Identity-Switching Neutrinos Could Reveal Why We Exist At All. But Can We Find Them?

rod

Oct 22, 2019
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Scientists are searching for a ghostly neutrino particle that acts as its own antiparticle. If they find it, the discovery could resolve a cosmic conundrum: Why does matter exist at all?

Identity-Switching Neutrinos Could Reveal Why We Exist At All. But Can We Find Them? : Read more
"If matter and antimatter fully obey this symmetry, then as the cosmos evolved, all the matter and antimatter would have annihilated into photons and there would be no matter left for stars, planets or even human cells. We would not exist!" O'Donnell said. "The big question then is: 'Did this accounting scheme break sometime during the evolution of the universe?'"

My note, good to see this report at space.com. Explaining the problem of matter vs. antimatter in our universe is a vexing issue. The report indicates some events to observe may take place once in 1E+25 years or so :) Here is an older report on neutrinos in the Big Bang model, primordial neutrinos not observed in the universe from the Big Bang. Daya Bay: Discovery of New Kind of Neutrino Transformation, "The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment, a multinational collaboration operating in the south of China, has just reported the first results of its search for the last, most elusive piece of a long-standing puzzle: how is it that neutrinos can appear to vanish as they travel? The surprising answer opens a gateway to a new understanding of fundamental physics and may eventually solve the riddle of why there is far more ordinary matter than antimatter in the universe today." This report is from March 2012. If the problem is not solved, our universe we see in astronomy today - should not exist using the Big Bang :)
 

rod

Oct 22, 2019
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FYI, the problem of matter vs. antimatter and the origin of our universe has been reported on for a number of years. I found this interesting report from 1999 in Sky & Telescope magazine.

"One of cosmology's greatest mysteries is why we're here at all. One reason is that scientists have yet to explain how matter particles came to outnumber antimatter ones in the ultrahot inferno of the early Big Bang. Had they been present in equal numbers, as the simplest theories predict, matter and antimatter particles would have annihilated one another completely, leaving a sea of pure radiation."

Ref - Antimatter Finding Has Cosmological Implications, Sky & Telescope 98(4):27, 1999 (October issue). According to a number of reports on the problem, we should not see the universe today according to the Big Bang model :)
 
Jan 20, 2020
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Either way, its all from the formation of a subatomic particles and their counter part one of which is less stable. Throw in an infinite amount of time and you eventually get a big bang.
 

rod

Oct 22, 2019
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The problem with the matter vs. anti-matter issue is this all took place after the Big Bang event, during the nuclear fusion phase or commonly known as BBN. You do not have an infinite amount of time to solve the problem, very short amount of time :)
 

rod

Oct 22, 2019
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FYI, a source I know sent this note to me about the matter vs. anti-matter problem in the Big Bang model.

"Baryons are the normal matter particles, mostly protons and neutrons, which comprise most of the known matter in the universe. But the anti-particles (anti-protons and anti-electrons) must have also formed, with the condensation of those normal matter particles. However they are not observed. The lack of observations of the anti-particles in the known visible universe is another serious problem for the big bang. The anti-matter should be present in equal amounts to the normal matter in the universe. But it is not. This is sometimes called the matter/anti-matter asymmetry, or the baryon asymmetry problem. It has become a tuning parameter in the big bang model. That means the theorists do not have a theoretical model that can predict what the asymmetry is, or should be, nor how it allegedly came about."

I feel that the cosmology department needs to make a full disclosure here.
 
Jan 20, 2020
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The problem with the matter vs. anti-matter issue is this all took place after the Big Bang event, during the nuclear fusion phase or commonly known as BBN. You do not have an infinite amount of time to solve the problem, very short amount of time :)
But you do have an infinate amount of time before the big bang. In my view that was required. If you subscribe to the everything from nothing view of the big bang than that's another story.
 

rod

Oct 22, 2019
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FYI, Rod is looking at the primordial soup of matter vs. anti-matter that emerged after the Big Bang event. That is a timeline from the Planck time to about 3 minutes after the Big Bang involving BBN. This is a huge problem in the Big Bang model to explain the universe we see today and apparently, not commonly reported and understood very well. A new report is out today on the origin of dark matter, Oddball sexaquark particles could be immortal, if they exist at all

"After decades of poking around in the math behind the glue holding the innards of all matter together, physicists have found a strange hypothetical particle, one that has never appeared in any experiment. Called a sexaquark, the oddball is made up of a funky arrangement of six quarks of various flavors. Besides being a cool-sounding character, the sexaquark could eventually explain the ever-maddening mystery of dark matter. And physicists have found that if the sexaquark has a particular mass, the particle could live forever."

My observation, Interesting report and a new particle said that may explain dark matter. Looks like the Standard Model has many interesting particles now. The 3:16 minute video is interesting too. Paul Sutter says how the universe began in the video, "We really do not know" 😊 The matter vs. anti-matter issue (baryon asymmetry problem) among other Big Bang problems, is not yet solved.
 

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