Refractor Telescopes

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tasco578

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Is it possible to see deep-sky through a refractor telescope? I have a Tasco with 700 mm/Focal ratio of F/12.
 
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MeteorWayne

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Since you can see several deep sky objects naked eye (andromeda Galaxy, M33, Double Cluster in Perseus), most assuredly the answer is yes.<br />Why don't you get a list of the MEssier objects and start looking for them? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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tasco578

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Thank you. I'll try to get hold of the list of MEssier objects.
 
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MeteorWayne

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I'll see if I can find a link after the eclipse. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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billslugg

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tasko578<br /><br />I went out to my father in law's hunting property in Clay County GA, and saw the Andromeda Galaxy, the Orion Nebula and Halley's comet all in the same night, all by naked eye. I believe it was in March of 1986. <br /><br />editing<br /><br />The closest town was Fort Gaines, maybe 20,000 people, about 30 miles away. There was a small light bulge on the horizon. Other than that it was stumble dark. We were bumping our heads into things. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p> </p> </div>
 
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drwayne

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There are a numberof lists like this:<br /><br />http://www.seds.org/messier/<br /><br />When I was a kid, we also ordered a copy of Norton's Star Atlas for this sort of thing.<br /><br />Generally, anything that you can do with a reflector, you can do with a refractor, with these general notes:<br /><br />(1) It is harder to go to a large aperture with a refractive based optics system - packaging of the large lenses, which must of course be mounted from the edge and cost are some factors.<br /><br />(2) Correction for abberations, such as chromatic (color) aberrations tends to lead to more expensive lens/coating systems.<br /><br />Wayne <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>"1) Give no quarter; 2) Take no prisoners; 3) Sink everything."  Admiral Jackie Fisher</p> </div>
 
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drwayne

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An historical and somewhat humorous note.<br /><br />Messier was interested in comets. The Messier list was assembled to avoid people mistaking these objects for comets.<br /><br /><img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /><br /><br />Wayne <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>"1) Give no quarter; 2) Take no prisoners; 3) Sink everything."  Admiral Jackie Fisher</p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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That way they didn't make a Mess of the observations <img src="/images/icons/rolleyes.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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5billionyearslater

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Tasco aren't really renowned for their optics. But still, you should be able to see lots of out-of-focus.<br /><br />Only kidding - good luck on your observing!
 
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