SpaceX Updates

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mr_mark

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 sorry, the link won't work for some reason. You can get to it by googling spacex lunar capability.
 
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summoner

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<p>http://www.spacex.com/FalconLunarCapabilityGuide.pdf</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Here you go, just forgot the f on the end.&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> <br /><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" style="width:271px;background-color:#FFF;border:1pxsolid#999"><tr><td colspan="2"><div style="height:35px"><img src="http://banners.wunderground.com/weathersticker/htmlSticker1/language/www/US/MT/Three_Forks.gif" alt="" height="35" width="271" style="border:0px" /></div>
 
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Boris_Badenov

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<p><font size="2"><font size="2">More updates.</font>&nbsp;</font></p><p><font size="2">They're moving the erector to The Cape. The tanks shouldn't too far behind.</font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font color="#993300"><span class="body"><font size="2" color="#3366ff"><div align="center">. </div><div align="center">Never roll in the mud with a pig. You'll both get dirty & the pig likes it.</div></font></span></font> </div>
 
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PistolPete

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<p>SpaceX has a new video up with a tour of their Pad 40 complex at The Cape.</p><p>http://spacex.com/multimedia/videos.php?id=34 </p><p>One thing that I find interesting about the SpaceX launch facility is how bare bones the facility will be compared to other facilities such as the Delta IV and Atlas V launch complexes. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><em>So, again we are defeated. This victory belongs to the farmers, not us.</em></p><p><strong>-Kambei Shimada from the movie Seven Samurai</strong></p> </div>
 
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Boris_Badenov

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>SpaceX has a new video up with a tour of their Pad 40 complex at The Cape.http://spacex.com/multimedia/videos.php?id=34. <br />Posted by PistolPete</DIV></p><p><font size="2">You beat me to it. <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-yell.gif" border="0" alt="Yell" title="Yell" /><br /><br /></font><font size="1">Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'> One thing that I find interesting about the SpaceX launch facility is how bare bones the facility will be compared to other facilities such as the Delta IV and Atlas V launch complexes. <br />Posted by PistolPete</DIV></font></p><p><font size="2">That's one of the reasons SpaceX Flights will be about 2/3 less in cost.</font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font color="#993300"><span class="body"><font size="2" color="#3366ff"><div align="center">. </div><div align="center">Never roll in the mud with a pig. You'll both get dirty & the pig likes it.</div></font></span></font> </div>
 
