Help in finding a recently discovered planet that begins with the letter "A"

Status
Not open for further replies.
J

Jeepster99

Guest
<p><font size="2" color="#000080">Hi, Approximately a year ago my son and I, came across a story with regards to a newly discovered planet.&nbsp; This planet's name began with an "A" and was said to be HUGE and gaseous.&nbsp; If memory serves me correctly, it was pictured as reddish yellow.&nbsp; It was said to be, (again if memory serves), 5xs' larger than Jupiter.&nbsp; My son seemed to think that it was related to the Betelgeuse Constellation so we researched that topic extensively and came up empty.&nbsp; Maybe the connection was possibly the fact that both were discovered at about the same time?&nbsp; </font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000080">If anybody has any information about this mysterious "A" planet that we cannot find at all, I would be so grateful as he is very insistent that we add this planet to his science project.&nbsp; The pc we had at the time we originally read the story and saved pictures of this mysterious planet has since died, otherwise I would not be in this predicament.</font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000080">I will thank any or all who have any information with regards to this, as I am dumbfounded as to why we cannot find any information about this planet anymore. </font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000080">Thank you </font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000080">Donna aka Jeepster99</font></p><p>&nbsp;</p>
 
D

derekmcd

Guest
<p>Hi Jeepser99, welcome to SDC.</p><p>Exosolar planet are named after the star that they orbit followed by 'b', or 'c' depending on the sequential order they were discovered.&nbsp; The host star will be denoted with an 'a'.</p><p>For example, the star, Gliese 867, has (i believe) 3 known planets... Gliese 867b, Gliese 867c, and Gliese 867d.</p><p>Wikipedia seems to have a good list of both confirmed and candidate exosolar planets.&nbsp; Here's the link:</p><p>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_stars_with_confirmed_extrasolar_planets</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div> </div><br /><div><span style="color:#0000ff" class="Apple-style-span">"If something's hard to do, then it's not worth doing." - Homer Simpson</span></div> </div>
 
S

starsinmyeyes44

Guest
<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Hi, Approximately a year ago my son and I, came across a story with regards to a newly discovered planet.&nbsp; This planet's name began with an "A" and was said to be HUGE and gaseous.&nbsp; If memory serves me correctly, it was pictured as reddish yellow.&nbsp; It was said to be, (again if memory serves), 5xs' larger than Jupiter.&nbsp; My son seemed to think that it was related to the Betelgeuse Constellation so we researched that topic extensively and came up empty.&nbsp; Maybe the connection was possibly the fact that both were discovered at about the same time?&nbsp; If anybody has any information about this mysterious "A" planet that we cannot find at all, I would be so grateful as he is very insistent that we add this planet to his science project.&nbsp; The pc we had at the time we originally read the story and saved pictures of this mysterious planet has since died, otherwise I would not be in this predicament.I will thank any or all who have any information with regards to this, as I am dumbfounded as to why we cannot find any information about this planet anymore. Thank you Donna aka Jeepster99&nbsp; <br />Posted by Jeepster99</DIV></p><p><font size="2" color="#0000ff">There are people on the forum that are&nbsp;definitely more qualified than I to answer your question, but I found this list....which&nbsp;is very up-to-date.</font></p><p><font size="2" color="#0000ff">&nbsp;http://exoplanet.eu/catalog-all.php</font></p><p><font size="2" color="#0000ff">I had no idea that so many extrasolar planets had been discovered!&nbsp; So, thank you for your post...I learned some interesting information.</font></p><p><font size="2" color="#0000ff">Good luck with the science project.</font>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff00ff">In the book of life, the answers aren't in the back.<br /></font><strong>Charlie Brown</strong></p> </div>
 
D

derekmcd

Guest
<p>I'm also not aware of any planets being associated with Betelguese, they would have been enveloped a long time ago.&nbsp; </p><p>As describing your planet as a large gasious planet... almost all of them are.&nbsp; They are called 'Hot Jupiters'. </p><p>I couldn't find anything notable that started with an 'A' that you might be referring to.&nbsp; Hopefully the lists provided will help ya out.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div> </div><br /><div><span style="color:#0000ff" class="Apple-style-span">"If something's hard to do, then it's not worth doing." - Homer Simpson</span></div> </div>
 
