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Are Black Holes Really That Massive?



Did you know that at the center of nearly every galaxy, there’s a supermassive black hole lurking? Supermassive conjures up scary images of a hulking mass, which isn’t too far off. But we always hear about how black holes are basically an incredible amount of mass shoved into an incredibly small space. Considering that, how massive can they be, really?



1. Let’s first define massive.
Massive means different things depending on the context. In terms of Earth-scale, we usually call something massive if it’s really big. For example, elephants are massive. The Eiffel Tower is massive. But in space, the meaning changes. The word massive refers to how much mass something has. Mass means how much matter something has (how much physical stuff).

2. In that sense, here’s how massive it has to be.
In order for a black hole to form, there has to be a certain amount of mass. This is because black holes are characterized by their ability to pull in light and stop it from escaping, which requires a large amount of mass condensed into a small area in order to create the kind of gravitational force to grab light. The average mass of black holes that we’ve studied is between 3 and 10 solar masses. One solar mass is equal to 2x10^3 kg, which is the mass of our Sun.

3. Putting that in perspective.
Let’s consider a small black hole of 3 solar masses. Imagine the same amount of mass as three of our suns combined, all crammed into a singularity, a teeny tiny point in space. That’s pretty darn massive, and that’s a small black hole. Supermassive black holes are around 100,000 solar masses.
 
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rod

Oct 22, 2019
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"One solar mass is equal to 2x10^3 kg, which is the mass of our Sun."

In kilograms, the Sun's mass is 2x10^30 kg. A black hole of 3 solar masses, Schwarzschild radius = 8.86 km.
 
Feb 18, 2020
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"One solar mass is equal to 2x10^3 kg, which is the mass of our Sun."

Yes, that's what it says. The Sun weighs 2,000 kg = 2 tonnes.
I don't think so! Add to 0 after the 3 and you get:
2 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 000 kg

Thanks to Rod for pointing out the error.
 
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rod

Oct 22, 2019
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Catastrophe, dfjcehm721 et al. A small size for the Sun does work. It all works in flat earth astronomy :) I have studied flat earth astronomy since 2016 when I first encountered the claims. The Sun at 31-32 arcminutes size moving above the flat disk earth at 5,000 km, the diameter could be 46 km size. The same for the Moon. A galaxy 1 arcminutes size at 100E+6 pc, is about 95,000 LY diameter. If much closer, a very small galaxy indeed :)

We may need to change how we think the universe works :) In flat earth cosmology, everything is much closer, smaller, and SMBHs are not real, there is no gravity too :)

Enjoy :)---Rod
 
Feb 18, 2020
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Rod,

""One solar mass is equal to 2x10^3 kg, which is the mass of our Sun.""

Was it not just an innocent typo? Surely no one would suggest that a "solar mass" is 2 tonnes?

Wiki gives
"The solar mass (M☉) is a standard unit of mass in astronomy, equal to approximately 2×1030 kg. It is used to indicate the masses of other stars, as well as clusters, nebulae, and galaxies. It is equal to the mass of the Sun (denoted by the solar symbol ⊙︎)."
My emphasis

Cat :)
 
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Aug 21, 2020
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Here is new a theory about black holes.
what if black holes are tears in the universe due to the high mass of the star.
tears that causes the pull that traps even light into it?
 
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Nov 6, 2020
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www.quora.com


Did you know that at the center of nearly every galaxy, there’s a supermassive black hole lurking? Supermassive conjures up scary images of a hulking mass, which isn’t too far off. But we always hear about how black holes are basically an incredible amount of mass shoved into an incredibly small space. Considering that, how massive can they be, really?



1. Let’s first define massive.
Massive means different things depending on the context. In terms of Earth-scale, we usually call something massive if it’s really big. For example, elephants are massive. The Eiffel Tower is massive. But in space, the meaning changes. The word massive refers to how much mass something has. Mass means how much matter something has (how much physical stuff).

2. In that sense, here’s how massive it has to be.
In order for a black hole to form, there has to be a certain amount of mass. This is because black holes are characterized by their ability to pull in light and stop it from escaping, which requires a large amount of mass condensed into a small area in order to create the kind of gravitational force to grab light. The average mass of black holes that we’ve studied is between 3 and 10 solar masses. One solar mass is equal to 2x10^3 kg, which is the mass of our Sun.

3. Putting that in perspective.
Let’s consider a small black hole of 3 solar masses. Imagine the same amount of mass as three of our suns combined, all crammed into a singularity, a teeny tiny point in space. That’s pretty darn massive, and that’s a small black hole. Supermassive black holes are around 100,000 solar masses.
You are right about black hole are extremley so massive. But do you know also that these massive masses tend to infinity around their spherical center singularity "that defines infinity smaller distance epsilon scale shell where inifnity masses around outside out to be inside inverted as a spherical hole and nothing is inside, it is a hole". The black hole for me is like a Hole inside the universe where there is no space no time inside not even it absorbs the light by extreme gravity because Light is more powerful than gravity and Light photons are the commander of the electrons "light creates the matter", and I think that Light comes to the black hole and eats the darkness inside to make its loop trajectory cycle from the event horizon to its Quasar tunnel. So inside-out you will find the tunnel of space-time connected to the galaxy in a duality way that have all times and all spaces concentrated all together in the center of the spiral galaxy. The Bulb is like approx. the opposite of the black hole and it is infinity concentrated of light inside its center and it doesn't have mass at All, because Light is massless.
 
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Dec 16, 2020
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Carbon dioxide is a colorless gas with a density about 53% higher than that of dry air. Carbon dioxide molecules consist of a carbon atom covalently double bonded to two oxygen atoms. It occurs naturally in Earth's atmosphere as a trace gas.
 

COLGeek

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Apr 3, 2020
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Carbon dioxide is a colorless gas with a density about 53% higher than that of dry air. Carbon dioxide molecules consist of a carbon atom covalently double bonded to two oxygen atoms. It occurs naturally in Earth's atmosphere as a trace gas.
Source:

 
Nov 2, 2020
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Here is new a theory about black holes.
what if black holes are tears in the universe due to the high mass of the star.
tears that causes the pull that traps even light into it?
In these forums I have seen this more than twice. Well we cannot rule out anything, Black Holes are objects known by us only in part, for instance the top of an iceberg... What we see about Black Holes, that we can talk about. Anyways (I want to point this out: this is only my pure opinion) I think that Black Holes are indipent objects that act as sharks that want to swallow anything. I nearly forgot, if you want to explain better your thought, I would be pleasured to read it.
 

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