade? The very foundation of computer science is changing. As Moore's Law draws to a close, rules of quantum physics are taking over. Learn how leading researchers are using counterintuitive effects, such as superposition, in their quest to build ultra-powerful quantum computers. You'll see how quantum particles behave, are controlled and, ultimately, used to calculate.

Harnessing the Quantum World

Lecture : Proofs and Pictures: The Role of Visualization in Mathematical and Scientific Reasoning (2004)
Perimeter Institute, James Brown - University of Toronto
Moderate, [Unknown]

Do you have to see it to believe it? James Robert Brown, Professor of Philosophy at the University of Toronto, will discuss the highly interesting but controversial topic of the legitimate role of visual thinking in mathematics and science. Examples of picture proofs and thought experiments will be given. An explanation of how they work will be sketched.

Proofs and Pictures: The Role of Visualization in Mathematical and Scientific Reasoning

Lecture : The Stability of the Solar System (2004)
Perimeter Institute, James Brown - University of Toronto
Moderate, [Unknown]

Do you have to see it to believe it? James Robert Brown, Professor of Philosophy at the University of Toronto, will discuss the highly interesting but controversial topic of the legitimate role of visual thinking in mathematics and science. Examples of picture proofs and thought experiments will be given. An explanation of how they work will be sketched.

The Stability of the Solar System
 
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BoJangles2

Guest
Re: Lectures Documentaries & Books ( Now Working )

<Reserved>
 
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BoJangles2

Guest
Re: Lectures Documentaries &amp; Books ( Now Working )

<Reserved>
 
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BoJangles2

Guest
Re: Lectures Documentaries &amp; Books ( Now Working )

<Reserved>
 
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derekmcd

Guest
Re: Lectures Documentaries &amp; Books ( New &amp; Improved )

Has the sticky feature issue been resolved?
 
M

MeteorWayne

Guest
Re: Lectures Documentaries &amp; Books ( New &amp; Improved )

Not specifically, but I believe I can request it. Will do so.
 
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BoJangles2

Guest
Re: Lectures Documentaries &amp; Books ( New &amp; Improved )

4 New Lectures added
 
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BoJangles2

Guest
Re: NEW ++ Lectures Documentaries &amp; Books (Physics, Cosmology)

After hearing a couple of friends talk about the 2012 event id thougth id post a good debunk video
 
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derekmcd

Guest
Re: NEW ++ Lectures Documentaries &amp; Books (Physics, Cosmology)

some decent lecture here:

http://www.perimeterinstitute.ca/Outrea ... _Lectures/

I've only watched two of them. One by Wilczek which was rather generic and the other by Penrose which was rather extreme. I enjoyed both. Wilczek is a nobel laureate and Penrose is a leading authority on General Relativity. I should note that Penrose's lecture is on one of his own theories concerning pre-Big Bang. I'd like to point out that that one should not simply assume that Penrose's theory is correct based on his authoritativeness on General Relativity.

I haven't had time to watch other lectures. However, there are other very notable names here.
 
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BoJangles2

Guest
Re: NEW ++ Lectures Documentaries &amp; Books (Physics, Cosmology)

Thanks derekmcd, ive watched a couple of them, it is indeed a good resource
 
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BoJangles2

Guest
Just added another 26 more lectures from the Perimeter Instutite
 
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ZenGalacticore

Guest
Umm...hey Bojangles2. I'll chime in and say good job! But that's a sure-fire whole heap o' data to sift through. :D
 
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lukman

Guest
any site where i can have a direct download of these videos rather than watching it in the web? thanks
 
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james09ralf

Guest
Hi,

I'd like to see more documentaries. Books are good but it's nice to see what we read about once in awhile.

Regards,
James
Pret travaux
 
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