MRO HiRISE images Phobos.

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3488

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<p><font size="2"><strong>Prepare for your jaw to hit the floor.</strong></font></p><p><strong><font size="2">You have your's truly here to thank to help make these observations happen (it was partly my idea in the HiRISE pointing suggestions).</font></strong></p><p><font size="2" color="#000080"><strong>http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/phobos.php</strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>Andrew Brown.</strong></font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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CalliArcale

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Prepare for your jaw to hit the floor.You have your's truly here to thank to help make these observations happen (it was partly my idea in the HiRISE pointing suggestions).http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/phobos.phpAndrew Brown. <br /> Posted by 3488</DIV></p><p>*picks jaw up off of floor*</p><p>&nbsp;Wow.&nbsp; That is stupendous!&nbsp; The MGS images were nice, but this is incredible!&nbsp; I realize that's false color, but the white stuff just outside the rim of Stickney is amazing.&nbsp; Wow.&nbsp; Abso-freakin-lutely gorgeous!&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#666699"><em>"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly . . . timey wimey . . . stuff."</em>  -- The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Prepare for your jaw to hit the floor.You have your's truly here to thank to help make these observations happen (it was partly my idea in the HiRISE pointing suggestions).http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/phobos.phpAndrew Brown. <br />Posted by 3488</DIV></p><p>C'mon Andrew, you have to post at least an appetizing image <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-tongue-out.gif" border="0" alt="Tongue out" title="Tongue out" /><br /><img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/10/2/2aad1aa4-e2a3-4861-923c-ae6be755b90c.Medium.jpg" alt="" /><br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
3

3488

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'><font color="#ff0000">C'mon Andrew, you have to post at least an appetizing image <br />Posted by MeteorWayne</font></DIV></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>You're correct Wayne, <br /><br /></strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>I must do better. Andrew, go stand in the corner, facing the wall with the Dunce cap on. !!!! <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/5/12/95bc2c8b-ce34-4c5e-ac5c-d3e028bcf46c.Medium.gif" alt="" />&nbsp;<img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/7/8/47791157-63c7-49f1-b853-ebe810d166e5.Medium.gif" alt="" /><br /><br /></strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Crop & enlargement of the deposit from Stickney Crater. Scene is approx 10 KM across. Individual boulders are visible.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000080"><strong>http://img407.imageshack.us/my.php?image=sdcphobosbrighterdeposidu5.jpg</strong></font></p><p><img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/13/11/9d1ba2b6-b033-4c46-abe0-2114178351fc.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Andrew Brown.</strong></font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p>No dunce cap requred. You're good at the crop and enlarge. There, I wear the dunce cap <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-smile.gif" border="0" alt="Smile" title="Smile" /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
3

3488

Guest
<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'><font color="#ff0000">No dunce cap requred. You're good at the crop and enlarge. There, I wear the dunce cap <br />Posted by MeteorWayne</font></DIV></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Hi Wayne, I relinked the above image in post above yours,&nbsp;so it is visible @ full size. Dunno though, sometimes I should wear the Dunce cap for my inane ramblings on here. </strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Monochromatic view of Phobos from MRO HiRISE.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000080"><strong>http://img178.imageshack.us/my.php?image=sdcpia10367phobosfromhijh0.jpg</strong></font><br /><img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/15/0/bf26a64a-b141-48f5-b023-93c088a03eb5.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Crop & enlargement of upper right terminator of Phobos from MRO HiRISE.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000080"><strong>http://img149.imageshack.us/my.php?image=phobosdetailofpia10367fcs6.jpg</strong></font><br /><img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/5/13/55e56eec-f92c-4f38-9db9-8615db67fe92.Medium.jpg" alt="" /><br /><br /><font size="2"><strong>Andrew Brown.</strong></font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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ThereIWas2

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<p>All those parallel grooves look like it was involved in a serious side-swipe with something, or passed through a big cloud of boulders, possibly related to what caused Stickney.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Isn't Phobos tidally locked like Luna?&nbsp; Which way does Stickney face relative to the prograde velocity vector?&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><span class="postbody"><span style="font-style:italic"><br /></span></span></p> </div>
 
