Question Perfect Gravity Lens?

Would the perfect gravity lens be a round/spherical bump of negative gravity with a ring/sphere/gutter of positive gravity immediately around it?
Light coming at it would be deflected around the negative gravity and channeled chasing partway through/round the gutter on all sides and flung out, converging at some focus distance from it.
The broader the configuration extended the greater the magnification would be.
That seems to make sense to me.
Flaws in my logic?
 
Aug 7, 2023
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Would the perfect gravity lens be a round/spherical bump of negative gravity with a ring/sphere/gutter of positive gravity immediately around it?
Light coming at it would be deflected around the negative gravity and channeled chasing partway through/round the gutter on all sides and flung out, converging at some focus distance from it.
The broader the configuration extended the greater the magnification would be.
That seems to make sense to me.
Flaws in my logic?
I think the light from individual stars (or other objects) would get "mixed-up" in the gutter and the output at the focus would just be a bunch of light. That would make a poor magnification device, but it may have other uses.
 
Well I was thinking of a smooth 'U' shaped trough or rather its 3D corollary.
I don't think crossing light waves interfere with each other.
The trick is both creating that smooth positive 'U' shaped gravity trough using matter & not having the matter impede the light too much.

But (getting a little excited) my non-perpendicular gravity axis theory sort of does that in a more fragmetary manner.
I thought a tilted gravity circumference around the outer stars of a galaxy, creating a positive gravity trough on the outside and a negative gravity mound on the inside,
both at a (matter-free) circumference was questionable.
I think though it might create a satisfactory if fragmentary exo-circumferential channeling/directing (lensing) mechanism.
One (outer) star would wrap/curve a light ray a little & that might hit a nearby (outer) star and curve it a bit more, etc. and that might be a good lensing effect.
And those troughs are smooth and matter-free distance from each (outer) star.
It's a wild idea, but maybe it does work.
 
Aug 7, 2023
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1
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While we are making our super lens, let’ save some of that negative gravity for a no-fuel-required spacecraft. We put a glob of negative gravity on the tail and some positive gravity on the nose, and we can travel throughout the universe with zero fuel consumption.
 

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