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Boris_Badenov

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<font size="2"><font size="2">More Updates</font>&nbsp;& cool pix too. </font> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font color="#993300"><span class="body"><font size="2" color="#3366ff"><div align="center">. </div><div align="center">Never roll in the mud with a pig. You'll both get dirty & the pig likes it.</div></font></span></font> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p class="style12"><strong>SpaceX Fulfills Commitment to Deliver Falcon 9 Hardware to Cape by Year-End in Preparation for 2009 Maiden Flight</strong></p><span class="style18"><span class="style19"><span class="style11"><strong>Hawthorne, CA &ndash; December 18, 2008 </strong>&ndash; Space Exploration Technologies Corp (SpaceX) announces the arrival of the Falcon 9 first stage flight tank at SpaceX's newest launch site, Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40), in Cape Canaveral, Florida. Arriving as scheduled, delivery of the Falcon 9 first stage fulfills SpaceX's commitment to having Falcon 9 hardware at the Cape by year-end.</span></span></span><span class="style18"> <p class="style3">"Christmas has arrived a few days early for our team at the Cape," said Brian Mosdell, Director of Florida Launch Operations for SpaceX. "The packages measure extra large this year, and they will keep everyone busy in the coming weeks."</p><p class="style3">In preparation for the launch vehicle's maiden flight in 2009, all Falcon 9 elements and ground support hardware have departed SpaceX's manufacturing facility in Hawthorne, California. The hardware is currently making its way across the United States on a dozen big rigs which will converge at the launch site over the next two weeks.</p><p class="style3">Separated into sections for travel, the major parts of the 180 foot long, 12 foot diameter rocket included nine Merlin 1C engines mounted on a massive engine mount structure; a thrust skirt that transfers the force of the engines into the first stage propellant tank; a carbon composite interstage; a new Merlin Vacuum upper stage engine fitted to the second stage propellant tank; and the two halves of a 17 foot diameter payload fairing&mdash;large enough to enclose a school bus.</p><p class="style3">The prelaunch fitting will include a mix of both flight ready and qualification hardware which will undergo final integration at the launch site in a horizontal position, and then be raised to vertical on the custom built erector.</p><p class="style3">Arrival of Falcon 9 hardware at the Cape represents yet another critical milestone in a year of significant accomplishments for SpaceX. On November 22nd, the company successfully conducted a full mission-length firing of the Falcon 9, validating SpaceX's design which uses nine engines on the first stage. </p><p class="style3">In addition, SpaceX has been rapidly upgrading SLC-40 into a state-of-the-art launch facility which will serve as a gateway to a new era in commercial space operations. Located on the Florida space coast, just south of NASA's launch site for all Apollo moon missions and Space Shuttle flights, SLC-40 is a world class heavy lift launch facility, capable of supporting Falcon 9 and future Falcon 9 Heavy missions, as well as cargo and crew carrying missions using the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft.</p><p class="style3">"2008 has been a year of rapid progress for SpaceX," said Elon Musk, CEO and CTO of SpaceX. "The delivery of the Falcon 9 to the Cape is a major milestone in designing and deploying the most reliable, cost-efficient fleet of launch vehicles in the world. I applaud our SpaceX team who has worked 24/7 to make this happen." </p><p class="style3">SpaceX currently has four Falcon 9 flights on the manifest for 2009, two of which are demonstration flights with the Dragon spacecraft as part of the NASA Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) competition. Under this agreement, SpaceX will conduct a total of three flights of its Falcon 9/Dragon system to demonstrate cargo delivery capabilities to the International Space Station (ISS). At the option of NASA, the agreement can be extended to include demonstrating transport of crew to and from the ISS. The Falcon 9 will be the first vehicle since the Saturn V and Saturn 1 to have the ability to lose any engine/motor and still be able to complete its mission without loss of crew or spacecraft.</p><p class="style3">A video tour of SpaceX launch facilities at SLC-40, Cape Canaveral AFS, led by Elon Musk, can be found at the SpaceX website: www.spacex.com.</p></span> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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shuttle_guy

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>SpaceX Fulfills Commitment to Deliver Falcon 9 Hardware to Cape by Year-End in Preparation for 2009 Maiden FlightHawthorne, CA &ndash; December 18, 2008 &ndash; Space Exploration Technologies Corp (SpaceX) announces the arrival of the Falcon 9 first stage flight tank at SpaceX's newest launch site, Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40), in Cape Canaveral, Florida. Arriving as scheduled, delivery of the Falcon 9 first stage fulfills SpaceX's commitment to having Falcon 9 hardware at the Cape by year-end. "Christmas has arrived a few days early for our team at the Cape," said Brian Mosdell, Director of Florida Launch Operations for SpaceX. "The packages measure extra large this year, and they will keep everyone busy in the coming weeks."In preparation for the launch vehicle's maiden flight in 2009, all Falcon 9 elements and ground support hardware have departed SpaceX's manufacturing facility in Hawthorne, California. The hardware is currently making its way across the United States on a dozen big rigs which will converge at the launch site over the next two weeks.Separated into sections for travel, the major parts of the 180 foot long, 12 foot diameter rocket included nine Merlin 1C engines mounted on a massive engine mount structure; a thrust skirt that transfers the force of the engines into the first stage propellant tank; a carbon composite interstage; a new Merlin Vacuum upper stage engine fitted to the second stage propellant tank; and the two halves of a 17 foot diameter payload fairing&mdash;large enough to enclose a school bus.The prelaunch fitting will include a mix of both flight ready and qualification hardware which will undergo final integration at the launch site in a horizontal position, and then be raised to vertical on the custom built erector.Arrival of Falcon 9 hardware at the Cape represents yet another critical milestone in a year of significant accomplishments for SpaceX. On November 22nd, the company successfully conducted a full mission-length firing of the Falcon 9, validating SpaceX's design which uses nine engines on the first stage. In addition, SpaceX has been rapidly upgrading SLC-40 into a state-of-the-art launch facility which will serve as a gateway to a new era in commercial space operations. Located on the Florida space coast, just south of NASA's launch site for all Apollo moon missions and Space Shuttle flights, SLC-40 is a world class heavy lift launch facility, capable of supporting Falcon 9 and future Falcon 9 Heavy missions, as well as cargo and crew carrying missions using the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft."2008 has been a year of rapid progress for SpaceX," said Elon Musk, CEO and CTO of SpaceX. "The delivery of the Falcon 9 to the Cape is a major milestone in designing and deploying the most reliable, cost-efficient fleet of launch vehicles in the world. I applaud our SpaceX team who has worked 24/7 to make this happen." SpaceX currently has four Falcon 9 flights on the manifest for 2009, two of which are demonstration flights with the Dragon spacecraft as part of the NASA Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) competition. Under this agreement, SpaceX will conduct a total of three flights of its Falcon 9/Dragon system to demonstrate cargo delivery capabilities to the International Space Station (ISS). At the option of NASA, the agreement can be extended to include demonstrating transport of crew to and from the ISS. The Falcon 9 will be the first vehicle since the Saturn V and Saturn 1 to have the ability to lose any engine/motor and still be able to complete its mission without loss of crew or spacecraft.A video tour of SpaceX launch facilities at SLC-40, Cape Canaveral AFS, led by Elon Musk, can be found at the SpaceX website: www.spacex.com. <br />Posted by MeteorWayne</DIV></p><p>All of the Falcon 9 flight vehicle will be at Complex 40 by the end of next week. I updated a old thread on this vehicle in the Missions and Launches section. They should be able to do a static test in the spring and attempt a launch soon after if all goes well.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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ThereIWas2

