James Webb telescope finds ancient galaxy larger than our Milky Way, and it's threatening to upend cosmology

Feb 16, 2024
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Astronomers believe the first galaxies formed around giant halos of dark matter. But a newly discovered galaxy dating to roughly 13 billion years ago mysteriously appeared long before that process should have occurred.

James Webb telescope finds ancient galaxy larger than our Milky Way, and it's threatening to upend cosmology : Read more
Someone please apply V(r)=c*tanh(Hr/c) to be Hubble's Law, just to see what difference it makes? Also apply relativity to masses, time rates, etc. I really think it'll help. That galaxy may be super farther away than they think it is. And maybe the universe is older than they think, too.
 
Someone please apply V(r)=c*tanh(Hr/c) to be Hubble's Law, just to see what difference it makes? Also apply relativity to masses, time rates, etc. I really think it'll help. That galaxy may be super farther away than they think it is. And maybe the universe is older than they think, too.
Time, singularly, in each linear string is finite and the universes in all their turnovers are not older, or rather not much older if any older, than they think. The broad horizon, though, of all the offsetting time-strings (plural) is eternal.
 
Another nail in the coffin of the ridiculous concept of dark matter! Maybe the gravy train of dark matter research is finally coming to an end and some reasonable theory will be proposed.
 
Apr 24, 2023
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Astronomers believe the first galaxies formed around giant halos of dark matter. But a newly discovered galaxy dating to roughly 13 billion years ago mysteriously appeared long before that process should have occurred.

James Webb telescope finds ancient galaxy larger than our Milky Way, and it's threatening to upend cosmology : Read more
What puzzles me is if there are more than one galaxy and the universe is infinite then why aren't some galaxies that are not part of our big bang moving toward us as they expand in their part of the universe. How can everything we see be moving away from us when we are not the center of the galaxy/universe?
 
Space.com reported, "The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) has found a galaxy in the early universe that's so massive, it shouldn't exist, posing a "significant challenge" to the standard model of cosmology, according to the study authors. The galaxy, called ZF-UDS-7329, contains more stars than the Milky Way, despite having formed only 800 million years into the universe's 13.8 billion-year life span. This means they were somehow born without dark matter seeding their formation, contrary to what the standard model of galaxy formation suggests."

FYI, this is not the first report on JWST and early galaxies with large redshifts not playing well with cosmology, LCDM model of the Big Bang.

James Webb's 'too massive' galaxies may be even more massive, https://phys.org/news/2023-05-james-webb-massive-galaxies.html

"The first results from the James Webb Space Telescope have hinted at galaxies so early and so massive that they are in tension with our understanding of the formation of structure in the universe. Various explanations have been proposed that may alleviate this tension. But now a new study from the Cosmic Dawn Center suggests an effect which has never before been studied at such early epochs, indicating that the galaxies may be even more massive."
 
This is one heck of an "in your face" observation. We should not see this.

That is a very large and old spec of dust to form so early. With present consensus.

The only conclusion is that the cosmos is much older than thought. And probably a lot larger.

Or a consensus change.
 

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