• Launch Day is nearly upon us! Head over to this thread and share your thoughts before, during, and after Crew Dragon finally lifts off.

Novel propulsion method- differential linear percussion

Feb 23, 2020
22
0
10
Hi again!
I have another new space propulsion method,
this time I have tested it.
I built a carriage and put a pneumatic ram bolted to it.
I set a plane level for the carriage, which is on wheels.
I ducted 60 psi of pneumatic force to the ram on one end,
and used a regulator to step down to 7.5 psi on the other.
When this goes through a 3-port 2-position switch,
and I actuate the ram,
I can move my carriage forward around 20 mm in one cycle.
This is a perfectly feasible, and also effective space thruster afaic tell.
The drive needs to be hauled into space with a rocket I guess.
The method works because of differential velocity, at one end of the ram and the other,
it receives a different shock of energy.

This post serves as prior art, and will remain unedited

This is really easy, hope u like my thought- it seems like it works!
 
Feb 23, 2020
22
0
10
Yesterday I got more air kit coz I wanted to implicate more power, so I got 10mm air hose instead of 4mm, but the hose pulls so much on my little ram carrier, that I can't see what is happening.
It was working with the 4mm hose though. I ran it in both directions to make sure. Today I'll experiment more. I have 6mm hose that is quite flexible, I'll try that. Soon I'll put a video on You-Tube for us
 
Oct 21, 2019
246
88
160
It only appears to work on Earth due to friction. It won't work in space.
Newton's third law is: For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.
That isn't just a good idea, its the LAW.
 
Feb 23, 2020
22
0
10
Hi Mental Avenger,
thank you for the insight, regarding friction.
I have now learnt about the unproven Dean Drive.
Friction is involved, the bearing wheels and ram bore do have some.
What I propose I am trying to do here is use inertia.
The ram has a weight on it's shaft.
When it's engaged the inertia of the weight throws the carriage forward.
This results in the movement.
Less energy is used to return the ram for the next cycle,
the stroke is slower so it has less kinetic energy.
Maybe this results in net movement?
I found I can push a 1.5 kg weight 2.5mm,
with rolling car, but it bounces very much
When not hitting anything it moves around 20mm every cycle

I got more pneumatic supplies, maybe tomorrow I can film it as it is now
 
Last edited:
Feb 23, 2020
22
0
10
This one uses conventional force/energy.
It is losing energy in each cycle and would need to powered by a compressor.
However, motion is sort of perpetual in space coz if you throw an object, it will keep going until hit/gravitationally affected.
Did you watch the video?
The force is not created from nothing, it uses 60psi-
the movement gathered is from differential inertia.
An object moving fast has more kinetic energy than the same object moving slow,
is my contention

Please watch my video if you like, it is the device in practice I have just filmed
 
Oct 21, 2019
246
88
160
the movement gathered is from differential inertia.
An object moving fast has more kinetic energy than the same object moving slow, is my contention
The energy of a massive object is proportional to the square of the velocity. However, the energy to accelerate the object is also proportional to the square of the velocity, minus the friction, for a net loss.
 
Feb 23, 2020
22
0
10
thanks Mental Avenger-
I'm still grappling with the Physical concepts
I hope you liked to see my experiment in practice
It's a curious earthly drive

-so essentially the object brakes itself ineffably?


Have you read the patent TruthSeeker?
 
Jan 24, 2020
12
1
15
Particle Article, sorry for hi-jacking your thread, but I notice that you are a mechanical engineer. You know what would be dope? A pneumatic motor with permanent fixed magnets axially fixed to the casing. Then, pressurize the motor with charged air.

Its an experiment in Ionic Propulsion. Another thing for earth, but if you want to make a "cart" or a bike and you have a chemical electric battery and an air canister, you can make a hybrid system that has electric charging and a propellant.

Check out my thread in Astronomy about the UDMVT "Union's Dark Mater Vector Telescope."
 
Last edited:
Feb 23, 2020
22
0
10
hiya!
I'm not a qualified engineer,
I have briefly worked in R&D as a tech/constructor-
I can do some tasks that a machinist, technician, fitter & turner can do

I'm sorry I can't help with Ion Thrusters, here's the Wiki for us peeps->

-also I don't know anything except vaguely about Gravity Waves and Dark Matter,
You might have something though(studying with optics), as I've heard that light can be bent by gravity
Hope to see you around and I will read with interest

at the moment I am fitting the Inertia Drive to a wheel, I have made the hub.
-- it requires a rare pneumatics part called a 'rotary union'
I'm real curious to see what it does. I would be happy if it can accelerate.
 
Feb 1, 2020
79
40
60
sorry, won't work. I am an Engineer. What will happen is that your vehicle will shake back and forth then fall apart eventually. It's been done.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

Latest posts