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Am I correct that the nine 1st stage engines to be used on the first launch are the same ones tested in Texas, and that only the 2nd stage "vacuum Merlin" will never have been fired before?<br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><span class="postbody"><span style="font-style:italic"><br /></span></span></p> </div>
 
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Boris_Badenov

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Am I correct that the nine 1st stage engines to be used on the first launch are the same ones tested in Texas, and that only the 2nd stage "vacuum Merlin" will never have been fired before? <br />Posted by ThereIWas2</DIV></p><p><font size="2">That is the way I understand it.<br /><br /></font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font color="#993300"><span class="body"><font size="2" color="#3366ff"><div align="center">. </div><div align="center">Never roll in the mud with a pig. You'll both get dirty & the pig likes it.</div></font></span></font> </div>
 
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shuttle_guy

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Am I correct that the nine 1st stage engines to be used on the first launch are the same ones tested in Texas, and that only the 2nd stage "vacuum Merlin" will never have been fired before? <br />Posted by ThereIWas2</DIV></p><p>The second stage engine will be tested in a Space X developed altitude chamber.<br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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Swampcat

Guest
<table border="0" cellpadding="10" width="600"><tbody><tr><td><p class="style3" align="left"><img src="http://www.spacex.com/00Graphics/spacex_logo_small.jpg" border="0" alt="SpaceX Logo" /> </p><p class="style3 style11" align="left"><span class="style12"><strong>FALCON 9 TO BE FULLY INTEGRATED BY DECEMBER 31</strong><br /></span></p><div><span class="hr1"><hr /></span><p class="style3"><strong>Monday, December 22nd, 2008</strong></p><p class="style3">Yesterday we lifted the first stage off the shipping truck and lowered it onto the integration assemblies (shown below). With all of the F9 hardware currently at or on its way to the Cape, <strong>we are on track for a fully integrated launch vehicle by year's end</strong>.</p><p class="style3">Barring any unforeseen delays, the second stage and fairing are expected to arrive at the Cape by December 28th and will be mated on December 31st, just in time for the New Year.</p><p class="style3">The erector is also on track towards operational status in early January, with the base assembly to be aligned and tacked by December 26th and welding to be complete early in the New Year. Hold down assemblies are expected to arrive shortly after the New Year and with our ground control system at SLC-40 currently operational, <strong>it's just a matter of days before F9 is vertical at the Cape.</strong> </p><p class="style3">&mdash;Elon&mdash; </p><p align="center"><img src="http://www.spacex.com/assets/img/122208-cranes2.jpg" alt="" width="640" height="480" /></p><em>Lifting the first stage off the shipping truck and lowering onto the integration assemblies <br /></em><em><p align="center"><strong>Click here for the full update on F9 progress at the Cape. </strong></p></em></div>
 
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windnwar

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The new pics are great. It's all coming together well. I can't wait till the first test firing on the pad there! <br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font size="2" color="#0000ff">""Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former." --Albert Einstein"</font></p> </div>
 
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Boris_Badenov

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<p><font size="2"><font size="2">SpaceX and Orbital win huge CRS contract from NASA</font></font></p><p><font size="2">SpaceX and Orbital Sciences Corporation have been awarded the lucrative Commercial Resupply Services (CRS) contract, worth up to $3.5 billion, with SpaceX (Space Exploration Technologies Corp.) winning around 60 percent of the award - equating to 12 missions, with Orbital winning another eight missions. PlanetSpace Inc lose out on the award.</font></p><div class="clear"></div><p><span></span></p><p><font size="2">The CRS contract deals with the resupply needs of the International Space Station (ISS) after the shuttle retires. However, with a </font><font size="2" color="#0066cc">decision date coming within the next few months on extending shuttle to 2012</font><font size="2">, there remains the possibility that there could be a deferral of a quantity of CRS related launches until 2013. The contracts themselves would not be altered, should NASA decide to extend shuttle.</font></p><p><font size="2">The award from NASA orders eight flights valued at about $1.9 billion from Orbital and 12 flights valued at about $1.6 billion from SpaceX.</font></p><p><font size="2">Working on the premise of shuttle retirement in 2010, NASA needed to find a solution to launching up to 200,000 lbs of cargo to the ISS, without the hefty upmass of the shuttle.</font></p><p><font size="2">The CRS contract - part of the Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) program, with funding coming from NASA&rsquo;s Space Act agreements - will cover at least 44,000 pounds of that requirement, joining with the cargo fleet of vehicles such as the European ATV, Japanese HTV and Russian Progress.</font></p><p><font size="2">With Tuesday&rsquo;s award, that fleet is being joined by two new launch systems from SpaceX, based in California, and Orbital Sciences Corp, based in Dulles, Va - well known for their Pegasus launch system and Minotaur family.</font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font color="#993300"><span class="body"><font size="2" color="#3366ff"><div align="center">. </div><div align="center">Never roll in the mud with a pig. You'll both get dirty & the pig likes it.</div></font></span></font> </div>
 
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windnwar

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<p>Wow, way to go to both SpaceX and Orbital. The pad integration is moving along rapidly as well I see. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font size="2" color="#0000ff">""Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former." --Albert Einstein"</font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p class="style12"><strong>F9/Dragon Will Replace the Cargo Transport Function of the Space Shuttle after 2010</strong></p><span class="style18"><span class="style19"><span class="style11"><strong>Hawthorne, CA &ndash; December 23, 2008 </strong>&ndash; NASA today announced its selection of the SpaceX Falcon 9 launch vehicle and Dragon spacecraft for the International Space Station (ISS) Cargo Resupply Services (CRS) contract award. The contract is for a guaranteed minimum of 20,000 kg to be carried to the International Space Station. The firm contracted value is $1.6 billion and NASA may elect to order additional missions for a cumulative total contract value of up to $3.1 billion.</span></span></span><span class="style18"> <p class="style3">"The SpaceX team is honored to have been selected by NASA as the winner of the Cargo Resupply Services contract," said Elon Musk, CEO and CTO, SpaceX. "This is a tremendous responsibility, given the swiftly approaching retirement of the Space Shuttle and the significant future needs of the Space Station. This also demonstrates the success of the NASA COTS program, which has opened a new era for NASA in US Commercial spaceflight."</p><p class="style3">Under the CRS contract, SpaceX will deliver pressurized and unpressurized cargo to the ISS, and return cargo back to Earth. Cargo may include both NASA and NASA-sponsored payloads requiring a pressurized or unpressurized environment. SpaceX will provide the necessary services, test hardware and software, and mission-specific elements to integrate cargo with the Dragon delivery capsule.</p><p class="style3">In 2006, SpaceX was named a winner under NASA's Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) competition. Under the existing COTS agreement, SpaceX will conduct the first flight of its Falcon 9 launch vehicle and Dragon spacecraft in 2009. The final flight, currently scheduled for 2010, will demonstrate Dragon's ability to berth with the ISS.</p><p class="style3">Falcon 9 flight hardware has already started to arrive at the SpaceX launch site, Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral, in preparation for Falcon 9 going vertical on the pad within a few weeks. Construction of the SLC-40 launch site is proceeding ahead of schedule and is estimated to be completed in early 2009.</p></span> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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docm

