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Still on telescopes.

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pioneer0333

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Why not place a telescope in geostationary orbit behind the moon? You could use smaller satellites to relay signals to and from Earth and the telescope to operate it.<br /> I am just thinking that the increased darkness will allow for more light gathering capabilities.<br /><br />Please reply. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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bad_drawing

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The moon is much further away then a geostationary orbit. Plus remember that the far side of the moon does not mean the same thing as the dark side of the moon. (for example, when its a new moon and its invisible to us, the far side is bathed in sunlight) I understand your concept and its not a bad idea, but if perpetual darkness is what your after for observing perhaps a deep rimmed polar lunar crater where sunlight never reaches into its base would better serve the purpose, but then you'd be limited on what part of the sky you could observe.
 
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bad_drawing

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This is very true. In fact, Is there any reason why a moon based scope would be better than a space based scope? I can't help but think that a space based scope would be superior to a scope of similar capabilities on the moon. With some good shielding you could view virtually any part of the sky...sure you might have to wait a few months to view things "behind" the sun, but thats still better than being limited to a hemisphere. It also seems that in space your objective could be as big as you want since it won't sag or distort due to its own weight ( providing you could launch or assemble it without damaging it)
 
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