The planet Mars is full of life

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May 14, 2021
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These rocks are nothing more than rocks everywhere. Mercury’s got rocks, Venus has rocks, just as every planet, moon, asteroid, and comet. Likely, Jupiter and the others have rocks deep down. Rocks likely pervade the universe on bodies cool enough to be solid. There is no evidence that these are anything but rocks. Perhaps wind and weathering have moved some smaller ones, and when the sand shifts, the larger ones may appear to have moved. But, they are still just rocks. If new evidence is discovered, that could indicate some possibilities, but, the existing evidence indicates that they are what they look like . . . Rocks.
 
Sep 23, 2021
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These rocks are nothing more than rocks everywhere. Mercury’s got rocks, Venus has rocks, just as every planet, moon, asteroid, and comet. Likely, Jupiter and the others have rocks deep down. Rocks likely pervade the universe on bodies cool enough to be solid. There is no evidence that these are anything but rocks. Perhaps wind and weathering have moved some smaller ones, and when the sand shifts, the larger ones may appear to have moved. But, they are still just rocks. If new evidence is discovered, that could indicate some possibilities, but, the existing evidence indicates that they are what they look like . . . Rocks.
I agree that the universe is full of rocks, on Mars there are rocks too, of course.
But not everything on the Martian surface is rocks and sand.
How can we explain the presence of practically identical rocks in various places on Mars so far apart?
How can we explain the perfect symmetry that some of them exhibit?
How to explain that some of them show the same shape and characteristics on their surface from rocks barely one centimeter to rocks almost one meter high?
Why are there no large rocks (taller than the rover itself) on the flat surfaces of the planet?
Why do Martian rocks dissolve into small pebbles?
Why do some of these Martian rocks empty their interior into a kind of light colored paste that flows outwards leaving behind only an empty pod like the shell of an egg?
There are many unknowns, why is NASA not able to attribute an origin (volcanic or sedimentary) to these rocks?
Why is NASA having trouble getting a solid core in the drilling it makes on these rocks?
There is a precedent, here on our planet, of rocks that grow and show characteristics of a living being, look at the "Trovants" rocks from Romania.
Thanks for your comment.
 

COLGeek

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Apr 3, 2020
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As a reminder, don't believe everything you see on Youtube (or the Internet, in general). Given the exploration of Mars, in the past and present, I would think that if any signs of life had been detected, we would all know about it.
 
Sep 23, 2021
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As a reminder, don't believe everything you see on Youtube (or the Internet, in general). Given the exploration of Mars, in the past and present, I would think that if any signs of life had been detected, we would all know about it.
This is not about what you can see on YouTube or the internet, it is about analyzing the images that come from the rovers exploring parts of the planet Mars.
The videos that I show here are made by myself to put my hypothesis in context, they are not something that I have found out there.
Regarding your statement that if there was something relevant about the possibility of life on that planet we would already know, let me tell you that it does not have to be this way, there are many things that we do not know about Mars and that we will not find out for sure until we put our feet there.
For example, we do not know what happens under the surface, nor do we have any sample of these rocks in our possession to be able to split it and see its interior, its density or the material of which it is formed.
Therefore my hypothesis about the "Biorocks" is as valid as the hypothesis that they are traditional rocks like those of our planet or those of the Moon.
 
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Given enough rocks, there will be many examples of similar-looking ones, we even have that here. Water and air weathering along with extreme temperature variations operate to weather them and make big rocks into small ones. With the very thin atmosphere, many more meteors reach ground making even more small rocks.
Changing light conditions can vary the appearance in many ways.
NASA and others have attributed a few that they have studied into igneous and sedimentary examples. I imagine there are some metamorphic there, too. That’s just not their primary mission.
And the Trovants are still rocks.
 