J

Jeepster99

Guest
<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Hi Jeepser99, welcome to SDC.Exosolar planet are named after the star that they orbit followed by 'b', or 'c' depending on the sequential order they were discovered.&nbsp; The host star will be denoted with an 'a'.For example, the star, Gliese 867, has (i believe) 3 known planets... Gliese 867b, Gliese 867c, and Gliese 867d.Wikipedia seems to have a good list of both confirmed and candidate exosolar planets.&nbsp; Here's the link:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_stars_with_confirmed_extrasolar_planets <br />Posted by derekmcd</DIV><br /><br /><font size="2" color="#000080">Thank you so much for your help.&nbsp; We will check your link.&nbsp; </font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000080">Again thank you</font></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><font size="2" color="#000080">Donna & Tristan</font></p>
 
D

doubletruncation

Guest
<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Hi, Approximately a year ago my son and I, came across a story with regards to a newly discovered planet.&nbsp; This planet's name began with an "A" and was said to be HUGE and gaseous.&nbsp; If memory serves me correctly, it was pictured as reddish yellow.&nbsp; It was said to be, (again if memory serves), 5xs' larger than Jupiter.&nbsp; My son seemed to think that it was related to the Betelgeuse Constellation so we researched that topic extensively and came up empty.&nbsp; Maybe the connection was possibly the fact that both were discovered at about the same time?&nbsp; If anybody has any information about this mysterious "A" planet that we cannot find at all, I would be so grateful as he is very insistent that we add this planet to his science project.&nbsp; The pc we had at the time we originally read the story and saved pictures of this mysterious planet has since died, otherwise I would not be in this predicament.I will thank any or all who have any information with regards to this, as I am dumbfounded as to why we cannot find any information about this planet anymore. Thank you Donna aka Jeepster99&nbsp; <br /> Posted by Jeepster99</DIV></p><p>You may be thinking of AB Pictoris&nbsp; http://www.eso.org/public/outreach/press-rel/pr-2005/pr-12-05.html which is a gas giant several times the mass of jupiter that was detected by direct imaging. The mass for this planet is rather uncertain since it hasn't been directly measured, the only thing that is directly measured for this planet is its flux through several filters and its spectral type. Using these observables it's more or less straightforward to determine the planet's luminosity (assuming a distance which you can estimate based on the observed brightness of the star) and temperature. The mass is inferred from untested models that predict the luminosity/temperature of a planet as a function of its mass and age (again estimated from the star). </p><p>The extra-solar planets that we know the most about are the transiting planets (you can find a list of them in the catalog which starsinmyeyes mentioned: http://exoplanet.eu/catalog-transit.php ). We can directly measure the masses and radii of these planets, it is also possible to infer chemical compositions for these planets and even make rough surface maps of the planets (see http://www.spitzer.caltech.edu/Media/releases/ssc2007-09/ssc2007-09a.shtml ). In particular, the planets HD 189733 b, HD 209458 b, TRES-1 b are very well studied. A few other really interesting transiting planets include GJ 436 b (the only transiting hot Neptune known so far), HD 149026 b (a hot saturn-mass planet that has a radius that is quite a bit smaller than saturn which implies that the planet may have a rocky core that could be as much as 70 times the mass of the Earth - that's 70 earths worth of rock in the center of the planet!), XO-3 b (a 13 jupiter mass planet), HAT P-2 b (an 8 jupiter mass planet with a really eccentric orbit), and HD 17156 b (the known transiting planet with the longest period - 21 days, it has a mass that is about 3 times that of jupiter and is also quite eccentric). </p><p>Other really interesting extrasolar planet systems that aren't transiting (so we can't say quite as much about them) include the GJ 581 system (three small planets orbiting an M dwarf including 5 and 8 earth mass planets), 55 Cancri which has 5 planets (it is a wide binary star system, the known planets all orbit one of the stars, that star has 4 ~jupiter sized planets 3 which orbit closer to the star than the earth orbits the sun, and it also has 1 planet, the innermost one, that's a little smaller than Neptune), and upsilon andromedae... just to name a few. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY