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Question What about the flat earth International Conference coming?

rod

Oct 22, 2019
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Interesting, we have another FEIC taking place this month. Dallas TX, 14-15 November, flat earth international conference coming
I have seen many flat earth videos (since 2016), especially those teaching *astronomy* :) Any thoughts from the community on flat earth astronomy teaching?
 

rod

Oct 22, 2019
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Okay, here are some thoughts from me concerning flat earth astronomy teaching. After watching more than several dozen videos, I find some common themes presented in the flat earth community concerning astronomy.

1. Geocentric - The flat earth is immovable. Flat earth is geocentric astronomy.
2. Gravity - there is no such thing as gravity (I was surprised to discover this teaching).
3. Stellar parallax - there is no such thing as stellar parallax. Many stars are claimed to show negative values (this is correct in some cases), thus the flat earth is not moving around the Sun but immovable.
4. Total lunar eclipses are not caused by the Moon passing through the earth's circular shadow.
5. Heliocentric solar system astronomy is completely false, i.e. *fake news*.
6. All distances to heavenly bodies are much closer than modern astronomy teaches, e.g. there are no stars thousands, millions, or billions of light-years distance. I found the flat earth geocentric astronomy concept similar to Claudius Ptolemy geocentric astronomy and Tycho Brahe - concerning distances to various bodies in the *firmament*.
7. There are flat moon videos too featuring a translucent Moon.
 

rod

Oct 22, 2019
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newtons_laws, good reminder about the 2020 cruise for FE folks. Yesterday I was able to observe the entire 5.5 hour Mercury transit using my telescope with solar filter (great fun). The FES have their Sun wiki. The Sun is 32-miles in diameter and 3,000 miles above the flat earth disk. Some citizen science groups measured the Mercury parallax and solar parallax yesterday during the transit (just like 2004, 2012, and 2016 Mercury transit). When published, the distances for Mercury and the Sun from Earth - I think will be very different than the conference teachings :)
 

rod

Oct 22, 2019
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Today is the first day of the conference. I did view the Mercury transit on 11-Nov. Here is a thought from me on flat earth astronomy teaching after viewing the Mercury transit. [The Sun when I viewed at 71x with 1-degree true FOV, was close to 1938" angular size. Mercury disk silhouette near 10" angular size. At mid-point near 1019 EST, I could easily see Mercury near center of Sun in the FOV and the Sun's, nearly 194x larger angular size. FES Sun wiki claims the Sun is 32-miles in diameter and 3,000 miles above the flat disk earth. The Mercury transit is a great event to ask some questions about what flat earth folks claim about the size and distance of the Sun. Just how far away was Mercury? What is the size of Mercury? How much farther away from Mercury was the Sun? How large is the Sun? Both bodies were clearly visible in my telescope views. https://wiki.tfes.org/Sun, "The Sun is a revolving sphere. It has a diameter of 32 miles and is located approximately 3000 miles above the surface of the Earth"]
 

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