Guest
<p>I read somewhere that Orbital's Taurus II and its Cygnus spacecraft will not fly until at least Q4 2010.&nbsp; By that time F9 may have a considerable flight history.</p><p>Also: with Ukranian engines &&nbsp;1st stage and with Cygnus being Italian how does Orbital meet the 50% US content?</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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windnwar

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I read somewhere that Orbital's Taurus II and its Cygnus spacecraft will not fly until at least Q4 2010.&nbsp; By that time F9 may have a considerable flight history.Also: with Ukranian engines &&nbsp;1st stage and with Cygnus being Italian how does Orbital meet the 50% US content? <br />Posted by docm</DIV><br /><br />Everything i've seen on this basically says they can submit for a classification and it is basically up to the board to say if its 50% or not, whether or not it really is. The tank and cargo are foriegn, the engine while being foriegn, has a U.S. license for production, and the avionics and upper stage are U.S. as well. That being said I guess you could call it either way. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font size="2" color="#0000ff">""Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former." --Albert Einstein"</font></p> </div>
 
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Swampcat

Guest
This probably belongs in its own thread, but I'm kinda psyched about the OSC award as they will fly out of MARS (Mid Atlantic Regional Spaceport) at Wallops Island, VA, which is less than a two hour drive from home for me. These Taurus II/Cygnus flights could be my best chance at seeing large rockets lift off. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font size="3" color="#ff9900"><p><font size="1" color="#993300"><strong><em>------------------------------------------------------------------- </em></strong></font></p><p><font size="1" color="#993300"><strong><em>"I hold it that a little rebellion now and then is a good thing, and as necessary in the political world as storms in the physical. Unsuccessful rebellions, indeed, generally establish the encroachments on the rights of the people which have produced them. An observation of this truth should render honest republican governors so mild in their punishment of rebellions as not to discourage them too much. It is a medicine necessary for the sound health of government."</em></strong></font></p><p><font size="1" color="#993300"><strong>Thomas Jefferson</strong></font></p></font> </div>
 
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Boris_Badenov

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<p><font size="7">WOOHOO!!!</font></p><p><font size="2"><font size="2">This</font> SPACE ACT AGREEMENT AMENDMENT TWO, between NASA & SpaceX includes a decription of milestones for Capability D. </font></p><p><font size="2">If Capability D is given the 'Go Ahead" we could see the first Crew Demo Flight in June 2010.</font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font color="#993300"><span class="body"><font size="2" color="#3366ff"><div align="center">. </div><div align="center">Never roll in the mud with a pig. You'll both get dirty & the pig likes it.</div></font></span></font> </div>
 
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docm

Guest
That's a big IF now, but&nbsp;my read is&nbsp;the next administration has COTS as a priority. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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job1207

Guest
<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>That's a big IF now, but&nbsp;my read is&nbsp;the next administration has COTS as a priority. <br /> Posted by docm</DIV></p><p>Reading that agreement, they don't get through with the paper reviews on the crew flights for another&nbsp; couple of years. June 2011, through 2012 are there crew prep flights. After that, I would think the crew would fly.&nbsp; </p><p>&nbsp;</p>
 
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Boris_Badenov

Guest
Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Reading that agreement, they don't get through with the paper reviews on the crew flights for another&nbsp; couple of years. June 2011, through 2012 are there crew prep flights. After that, I would think the crew would fly.&nbsp; &nbsp; <br />Posted by job1207</DIV><br /><br /><font size="2">Your right. I misread it. The first crewed flight would be in June 2011.</font> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font color="#993300"><span class="body"><font size="2" color="#3366ff"><div align="center">. </div><div align="center">Never roll in the mud with a pig. You'll both get dirty & the pig likes it.</div></font></span></font> </div>
 
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job1207

Guest
well, they are three crew prep flights. I think that means no crew. I am pretty sure. After that then guys and gals can ride, I would think .
 
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