NASA exoplanet telescope discovers 'super-Earth' in its star's Goldilocks zone

Jan 28, 2024
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I am disappointed I have not received any significant comments on my theory for How the Universe Works. You seem to be the only one who routinely posts or reads articles on the Cosmology Form?? Is there a better place I can post the theory to get some meaningful responses? Thanks for your earlier response. I still haven't figured out how to post a jpg figure on the site. My illustration that shows the interrelationships between the various components such as Dark & Light Matter and Dark & Light Energy is helpful in understanding the key elements of the theory. It should also be noted that it assumes that Total Matter and Total Energy in the universe are constant over time and have always existed. That is why there is no" before" and no "after" in the cyclical process. It assumes that Nature has always existed .
 
TOI-715 b, some properties can be viewed at these sites.



Reference paper cited, Ref - A 1.55 R⊕ habitable-zone planet hosted by TOI-715, an M4 star near the ecliptic South Pole, https://academic.oup.com/mnras/article/527/1/35/7172075?login=false, 18-May-2023.

My note. 1.55 earth radii, if the mass is 3 earths, mean density about 4.43 g cm^-3. Mass is not published at this time. I plan to monitor reports on TOI-715 b and see if it is truly a habitable exoplanet. K2-18 b underwent plenty of recent revisions in the reports. Are we getting science or astrobiology hype?
 
Just fooling around herein. More or less tangentially, I assume it is possible for more or less hollow balls to exist in the universe with the major of gravity tied only to the material shell structure and being an Earth-like planet existing three times the total surface area of the Earth with the same outer surface gravity as the smaller more materially compacted Earth. A planet, rather than star, built around a pale-ghost of a black hole, of course ('black hole lite', very lite, even solidly antigravitational interiorly from center to event horizon, so to speak).
 
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Jan 28, 2024
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NASA's exoplanet-hunting spacecraft TESS has spotted a 'super-Earth' in the habitable zone of its red dwarf star, with indications it may have Earth-sized company.

NASA exoplanet telescope discovers 'super-Earth' in its star's Goldilocks zone : Read more
I find it hard to understand all of the fuss over a super-earth or exoplanets in general when there is much to learn about black holes, dark matter, dark energy, and how science works. I doubt they will shed new light on the pressing issues in astronomy. At least research on our planets is moving science forward and could shed some light on potential for life beyond earth. Understanding how galaxies, stars, solar systems and planets work moves science forward. Building better sensors to look further back in time has produced some revolutionary new ideas and insights. However, discovery of life or conditions suitable for life in other solar systems or galaxies is as worthwhile as the SETI project has proven to be. During my year a JPL I was amazed at the effort and money spent on this program which has little hope of getting any meaningful results even if they were to detect some coherent signals.
 
Feb 6, 2024
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Just fooling around herein. More or less tangentially, I assume it is possible for more or less hollow balls to exist in the universe with the major of gravity tied only to the material shell structure and being an Earth-like planet existing three times the total surface area of the Earth with the same outer surface gravity as the smaller more materially compacted Earth. A planet, rather than star, built around a pale-ghost of a black hole, of course ('black hole lite', very lite, even solidly antigravitational interiorly from center to even t horizon, so to speak).

I find it hard to understand all of the fuss over a super-earth or exoplanets in general when there is much to learn about black holes, dark matter, dark energy, and how science works. I doubt they will shed new light on the pressing issues in astronomy. At least research on our planets is moving science forward and could shed some light on potential for life beyond earth. Understanding how galaxies, stars, solar systems and planets work moves science forward. Building better sensors to look further back in time has produced some revolutionary new ideas and insights. However, discovery of life or conditions suitable for life in other solar systems or galaxies is as worthwhile as the SETI project has proven to be. During my year a JPL I was amazed at the effort and money spent on this program which has little hope of getting any meaningful results even if they were to detect some coherent signals.
I have to agree. These Super-Earths, no matter how interesting they may be, are useless to spend too much time into researching. It's unlikely that they have any effect on mankind currently. I believe we should rather spend more time discover the secrets of our universe.
 
Mar 31, 2020
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Another planet TIC 271971130.02 is another prospect for life and at 1.066 the mass it represents the smallest world found by TESS. It is very exciting to do the follow up with another candidate for the JWST.
 

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