General Relativity and Quantum Mechanics

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Feb 3, 2020
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What if the universe isn't really expanding.
Just filling in nada with quantum fluctuation as is goes so the conservation of energy looks static.
Areas with little mass will look like they expand faster and areas with more mass expand slower.
That is what we tend to see in the universe on large scales and regional scales and allows galaxies to collide/merge.

Expansion might not be space expanding but nada being consumed.
JMO
[/Q

Any thoughts about the interpretation of redshift observations in this scenario?
 
I think red shift would look about the same.
More nada filled in further you look back so red shifts of distant things should look like they do.

Things caught in a gravity well like Earth/moon will have no expansion or so small an amount it's undetectable.
Earth moon lack of expansion is a killer for traditional space expansion.
Same for galaxies merging is a killer for traditional expansion.
 

Catastrophe

The devil is in the detail
VPE, I see what you mean, but gravity is supposed to overcome expansion in local places. However, this seems to suggest that mass is occupying a smaller volume of space as space expands - perhaps due to mass? Is mass contracting space locally?

Cat :)
 
VPE, I see what you mean, but gravity is supposed to overcome expansion in local places. However, this seems to suggest that mass is occupying a smaller volume of space as space expands - perhaps due to mass? Is mass contracting space locally?

Cat :)
For sure we have some pretty odd expansion in our universe.
When you look way back it looks like C is defeated and space has expanded very much.
Locally expansion is more like contraction.
Could be some property of mass/area that has no nada to expand and gravity has the upper hand.

My guess is galactic black holes halt expansion locally well beyond the edge of a galaxy so that local expansion and distant expansion are very different.
That mechanism would give us a way for 2 galaxies to merge.
With just space expansion having 2 galaxies merge seems impossible.
 
Apr 13, 2021
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To understand we need to look at the physics of quantum matter.
I good look for you, but the journey of discovery is omnipotent.
Do not stop researching.
arXiv.com Collin University
Look at
Chiral Supersymmetry
Condensates
Transients
Neutron Matter
Quark matter
Partonic matter
Axion Glue on matter
People will spend years trying to understand the simplicity of Chaos.
 
Apr 13, 2021
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The process within a condensate is understood by Chiral SUPERSYMMETRY that creates the dipolar electromagnetic magnetic vector fields that expels matter from the core.
The core also pulls in matter. If the condensate has enough mass probably Quark matter or Partonic matter the vector fields pulling in may prevent ER from escaping thus a mimic Black hole without a singularity.
The vortices formed may come into view light years away from the core, because the The Event Horizon prevents us from seeing the core.
So we have a true cyclic event.
So the core does it all. Expels and contracts matter.
M87 is quite large 8 billion so solar mass
Core of Super Cluster of Galaxies can be much over 100 billion solar masses. Along the vortices we observe millions of stars that are seeded.
 
Apr 13, 2021
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[Submitted on 31 Jul 2021]
Inflation and Supersymmetry Breaking in Higgs-R2 Supergravity
Shuntaro Aoki, Hyun Min Lee, Adriana G. Menkara
We propose a new construction of the supergravity inflation as an UV completion of the Higgs-R2 inflation. In the dual description of R2-supergravity, we show that there appear dual chiral superfields containing the scalaron or sigma field in the Starobinsky inflation, which unitarizes the supersymmetric Higgs inflation with a large non-minimal coupling up to the Planck scale. We find that a successful slow-roll inflation is achievable in the Higgs-sigma field space, but under the condition that higher curvature terms are introduced to cure the tachyonic mass problems for spectator singlet scalar fields. We also discuss supersymmetry breaking and its transmission to the visible sector as a result of the couplings of the dual chiral superfields and the non-minimal gravity coupling of the Higgs fields.
 
[Submitted on 31 Jul 2021]
Inflation and Supersymmetry Breaking in Higgs-R2 Supergravity
Shuntaro Aoki, Hyun Min Lee, Adriana G. Menkara
I think the answer is in conservation of energy.
Expansion of space with no real mechanism for it will break conservation laws.
Quantum fluctuation being the result of expansion of nada and the quantum fluctuation e balance the mechanism of conservation gives us a natural reason for both.

Just a different way to think of expansion but does give some interesting results with very simple reasons that stay within universal laws.
JMO
 
Aug 14, 2020
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Relatively speaking, e=mc^2 (m=e/c^2). Where 'c'=300,000kps.

Gravity has always been -- and is always to be -- emergent (short of a fixed / constant background infinity). And, therefore, is elastically expansive (potentially to infinity.... short of a fixed / constant background infinity). And elastically expanding (potentially to infinity... short of a fixed / constant background infinity).

Universes (parallel universes (u)) expand to infinity.... all the way to merger into the fixed / constant background infinity (aka open systemic "boundarylessness" and [losses of] / [gains in] relativity).

When the Universe (U) is nothing but energy, it is nothing but mass, a [binary] / [duality of] dimensionality. Closed systemically, the infinite Cosmopolis in light: Closed systemically, infinitely massive and dark at the speed of light.

The diameter of the closed systemic circle: '0'-----|-----'c' ('c'-----|-----'0').
'c'='0'.

Relatively speaking, m=e/c^2 (e=mc^2). Where 'c'=300,000kps.
 

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