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Origins and Big Bang

Oct 24, 2019
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I recently saw the blog about a star that is likely older than the Universe. I thought the article was about HD 140283 being older than the universe was going to put forth what I have always thought about the big bang.

That is why is it that the explosion point of a grouping of merged blackholes has to be the sum of all matter in the universe? It would seem more rational to assume that it is a high number, but that much matter (stars predominantly) may have escaped the grouping of black holes that created the big bang. Similarly there could be other black holes that did not merge before the big bang occurred and share these ancient ages.

I would very much like to hear other takes on this.

Thanks,
Jzaz17
 
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rod

Oct 22, 2019
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Jzaz17 CPA, yes the star is considered perhaps as old as 14 billion years or so. This is not the first time in astronomy where an object is found and the age appears to be older than the Hubble time (globular clusters in the past had this issue too along with some other stars). We are discussing origins and you use a group of black holes *that created the big bang*. My question, in your model of origins, where did the black holes come from?
 
Oct 24, 2019
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Rod, you're right, I didn't provide that. I am of the opinion that black holes grow in size and their attraction eventually involves merging. As the universe stops expanding (a long time from now) eventually they would start travelling in the same direction. As this happens they would continue to grow and merge increasing in size and power until they meet the 'bang threshold'.
 

rod

Oct 22, 2019
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Okay, I see an assumption you are making about the black holes. Basically it seems we are back to this problem in the origin of the universe. "There are only 3 options for the origin of this universe: 1) it has always existed 2) it suddenly appeared from nothing 3) it was created supernaturally - “It is then tempting to go one step further and speculate that the entire universe evolved from literally nothing.” - Guth & Stienhardt, May 1984, Scientific American

It appears you are assuming option 1) to explain the existence of the black holes that created the big bang. Thanks for the answer--Rod
 

rod

Oct 22, 2019
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We have some new information on the origin of the Big Bang event. "The postinflation reheating period sets up the conditions for the Big Bang, and in some sense puts the 'bang' in the Big Bang," says David Kaiser,..", see Physicists simulate critical 'reheating' period that kickstarted the Big Bang My thinking - where did the physics come from before the Big Bang? I think we will find the new cosmology teachers are falling back to option 1) cited above so we have the universe, always existing in some form, thus just a flavor of the steady-state cosmology. Great efforts are underway to show we never have an unknown, distinct beginning for the origin of the universe and there is no single, distinct beginning now in cosmology.
 

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