If We Find Life on Europa or Enceladus, It Will Probably Be a '2nd Genesis'

rod

Oct 22, 2019
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If there are creatures swimming in the buried oceans of the outer solar system, they're probably not related to us, new research suggests.

If We Find Life on Europa or Enceladus, It Will Probably Be a '2nd Genesis' : Read more
"These results might seem to bode well for life's spread; after all, it might take just one impact of a microbe-bearing rock to turn Europa or Enceladus from habitable to inhabited. But there are more factors to consider, and they tamp down the optimism."

There is a critical assumption that is the foundation of all searches for life on other worlds. The well attested law of abiogenesis, this law of science is as well attested as Kepler's planetary laws, Newton's laws of motion, or the law of gravity - thus the law of abiogenesis is operating throughout the universe and in our solar system billions of years ago. I was glad to read some caution in the report. I watched a recent SCI program (How The Universe Works) where molten creatures swim around in a hot, molten sea on some remote, hot jupiter type exoplanet - as a possibility for alien life too.
 
Dec 17, 2019
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If there are reasons to exclude a first genesis happening on a habitable Moon and then migrating to Mars and/or the Earth, these are glaringly absent from the article. This possibility would obviate the need for a second genesis to explain life on a moon of Saturn or Jupiter. It seems a reasonable assumption that the travel time to the inner planets would be far shorter then the trip outward.......
 
Dec 17, 2019
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The intense radiation from Jupiter, within Jupiter’s Magnetosphere, where the 5 larges moons orbit, would eliminate the presence, let alone the genesis, of life there.

I have not done the math, but since the DeltaV is the same either direction, the energy required could be the same either way.
I suspect it is way easier and faster to fall in toward the sun's gravity well than to move outward.
 
Dec 17, 2019
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The intense radiation from Jupiter, within Jupiter’s Magnetosphere, where the 5 larges moons orbit, would eliminate the presence, let alone the genesis, of life there.

I have not done the math, but since the DeltaV is the same either direction, the energy required could be the same either way.
Not necessarily true. 100 miles of water and ice would provide protection from radiation. If "eliminate the presence of..........life there", then why would we be talking about it, whether by genesis or panspermia?
 
Dec 18, 2019
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"These results might seem to bode well for life's spread; after all, it might take just one impact of a microbe-bearing rock to turn Europa or Enceladus from habitable to inhabited. But there are more factors to consider, and they tamp down the optimism."

There is a critical assumption that is the foundation of all searches for life on other worlds. The well attested law of abiogenesis, this law of science is as well attested as Kepler's planetary laws, Newton's laws of motion, or the law of gravity - thus the law of abiogenesis is operating throughout the universe and in our solar system billions of years ago. I was glad to read some caution in the report. I watched a recent SCI program (How The Universe Works) where molten creatures swim around in a hot, molten sea on some remote, hot jupiter type exoplanet - as a possibility for alien life too.
As far as I can tell, there is no 'Law of Abiogenesis'. There once was a Law of Biogenesis, but that has been debunked.
 

rod

Oct 22, 2019
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1,080
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As far as I can tell, there is no 'Law of Abiogenesis'. There once was a Law of Biogenesis, but that has been debunked.
My note here. The law of abiogenesis is the critical assumption behind SETI and all searches for life outside of Earth. The law of biogenesis was affirmed by Louis Pasteur research and studies.
 

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