3

3488

Guest
<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'><font color="#ff0000">All those parallel grooves look like it was involved in a serious side-swipe with something, or passed through a big cloud of boulders, possibly related to what caused Stickney.&nbsp;Isn't Phobos tidally locked like Luna?&nbsp; Which way does Stickney face relative to the prograde velocity vector?&nbsp; <br />Posted by ThereIWas2</font></DIV></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Hi ThereIWas.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong><font color="#000000">Yes Phobos is tidally locked like Luna. Stickney is on the&nbsp;trailing,&nbsp;Mars facing side.</font>&nbsp;The grooves were thought to be related to the Stickney Crater impact, but the ESA Mars Express, these from MRO&nbsp;& re-evaluation of the Viking 1 orbiter images, do show that Stickney is not at the bulls eye (the grooves are not radial), thus casting doubts on that idea. The main belt asteroid 951 Gaspra also has grooves, perhaps some thing similar happened there?</strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>The grooves may be due to either the tidal effects from Mars or may be related to the time that Phobos may have been in the Asteroid Belt, or during capture by Mars.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Another one of my crops & enlargements. The image has been rotated 90 degrees clockwise from the original. Detail of limb.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000080"><strong>http://img403.imageshack.us/my.php?image=1detailofpia10367limbtenn1.jpg</strong></font><br /><img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/10/9/7a28143b-a715-4009-b9d5-f50c285f7a39.Medium.jpg" alt="" /><br />http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Forums/#</p><p><strong><font size="2">Yet another one of my crops & enlargements. The image has been rotated 90 degrees clockwise from the original. Detail of limb & terminator.</font></strong><br /><font size="2" color="#000080"><strong>http://img528.imageshack.us/my.php?image=2detailofpia10367limbteem6.jpg</strong></font><br /><img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/3/0/c394597c-bdaa-4a2a-a0cc-6e6784b4e3fe.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Andrew Brown.</strong></font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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silylene old

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Prepare for your jaw to hit the floor.You ...Posted by 3488</DIV></p><p>My jaw is still nailed to the floor.&nbsp; WOW !!!</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>thanks for posting.<br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature" align="center"><em><font color="#0000ff">- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -</font></em> </div><div class="Discussion_UserSignature" align="center"><font color="#0000ff"><em>I really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function.</em></font> </div> </div>
 
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fractionofadot

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<p>Incredible images, thank you!</p><p>One thing:</p><p>http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/images/2008/details/phobos/PSP_007769_9010_IRB.jpg </p><p>In that image, if you look at the very top centre crater, and move down to the next big one - in it you can make out a strangish raised feature.</p><p>It appears more reflective than the surroundings and casts a long shadow</p><p>I'm guessing it has a lot to do with the angle, etc of the image. Any ideas?</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
3

3488

Guest
<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'><font color="#ff0000">Incredible images, thank you!One thing:http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/images/2008/details/phobos/PSP_007769_9010_IRB.jpg In that image, if you look at the very top centre crater, and move down to the next big one - in it you can make out a strangish raised feature.It appears more reflective than the surroundings and casts a long shadowI'm guessing it has a lot to do with the angle, etc of the image. Any ideas? <br />Posted by fractionofadot</font></DIV></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Hi fractionofadot,</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Yes, that looks like an outcrop or boulder. I have done the below concerning said feature.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>A quick Powerpoint JPEG composite below.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Showing a five KM wide crater with a boulder or outcrop, imaged ten minutes apart. Note how the shadow&nbsp;retreated (right image first)&nbsp;in such a short time, due to Phobos's rapid orbit around Mars of 7 Hours & 39 minutes.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000080"><strong>http://img141.imageshack.us/my.php?image=phobos5kmcraterwithbouliz5.jpg</strong></font><br /><img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/6/11/76f5fc63-928e-4190-bb68-d3192b90d9bd.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></p><p><font size="2" color="#ff0000"><strong>Edited: To alter text to explain that the right hand image on the montage was the first one, taken 10 minutes before the left one.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Andrew Brown.</strong></font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

Guest
<p>The first full false color image is my new desktop!!</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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silylene old

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>The first full false color image is my new desktop!! <br />Posted by MeteorWayne</DIV></p><p>Geesh, it was my new desktop also !</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature" align="center"><em><font color="#0000ff">- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -</font></em> </div><div class="Discussion_UserSignature" align="center"><font color="#0000ff"><em>I really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function.</em></font> </div> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Geesh, it was my new desktop also ! <br />Posted by silylene</DIV><br /><br />Some images are just too good to pass up.</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
3