COLGeek

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Apr 3, 2020
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This is not about what you can see on YouTube or the internet, it is about analyzing the images that come from the rovers exploring parts of the planet Mars.
The videos that I show here are made by myself to put my hypothesis in context, they are not something that I have found out there.
Regarding your statement that if there was something relevant about the possibility of life on that planet we would already know, let me tell you that it does not have to be this way, there are many things that we do not know about Mars and that we will not find out for sure until we put our feet there.
For example, we do not know what happens under the surface, nor do we have any sample of these rocks in our possession to be able to split it and see its interior, its density or the material of which it is formed.
Therefore my hypothesis about the "Biorocks" is as valid as the hypothesis that they are traditional rocks like those of our planet or those of the Moon.
You are certainly welcome to your theories. They just don't appear to be rooted in reality, or science as we currently know it.

Time will certainly tell. Take care.
 
Sep 23, 2021
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Given enough rocks, there will be many examples of similar-looking ones, we even have that here. Water and air weathering along with extreme temperature variations operate to weather them and make big rocks into small ones. With the very thin atmosphere, many more meteors reach ground making even more small rocks.
Changing light conditions can vary the appearance in many ways.
NASA and others have attributed a few that they have studied into igneous and sedimentary examples. I imagine there are some metamorphic there, too. That’s just not their primary mission.
And the Trovants are still rocks.
I agree with almost everything you say, except that NASA or other scientists can rightly attribute an igneous or sedimentary origin to some of these rocks, they really don't know for sure, said by themselves.
Attached video from NASA where they mention it.

View: https://youtu.be/MuKGnY1TNFQ
 
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I have no doubt that primitive life probably exists underground in trapped water on Mars.
Mars had a long time as an Earth sort of world so life was quite probable.

On the surface i doubt even the toughest Earth microbial life would last more than a few seconds.
Mars is a nasty freeze dried, micro asteroid bombarded, solar wind/solar flare unshielded, high energy radiation blasted beast on the surface.
 
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May 25, 2021
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It's still just a bunch of rocks. I have more than of my share of rocks where I live. Try digging a hole in all that. And they shift due to the erosion of the soil they are in. We still can't speculate what's on Mars. It looks like it's mostly sand. And we have plenty of that also, but it usually only becomes dunes.
 
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Sep 23, 2021
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I have no doubt that primitive life probably exists underground in trapped water on Mars.
Mars had a long time as an Earth sort of world so life was quite probable.

On the surface i doubt even the toughest Earth microbial life would last more than a few seconds.
Mars is a nasty freeze dried, micro asteroid bombarded, solar wind/solar flare unshielded, high energy radiation blasted beast on the surface.
Yes, but don't forget the organisms known as "Extremophiles", which exist on our planet and which seem to resist almost all the most adverse environmental conditions.
 
I have no doubt that primitive life probably exists underground in trapped water on Mars.
Mars had a long time as an Earth sort of world so life was quite probable.

On the surface i doubt even the toughest Earth microbial life would last more than a few seconds.
Mars is a nasty freeze dried, micro asteroid bombarded, solar wind/solar flare unshielded, high energy radiation blasted beast on the surface.
Yes, but don't forget the organisms known as "Extremophiles", which exist on our planet and which seem to resist almost all the most adverse environmental conditions.
Water on mars surface is sadly lacking.
A serious freeze dried surface that has no free water and lots of radiation.
DNA won't exist under those conditions.
Underground as the last holdouts of life in pockets of water, sure why not.
 
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For the benefit of any others from UK:
"Caving – also known as spelunking in the United States and Canada and potholing in the United Kingdom and Ireland – is the recreational pastime of exploring wild cave systems (as distinguished from show caves)."

Cat :)
Probably a great place to look for remaining life on Mars is deep in those caves.
When the pressure is high enough for liquid water then probably find life in it.
 
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May 25, 2021
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Perhaps they are some kind of an tortoise like creature. All we are seeing is their shells. And they withdraw when they see, or detect our rovers. Just a thought.
 
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Aug 23, 2021
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For the benefit of any others from UK:
"Caving – also known as spelunking in the United States and Canada and potholing in the United Kingdom and Ireland – is the recreational pastime of exploring wild cave systems (as distinguished from show caves)."

Cat :)
So glad you explained that Cat, because I had no idea what you guys were talking about, in Australia we just call it caving!

