Will Betelgeuse Finally Explode? A Look at the Dimming Red Star in Orion's Shoulder

Jan 3, 2020
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It isn't really relevant, but I chose to use the explosion of Betelgeuse as the main plotline in one of my hard science fiction books called Mindslip. Just shows that real life can be stranger than fiction. Hope the results in my story don't come true! LOL,
 
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rod

Oct 22, 2019
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It isn't really relevant, but I chose to use the explosion of Betelgeuse as the main plotline in one of my hard science fiction books called Mindslip. Just shows that real life can be stranger than fiction. Hope the results in my story don't come true! LOL,
FYI. The study of red supergiant stars exploding as supernovae, was shown to have real problems in 1987 when SN 1987A became visible to instruments on Earth. The progenitor star was not a red supergiant but blue giant star. Stellar evolution modeling has some kinks that are being worked on today. I offer no prophecy here about the future of Betelgeuse :)
 
Jan 3, 2020
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Thanks for that info, Rod. If you'd like a free copy of Mindslip, send your email address to tony @ harmsworth.net, cheers.
 

Vaz

Jan 5, 2020
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Much as it would be brilliant to see (excuse the pun), I don't care all that much about it. My interests when it comes to space lie more on the planet Venus and Barnards Star.
 
Jan 6, 2020
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I'm wondering if there could be any habitable worlds around Betelgeuse, and if so, what would be their fate should it explode?
 

Vaz

Jan 5, 2020
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It wouldn't be good. depending on how close the planets orbited, to the star in it's red giant phase, theyd either be vaporised or flung off into deep space to become what is called a rogue planet. When it comes to habitable worlds, sorry but they don't have a hope in hell. Doesn't matter how far away the planet is from a red giant, when that goes boom, the explosion will tear it apart. But any life on such a planet wouldn't need worry about that, as the intense radiation given off from Betelguese will have baked the planet surface and killed every thing long before the star explodes anyway.
 
Jan 6, 2020
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I'm wondering if there could be any habitable worlds around Betelgeuse, and if so, what would be their fate should it explode?
That would be pretty hard on the reinsurance marketplace.
I hope that none of my financial instruments have any exposure.
 
Jan 7, 2020
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Betelgeuse is dimming, which could mean that it's about to explode. But scientists aren't convinced it's ready to blow.

Will Betelgeuse Finally Explode? A Look at the Dimming Red Star in Orion's Shoulder : Read more
Here is the real question. Is it a recurrent nova and what are the characteristics? As far as I know we keep finding more, so I have little faith in any of the mainstream star life cycles. Electric Universe seems to be most correct or at least nowhere near as incorrect as Relativity.
 
Jan 7, 2020
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FYI. The study of red supergiant stars exploding as supernovae, was shown to have real problems in 1987 when SN 1987A became visible to instruments on Earth. The progenitor star was not a red supergiant but blue giant star. Stellar evolution modeling has some kinks that are being worked on today. I offer no prophecy here about the future of Betelgeuse :)
They ignore recurrent nova and the fact that black holes do not create gravitational lensing required by the big bang cosmology models. Why would they update anything or even consider they are wrong? Dark matter and dark energy (seriously just call it magic) are nowhere to be found. My personal favorite source for an actual experiment that breaks things SAFIRE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DTaXfbvGf8E
 
Feb 11, 2020
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I'm wondering if there could be any habitable worlds around Betelgeuse, and if so, what would be their fate should it explode.
No. Betelgeuse is a red GIANT which photosphere engulfs the equivalent of the orbit of Jupiter - ALL of the Goldilocks Zone.
 
Jan 3, 2020
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They're also very young stars usually. I'm writing a novel about Trappist-1 at the moment. The opposite extreme, ultracool star, but with five or six planets in the Goldilocks zone and perhaps twice the age of the solar system.
 
Feb 12, 2020
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No. Betelgeuse is a red GIANT which photosphere engulfs the equivalent of the orbit of Jupiter - ALL of the Goldilocks Zone.
All stars, even those 500 times larger in diameter than the sun have goldilocks zones, it simply has to do with the radiant heat produced by the star, and at what distance a planet would maintain liquid water over most of it's surface, our Sun is kinda smallish as stars go, so the zone in our solar system starts at about 88 million miles from the sun, and continues to about 155 million
 
Feb 14, 2020
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Wouldn't we know if the star was going to explode "in our lifetime" by looking at it with one of our big satellite telescopes? You would think we could get a pretty decent "heads up" by looking into all those years in the past to see if it is still there or see the explosion brightness coming a long way in advance. I doubt it will explode in my lifetime because I think it would be awesome to see & I don't get lucky enough to get to see something that cool LOL
 

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