3488

Guest
<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'><font color="#ff0000">Geesh, it was my new desktop also ! <br />Posted by silylene</font></DIV></p><p><strong><font size="2" color="#000000">It's mine too now.</font></strong> <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/0/7/20e181e7-9b0b-4f60-b7c5-a86ffb374d37.Medium.gif" alt="" /><br /><br /><br /><br />Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'><font color="#ff0000">Some images are just too good to pass up.Posted by MeteorWayne</font></DIV></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Too true Wayne, just stunning, absolutely stunning. I hope they will do likewise with Deimos (Deimos was also part of the request). I know Deimos is smaller & somewhat further away, but HiRISE will still reveal much new compositional data as well as some great images.</strong></font></p><p><strong><font size="2">I noticed that I had made a mistake with my earlier image, the second image was the FIRST one taken. The shadow was retreating, not advancing. My bad. <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/13/1/2d038e28-00ac-479a-a182-7a6c1119edeb.Medium.gif" alt="" />&nbsp;<img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/10/4/6ac60e6b-25c1-4ebc-b4bc-51580992c639.Medium.gif" alt="" />&nbsp;<img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/5/9/951b5f8f-f534-4a97-8984-6c6d3575a654.Medium.gif" alt="" /><br /></font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">Below. The same 5KM crater enlarged, showing several other boulders & outcrops.</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">http://www.photodump.com/Anonymous/Phobos%205%20KM%20crater%20with%20boulder%20(2)%20HiRISE%20MRO.html<br /><br /><img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/9/6/197c0c65-781e-43d7-9679-46e352a988b3.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">Andrew Brown.<br /></font></strong></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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JonClarke

Guest
<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>The first full false color image is my new desktop!! <br />Posted by MeteorWayne</DIV></p><p>And mine!<br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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j05h

Guest
<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Prepare for your jaw to hit the floor.You have your's truly here to thank to help make these observations happen (it was partly my idea in the HiRISE pointing suggestions).http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/phobos.phpAndrew Brown. <br /> Posted by 3488</DIV><br /></p><p>Andrew - those are the best images I've ever seen of Phobos, congrats. Beautiful. </p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div align="center"><em>We need a first generation of pioneers.</em><br /></div> </div>
 
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exoscientist

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>You're correct Wayne, I must do better. Andrew, go stand in the corner, facing the wall with the Dunce cap on. !!!! &nbsp;Crop & enlargement of the deposit from Stickney Crater. Scene is approx 10 KM across. Individual boulders are visible.http://img407.imageshack.us/my.php?image=sdcphobosbrighterdeposidu5.jpgAndrew Brown. <br /> Posted by 3488</DIV></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;Great image, Andrew. In part of the Stickney image, it looks like something must have flowed. The connection with the whitish material may be suggestive.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;&nbsp; Bob<br />&nbsp; </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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3488

Guest
<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>&nbsp;<font color="#ff0000">&nbsp;Great image, Andrew. In part of the Stickney image, it looks like something must have flowed. The connection with the whitish material may be suggestive.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Bob&nbsp; <br />Posted by exoscientist</font></DIV></p><p>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'><font color="#ff0000">Andrew - those are the best images I've ever seen of Phobos, congrats. Beautiful. Posted by j05h</font></DIV></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Hi j05h & exoscientist.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Thank you so much for your comments. As for every one on this thread, the feed back I have received has made the whole excercise seem very worthwhile.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>I have made another couple of quick PowerPoint JPEGs.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Below another 5 KM crater with changing illumination.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000080"><strong>http://img138.imageshack.us/my.php?image=phobos5kmcratertaken10mck6.jpg</strong></font></p><p><img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/1/15/c145f6b9-41c8-4590-af85-cb4541cd1146.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></p><p><strong><font size="2">Below&nbsp;1 KM central portion of above 5 KM crater with changing illumination.</font></strong></p><p><font size="2" color="#000080"><strong>http://img171.imageshack.us/my.php?image=phoboshj5.jpg</strong></font><br /><img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/8/1/b8bd492a-701c-4400-914d-cbcd400e4f82.Medium.jpg" alt="" /><br /><br /><br /><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Andrew Brown.</strong></font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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JonClarke

Guest
<p>Phobos is supposed to be very dark.&nbsp; So I assume this has been lightened for us to see the details.&nbsp; What would it look like to us as we approached?</p><p>Jon</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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3488

