Question Photons

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Nov 19, 2021
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They do not know where to congregate but they do know, due to their "wavelike" fuzziness, how far they are from the edge of the slit, which itself has wavelike qualities. It knows if that distance is an integral number of wavelengths thus it knows how hard to bounce off (or be attracted to) the edge of the slit. The amount it bends is also a function of the phase of the photon, or solid particle, as it passes the slit. Thus interference patterns can be causes by constructive and destructive phasing of two beams and they can be created by single photons passing through at various distances from the edge.
 
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They do not know where to congregate but they do know, due to their "wavelike" fuzziness, how far they are from the edge of the slit, which itself has wavelike qualities. It knows if that distance is an integral number of wavelengths thus it knows how hard to bounce off (or be attracted to) the edge of the slit. The amount it bends is also a function of the phase of the photon, or solid particle, as it passes the slit. Thus interference patterns can be causes by constructive and destructive phasing of two beams and they can be created by single photons passing through at various distances from the edge.
This is likely too much of a reach for me, but it sounds like the encounter of a single photon with the slit will have a random phase angle for the wave. But some phase angles will divert the photon more than others, and produce this effect. Is this guess even close?

The big mystery, apparently from a quick Google search, is that if we observe which of the two slits a photon passes, then it will behave like a particle, and no interference pattern will accumulate with multiple photons. I think this is right. [Once again I recall a certain dumb joke I'm unable to forget. :)]
 
Nov 19, 2021
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My understanding is that photons and solid particles both produce interference patterns, one slit or two, in groups or individually. Consider that a single slit has two sides to it and photons or particles bounching off either side can interfere.
 

Jzz

May 10, 2021
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If they only go through one at a time, they are obeying the HUP. They just 'decide' randomly. The 'decision' is just random.

Cat :)
This brings us to the Yang Mills theory that eventually led to the whole modern nuclear concept with its gluons and quarks and so on. The problem is that this was in itself a half baked solution. More than 10 years before Yang and Mills even met, Bethe had put forward his theory of how the hyperfine transitions in the hydrogen atom took place. Bethe's theory explicitly stated that the electron in the hydrogen atom was constantly undergoing self-interactions, by emitting and absorbing 'virtual' photons. These virtual interactions involved such low energies or infinitesimal times that they were to all purposes ignored by the macro world. Hence the term 'virtual'. This theory was later experimentally proved by Willis Lamb in the Lamb shift experiment. So what happened? Did the world and the world of physics in particular sit up and take notice? No it did not. Quantum mechanics continued with the asinine wave-particle duality assumption, ignoring experimental proof to the contrary. Bethe's theory gives substantiated proof that the electron maintains its stability around the nucleus through self interactions and not through being a wave for part of the time and a particle for part of the time. Think how different the world of physics would have been if quantum mechanics had admitted that they were wrong or even the possibility that they were wrong? The Yang Mills theory is based upon a massless medium and arcane mathematics that give form to Bethe's discovery. . Think how ridiculous it is to think that such a medium would be confined to the atom.
 
Jan 29, 2020
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The object tends to need to be the perpendicular width of the photon's wavelength to be stopped. A 500nm wavelength photon is in an Eigenstate of positions across the 500nm, even though it is only .01 angstroms wide or whatever. Soot doesn't tend to extinguish it, but micro-meteorites can. It is like the photon is using a quantum computer to move forward and you have to black nearly all the eigenstates at once to stop it or the remaining qbits reform the eigenstate after passing the atom.
 
Jan 29, 2020
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"Bethe's theory gives substantiated proof that the electron maintains its stability around the nucleus through self interactions and not through being a wave for part of the time and a particle for part of the time.".

It is a wave in certain models we use, and a particle in others. It isn't a balloon you deflate to a particle and re-inflate to waveyness while it travels forward. While it travels around a micrometeorite, if the contours of a micrometeorites are a certain angle, it will deflect or diffract. Where it makes contact you treat it as a particle, and then a diffraction wave if still going or not longer there if it absorbed.
Find a glossy table or notebook computer. Have some lighting in the room. Tilt it so the glossy surface is 2 or 3 degrees from your eye level. Light is being diffracted. You can see this effect in most 1st world offices. It is only explainable by waves as the model when you look at light first-hand.
 
Jan 29, 2020
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#31. Virtual interactions seem the default, agreed. Dismissing waviness of photons means mirages shouldn't be there. It was a university level argument with a Grade 3 argument attached to it via Grade 11 grammar. Impossible.
 

Catastrophe

"There never was a good war, or a bad peace."
Jan 29, 2020
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A Year before Voyager hit the outer planets I was reasoning with anthropology and evolutionary biology purposely ignoring what I knew to be true to try to win debates against adults. Then I chose the NASA mission future in every field. That is what Webb is supposed to be. The virtual photons have no way to curve around a well-painted wall corner even.
 

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