What star is this?

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Space_Goose

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Hi guys,

I live in Ireland and the last several nights have been unusually clear. I have noticed the last two nights a very bright star to the left of the constilation of Orion and slightly below it. It is brighter than any star in the Orion constilation by loads and twinkles more than any star i have ever seen. It even seems to change colors as it twinkles going from red to blue to green sometimes. Just courious what star this could be.

Thanks.
 
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origin

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Space_Goose":1dxbjxwz said:
Hi guys,

I live in Ireland and the last several nights have been unusually clear. I have noticed the last two nights a very bright star to the left of the constilation of Orion and slightly below it. It is brighter than any star in the Orion constilation by loads and twinkles more than any star i have ever seen. It even seems to change colors as it twinkles going from red to blue to green sometimes. Just courious what star this could be.

Thanks.
Looks like it is Sirius to me. It should be pretty low, near the horizon - right?
 
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Space_Goose

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Well I wouldn't say it is near the horizon but it is definatly lower in the sky than the bottom most stars of Orion and the moon. It is not down near the Horizon though. I know the moons location is relative to where you are on earth but here in Ireland, the star is about equal distance between the Moon and Orion. It is only slightly lower than the bottom most stars of Orion.
 
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origin

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Space_Goose":1r26ykrn said:
Well I wouldn't say it is near the horizon but it is definatly lower in the sky than the bottom most stars of Orion and the moon. It is not down near the Horizon though. I know the moons location is relative to where you are on earth but here in Ireland, the star is about equal distance between the Moon and Orion. It is only slightly lower than the bottom most stars of Orion.
Well sirius is below and to the left of oriion and sirius is 'famous' for it's twinkling and color changes so unless someone has a better idea that certainly seems to be the culprit.
 
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Space_Goose

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I looked it up and I thing it just might be Sirius. I think it might be because Ireland is so far north but Orion its self is almost straight up in the southern sky, Almost that is. Betelgeuse is almost straight up here. So that might cause Sirius to be a little further up in the sky.
 
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MeteorWayne

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Yes, sounds like Sirius. You probably had a cold front pass through recently, that's why it's so clear, and why Sirius is twinkling so much. Where in Ireland are you located (nearest big city so I can fnd it on my SkyMap program). Orion isn't as high as you yhink it is, even Betelgeuse doesn't come very close to overhead. But I can give more details if you refine your location and the time when you are seeing Sirius.
 
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Space_Goose

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Hi MeteorWayne, Try the town of Killarney. It should be big enough to show up on most programs. If not Killarney then try Tralee. I live in County Kerry at the very least. If not Tralee then the nearest big city to me would be Cork. I have just never noticed this star before with the weather being cloady most of the time. I am actually noticing a lot of stars/objects that I have never noticed before, even a light that doesn't twinkle that shows up near the moon. I figure it must either be Venus or the International Space Stations considering how big and bright it is in the sky. I think you are indeed correct about the cold front. I am enjoying the chance to star gaze though.
 
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duluthdave

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Space_Goose":2nbn0bkd said:
I am actually noticing a lot of stars/objects that I have never noticed before, even a light that doesn't twinkle that shows up near the moon. I figure it must either be Venus or the International Space Stations considering how big and bright it is in the sky.
The light you're seeing near the moon is probably Mars. If it were the space station, you could see it moving. The ISS is only visible for a few minutes at a time, and moves across a large portion of the sky during that time. About the bright star you're seeing, I agree with origin. It sounds like you're describing Sirius. Have fun stargazing. It's a great way to spend a night.
 
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MeteorWayne

Guest
Hi Space Goose, yes that's close enough. Betelgeuse (the upper left shoulder reddish bright star in Orion) reaches it's highest elevation for you of 45 degrees at about 11:38 PM. At that time, Sirius is 20 degrees above the horizon, so that's well in the "twinkle zone". In general star twinkle more the closer they are to the horizon (more atmosphere to pass through), though under really unstable conditions, even stars close to the zenith (like 0 magnitude Capella at 81 degrees elevation) can twinkle.
 
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Space_Goose

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Thanks Everyone. I have certainly enjoyed all the star gazing i have been doing over the past several nights. We had another clear night tonight. We don't get much clear whether here so I am enjoying it while I can. duluthdave, after you said Mars, I looked at the object again tonight and last night threw bionoculars. I don't have a telescope as I would hardly ever be able to use it with the whether. Threw the Binoculars it does appear to have a SLIGHT reddish hue. So you may indeed be right about Mars. That might just be my imagination though :) MeteorWayne, if you don't mind me asking. Which skymap program do you use?
 
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MeteorWayne

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I use SkyMap Pro because it's very intense with accuracy, but it ain't cheap. There are free options online that are adequate for most circumstances.

Glad to hear you've had some clear nites! One of my meteor buddies moved from Belgium to Ireland....he will be doing less meteor observing for sure! :)
 
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3488

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Photo I took a while back myself in Ashford, Kent, United Kingdom.

Orion was due south, Lepus directly beneath. Orion's Belt pointing to the lower left to Sirius.


Full size image here.

Andrew Brown.
 
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