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'><font color="#ff0000">Phobos is supposed to be very dark.&nbsp; So I assume this has been lightened for us to see the details.&nbsp; What would it look like to us as we approached?Jon <br />Posted by jonclarke</font></DIV></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Hi Jon.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2" color="#000000"><strong>Yes Phobos is dark, albedo is just under 9%. I guess the images have been brightened up a bit, tough HiRISE is very sensitive.</strong></font></p><p><strong><font size="2">I wonder if Phobos would look a very dark grey or black even?</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2" color="#000000">I am still working on the recent Phobos images & this one is my latest effort.</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">Below a crop & enlargement of the 3km crater inside Stickney Crater. I've rotated this image 90 degrees to the left. Whilst seen many times before on the Viking orbiter, Mars Global Surveyer MOC&nbsp;& Mars Express images, this image shows how deep it is very well indeed. My guess is that the Stickney Crater floor was soft & the impactor that caused this crater was able to drill in. We do not really see other such deep craters, in relation to their diameters&nbsp;elsewhere on Phobos.</font></strong></p><p><font color="#000000"><strong><font size="2" color="#000080">http://img245.imageshack.us/my.php?image=phobos3kmwidecraterwithwh2.jpg</font></strong><br /><strong><font size="2"><img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/14/7/7e93822b-5667-450b-87ad-8de3a73d4b21.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></font></strong><br /></font></p><p><strong><font size="2" color="#000000">Andrew Brown.</font></strong></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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efron_24

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<p>If correct... Phobos will one day be ripped apart as it comes closer to Mars.</p><p>any idea what will happen ? and how fast..</p><p>is this a matter of minutes.. or centuries</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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3488

Guest
<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'><font color="#ff0000">If correct... Phobos will one day be ripped apart as it comes closer to Mars.any idea what will happen ? and how fast..is this a matter of minutes.. or centuries <br />Posted by efron_24</font></DIV><br /><strong><font size="2">&nbsp;</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">General accepted timing is approx 55 million years before Phobos reaches the Roche Limit.</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">It depends on how co herent Phobos is. If a true planetesimal a solid peice like Asteroids 243 Ida or 433 Eros, then it could take quite some time & may even impact as a large lump.</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">If a Rubble Pile, like Jupiter's moon Amalthea, Saturn moon Hyperion, asteroids 253 Mathilde or 25143 Itokawa, then it would be pretty quick, perhaps over a matter of years,</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">Andrew Brown.</font></strong></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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thor06

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<p>Holy !@#@ Andrew those pictures are amazing!&nbsp; I'm fixated on the streaks/troughs.&nbsp; In this image they actually cross:</p><p>http://img528.imageshack.us/my.php?image=2detailofpia10367limbteem6.jpg</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>In this one (God it's gorgous) It looks like it entered an atmosphere "looks ablated":</p><p>http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/images/2008/details/phobos/PSP_007769_9010_IRB_StickneyU.jpg</p><p>That is not possible, right?</p><p>I love a mystery!&nbsp;</p><p>Andrew wrote:&nbsp;<font size="2"><strong> The grooves were thought to be related to the Stickney Crater impact, but the ESA Mars Express, these from MRO&nbsp;& re-evaluation of the Viking 1 orbiter images, do show that Stickney is not at the bulls eye (the grooves are not radial),</strong></font></p><p>Multiple impact features? Stickney covers older impacts?</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p> <font color="#0000ff">                           www.watchnasatv.com</font></p><p>                          ONE PERCENT FOR NASA! </p> </div>
 
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bearack

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Holy !@#@ Andrew those pictures are amazing!&nbsp; I'm fixated on the streaks/troughs.&nbsp; In this image they actually cross:http://img528.imageshack.us/my.php?image=2detailofpia10367limbteem6.jpgIn this one (God it's gorgous) It looks like it entered an atmosphere "looks ablated":http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/images/2008/details/phobos/PSP_007769_9010_IRB_StickneyU.jpgThat is not possible, right?I love a mystery!&nbsp;Andrew wrote:&nbsp; The grooves were thought to be related to the Stickney Crater impact, but the ESA Mars Express, these from MRO&nbsp;& re-evaluation of the Viking 1 orbiter images, do show that Stickney is not at the bulls eye (the grooves are not radial),Multiple impact features? Stickney covers older impacts? <br />Posted by thor06</DIV><br /><br />What about ice fractures under the surface from impacts?</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><br /><img id="06322a8d-f18d-4ab1-8ea7-150275a4cb53" src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/6/14/06322a8d-f18d-4ab1-8ea7-150275a4cb53.Large.jpg" alt="blog post photo" /></p> </div>
 
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