NASA's Parker Solar Probe has captured the first visible-light images of Venus

Nov 13, 2020
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The visible-light imagery will tell scientists more about the geology and minerals of Venus.

NASA's Parker Solar Probe has captured the first visible-light images of Venus : Read more
How possible is it that large ground based telescopes on the surface of Earth or space telescopes in Earth orbit including perhaps Hubble could observe Venus and see these or similiar surface of low atmosphere features on Venus in the far red end of the visible spectrum on a more regular basis?
 
How possible is it that large ground based telescopes on the surface of Earth or space telescopes in Earth orbit including perhaps Hubble could observe Venus and see these or similiar surface of low atmosphere features on Venus in the far red end of the visible spectrum on a more regular basis?

Ground based telescopes can't see the surface features of Venus because the infrared light is absorbed in our atmosphere. JWST won't be able to either, but that's because it would have to point too close to the Sun to see Venus.
 
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Ground based telescopes can't see the surface features of Venus because the infrared light is absorbed in our atmosphere. JWST won't be able to either, but that's because it would have to point too close to the Sun to see Venus.
Could ground based telescopes see Venus in the red part of the visible spectrum or could Hubble and get good images with some detail?
 
HST did image Venus in 1995, here is a view, quite a view too compared to what I see using my telescope, even at 200x with blue filter :) Venus Cloud Tops Viewed by Hubble | NASA Solar System Exploration
That's cool! The HST is capable of such imaging with some kind of on-board filter, IIRC. It imaged the Moon, IIRC, which is also not allowed normally.

I don't think we have a nice natural color image of Venus yet. Some images show it as white with some very minor fluffy structure. Other images are more yellow, brown and orange representing more of what is below the top atmosphere.

My hope, given the article's headline, was to see a color image, but "color" isn't mentioned once.

Here is a Jan 2022 article on the color of Venus that looks interesting.

Isn't it a bit strange we don't have color images for Venus? We have them for Pluto. :)
 
That's cool! The HST is capable of such imaging with some kind of on-board filter, IIRC. It imaged the Moon, IIRC, which is also not allowed normally.

I don't think we have a nice natural color image of Venus yet. Some images show it as white with some very minor fluffy structure. Other images are more yellow, brown and orange representing more of what is below the top atmosphere.

My hope, given the article's headline, was to see a color image, but "color" isn't mentioned once.

Here is a Jan 2022 article on the color of Venus that looks interesting.

Isn't it a bit strange we don't have color images for Venus? We have them for Pluto. :)
In my telescope views, especially my 90-mm refractor at 200x, depending upon the phase, Venus is generally a bland sight say compared to Jupiter with all the cloud banding visible. Using my blue planetary filter, at times I can see some cloud banding on Venus, mostly near the equator area but not like Jupiter :) When I observed Venus this month I did not use a filter and it was bright, white light to my eyes :)

Helio, when I use my #12 Yellow filter, Venus looks more yellow too, green filter can be cool too :)
 
In my telescope views, especially my 90-mm refractor at 200x, depending upon the phase, Venus is generally a bland sight say compared to Jupiter with all the cloud banding visible. Using my blue planetary filter, at times I can see some cloud banding on Venus, mostly near the equator area but not like Jupiter :) When I observed Venus this month I did not use a filter and it was bright, white light to my eyes :)
I suspect the subtle color shading on Venus will be very difficult to see from Earth due to the atmospheric effects of both turbulence and color extinctions.

It's extreme brightness, however, can be diminished by calculating the exit pupil for your lenses. If you use a shorter focal length lens that has an exit pubil that is, say, 3x of the entrance pupil (~ 6 mm for my eyes), then it will be 9x less bright. [You probably know this.]

With a cap with a hole in it, often used for viewing the bright Moon, placed at the front of the scope, one can also diminish the total light. This has a similar effect, I think, because it effectively improves the focal ratio.

Helio, when I use my #12 Yellow filter, Venus looks more yellow too, green filter can be cool too :)
:) This reminds me of the thermos joke. ;)
 
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Could ground based telescopes see Venus in the red part of the visible spectrum or could Hubble and get good images with some detail?
No surface features of Venus can be seen from ground on the Earth.
From Earth we can see all the way out to deep red but that's not good enough.
Hubble does not have infrared capability, it tops out at 600 nanometers, about where JWST picks up. This is deep red. JWST can't point at Venus. This is why Parker has taken the first pictures of surface features on Venus.
 
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No surface features of Venus can be seen from ground on the Earth.
From Earth we can see all the way out to deep red but that's not good enough.
Hubble does not have infrared capability, it tops out at 600 nanometers, about where JWST picks up. This is deep red. JWST can't point at Venus. This is why Parker has taken the first pictures of surface features on Venus.
OK, thank you. But is it because we can't see at the extreme part of the visible from Earth to see these surface features on Venus that were seen from closer range by the Parker Solar Probe or is it that we simply don't yet have large enough telescopes on Earth in these wavelengths that we can't see some of the surface features seen in visible on Venus by the Parker Solar Probe on its flyby past Venus? Also what visible wavelengths was the Parker Solar Probe focused on when it was able to get some surface detail of Venus? If an image of Venus in visible wavelengths weren't taken first or yet of Venus because we don't yet have large enough telescopes with large enough effective mirror diameter, how large a telescope or mirror diameter would a telescope in visible light even focused on the red end of the visible on Earth have to be to be able to determine some surface features on Venus?
 
By coincidence, the current S&T has an article on this. The cloud blanket is very uniform. But, due likely to convection, some bright streams can sometimes appear in the polar regions.

I still suspect some subtle color will be discovered when high Rez imaging is done in the visible range.

At least we don’t seem to be seeing as often those reddish radar renditions thrown at us for what Venus looks like. :)