Mars Landing Plan

Thomas Likes Space

This is Thomas
Mar 14, 2021
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Hey, it's me! Sorry for being offline for a while. My question is about the Mars landing, as i asked earlier in my forums.space.com career: Does anyone think we well reach mars by 2024 and live? Most of you guys agreed, since that was a viral post with 1K visits (Thank you guys so much!), i thought it'll be funny to go and ask what the plan is of the landing.


Question 1: When will we start the launch?
Question 2: How are we building that Mars Base/Building with the air we breathe in and out?
Question 3: Can we use WiFi/Internet? So if i go to mars i would be able to post here ;-).
And basically what's the plan with everything in one?

- Thomas ;-)
 
Dec 9, 2020
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What the plan for 2024 on Mars? Mr. Musk has made the boast/promise/objective; shouldn't he publish the details? I for one am especially interested in when and where Mr. Musk's associates will call for Mars volunteer colonists. I have a list of those I would like to volunteer.
 
2024 landing on Mars would certainly be an ambitious accomplishment. I didnt see the previous post, but if this 2024 timeline is based off of Elon's annoucement in 2017, he updated that prediction to 2026.

As a side note: NASA is under presidential orders to land humans on Mars by 2033.
 
Apr 19, 2021
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I think we've already come a long way just successfully landing on Mars, let alone having rovers explore the planet.

However, we need more time to develop the technology to enable persons to survive in the extremely cold, dusty and hostile Martian environment. I would also be in favor of the mission allowing people to return to Earth.

Finally, I'm very excited about today's successful helicopter flight and wonder if a hovercraft might be ideal to cover terrain quickly and transport loads on the planet's surface.

Keep up the great work NASA!
 
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May 14, 2021
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2024 or even 2026 might be a bit soon. IMHO, whatever the crew ride to Mars should be thoroughly test in LEO or even in lunar orbit with a crew and no physical support for at least two years as that’s how long the real trip will be. I don’t think we’ve ever had a crewed flight for that long where something didn’t break, and two years is a lot of life support. Also, maybe, an orbital station there first without landing for duration testing. They could drive the rovers and fly the helicopter in real time, then.
 
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May 14, 2021
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@Helio: Given that it took Perseverance about seven months travel time, they may be able to shorten the trip a bit if they can add some fuel, let’s say six months, plus return, that’s a year. Ideal return transfer orbit will certainly not be at a convenient time, they’ll have to wait for a window. Such a long trip, they won’t spend just a day or two, they likely spend a month or two boots on the ground, depending on the return window. Then there’s weather for landing and ascension. That will likely make it 15 months or so. In the past I’ve read many times the estimate of two years. If you want to test the trip nearby, I would certainly test for a bit longer than the flight plan to see what breaks and other factors would be on such a trip. It’s rare for manned space travel to go without a hitch from launch to recovery. In the US Navy, sea trials and refresher training always go for evolutions much more than typical or even extreme so see if everything and everybody holds up, then the norm seems easy.
 
Feb 11, 2021
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Well, let me do my bit for this thread. SpaceX plans to launch a mission in 2024, but looking at their success, I start to think that we can launch it a year earlier. It's rather early to speak about building a Mars base because Percy tried to make breathable oxygen on Mars, but its amount won't be enough for a comfortable stay. Internet on Mars is possible, but space agencies need to launch an orbiter or satellite. NASA had such a project a long ago, but it was canceled. It's possible to connect to Earth's internet, but the speed will be too slow.
 
May 25, 2021
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I think we've already come a long way just successfully landing on Mars, let alone having rovers explore the planet.

However, we need more time to develop the technology to enable persons to survive in the extremely cold, dusty and hostile Martian environment. I would also be in favor of the mission allowing people to return to Earth.

Finally, I'm very excited about today's successful helicopter flight and wonder if a hovercraft might be ideal to cover terrain quickly and transport loads on the planet's surface.

Keep up the great work NASA!
This is why it was said that the ones accepted would be a lot older, but still in good shape. And they would know it might be a one way ticket.
 
Jun 15, 2021
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I think for us to be able to land on Mars at least 10 years before the start of the flight. Since it seems to me that we need more research, more resources and preparation. You also need to fly there, have the resources and in order to get back. So humanity still needs time.
 

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