Voyager 2 - Images?

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qso1

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The link does not allow me in. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong>My borrowed quote for the time being:</strong></p><p><em>There are three kinds of people in life. Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen...and those who do not know what happened.</em></p> </div>
 
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qso1

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I mentioned the parallax thing because I actually use this idea in one of my graphic novels. The first unmanned interstellar probes take these kinds of measurements to refine the distances to stars for planned future manned interstellar ships. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong>My borrowed quote for the time being:</strong></p><p><em>There are three kinds of people in life. Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen...and those who do not know what happened.</em></p> </div>
 
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richalex

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<blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>Voyager is of historic interest only.<p><hr /></p></p></blockquote>We are still getting scientific data from them.
 
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qso1

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Thanks, this link worked.<br /><br />At first glance, I would say this is a cropped version of the wide field image and the fainter dot is one of the other planets that just happens to be in the field of view.<br /><br />I won't be able to confirm this until I look at the wide fields. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong>My borrowed quote for the time being:</strong></p><p><em>There are three kinds of people in life. Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen...and those who do not know what happened.</em></p> </div>
 
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qso1

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Thanks, I'd looked at that one before but its kind of hard to see much of anything as far as exact position of the dots. I probably won't be able to determine with a high degree of certainty what the faint dot is but I'll keep looking. I can use Starry Night when I get home to see what the planetary positions were on the date the image was made so I can rule out or say with some certainty that it was one of the other planets. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong>My borrowed quote for the time being:</strong></p><p><em>There are three kinds of people in life. Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen...and those who do not know what happened.</em></p> </div>
 
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3488

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View from Voyager 1: Wednesday 14th February 1990.<br /><br />From Voyager 1, the Sun appeared in northern Eridanus, near the border <br />with Lepus.<br /><br />90 Degrees.<br /><br />20 Degrees.<br /><br />5 Degrees.<br /><br />2 Degrees.<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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