Just a casual observation,
Are we able to apply, in the Martian situation, our terrestrial knowledge of rock science?
( I'll call it that because everything else describing rocks has an "Earth" aspect to it)

IMHO I find it difficult to believe that these objects are moving of their own accord. However, concerning their origin, we don't know the conditions whereby the rocks were formed. We need a new science called Mars Science, that will only be able to be studied properly when we can get our human hands on some of them. (The rocks)

I would err on the side of caution until I had more information.

To quote an old song: The answer my friend is blowin' in the wind, the answer is blowin' in the wind. (Bob Dylan)
 
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Catastrophe

The devil is in the detail
Probably a great place to look for remaining life on Mars is deep in those caves.
When the pressure is high enough for liquid water then probably find life in it.
But don't forget, if you have pressure in a cave below the surface, there has to be some sort of valve somewhere to retain the pressure. If you have an open entrance to a cave, however deep, the pressure will equalize. Cat :)
 
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But don't forget, if you have pressure in a cave below the surface, there has to be some sort of valve somewhere to retain the pressure. If you have an open entrance to a cave, however deep, the pressure will equalize. Cat :)
I think at about 1 mile below the surface water on mars would be retained even with an opening above.
Good question about the mechanics of a pressure vent and it's properties.

Would it just slowly loose water to the lack of pressure above or some pressure point keep the water or as soon as an opening exists is it gone pretty quick.?

Mars for sure will have volcanic tubes that have little or no opening to the surface.
Mars will have water somewhere just getting to it might be the problem.
Getting to it might be like opening a bottle of soda to the surface :)

It's an interesting thought about Mars and it's water possibilities but i think we need a weigh in from a few people with a better understanding of the mechanics.
 
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So glad you explained that Cat, because I had no idea what you guys were talking about, in Australia we just call it caving!

Just a casual observation,
Are we able to apply, in the Martian situation, our terrestrial knowledge of rock science?
( I'll call it that because everything else describing rocks has an "Earth" aspect to it)

IMHO I find it difficult to believe that these objects are moving of their own accord. However, concerning their origin, we don't know the conditions whereby the rocks were formed. We need a new science called Mars Science, that will only be able to be studied properly when we can get our human hands on some of them. (The rocks)

I would err on the side of caution until I had more information.

To quote an old song: The answer my friend is blowin' in the wind, the answer is blowin' in the wind. (Bob Dylan)
My guess is micro meteorites are the reason for movement, Mars has little protection from them.
Localized heat another reason for movement.
Wind.

Lots of reasons something could move on Mars.
Could be some form of life but if it is it won't be anything like Earth life, no reason life needs to be anything like Earth life and be tied to water like Earth is. :)
Even on the freeze dried lack of water Mars surface it's rocks contain a small % of water so a last adaptation of life might have been to harvest it.
Never say never.
 
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Aug 23, 2021
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My guess is micro meteorites are the reason for movement, Mars has little protection from them.
Localized heat another reason for movement.
Wind.

Lots of reasons something could move on Mars.
Could be some form of life but if it is it won't be anything like Earth life, no reason life needs to be anything like Earth life and be tied to water like Earth is. :)
Even on the freeze dried lack of water Mars surface it's rocks contain a small % of water so a last adaptation of life might have been to harvest it.
Never say never.
Hmm, interesting points you make.
Life, and what is it? Leads us down a completely different path.
Were Martian life nothing like life as we know it, would we even recognise it as life!
Something else to ponder. :)
No doubt wind would have an effect on the Martian landscape.
That's why I mentioned the song!
 
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Aug 23, 2021
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Just a thought: There are some 'hellish' environments on Earth, in particular the thermal areas of NZ, which I have visited and Yellowstone National Park, which I have not been to, but I have heard that is has similar thermal areas. There are other similar places around the Earth.
Living organisms/bacteria have been found in water that is/almost is at boiling point, or in sulphourous ponds, with incredibly low Ph.
So life as we know it can exist in incredibly hostile environments.
There are bacteria which enclose themselves in an impervious capsule when conditions are unsuitable and remain that way for many, many years.
My point is, if life exists on Mars, then it will have adapted to the environment it lives in and may even surprise us.
 
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