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Titan water

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zarnic

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A brief article that appeared on page 18 of <em>Scientific American</em>'s June 2008 issue tied the possibility of water being below the surface on Saturn's moon Titan to Cassini.&nbsp; With all of the interest of water on Mars is the Titan/water issue still of interest and will the Cassini flybys help? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Wisdom doesn't automatically come with old age. Nothing does - except wrinkles.</em> A. Van Buren, 1978<br />* <em>An unbreakable toy is useful for breaking other toys.</em>  -- according to Van Roy</p> </div>
 
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Boris_Badenov

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>A brief article that appeared on page 18 of Scientific American's June 2008 issue tied the possibility of water being below the surface on Saturn's moon Titan to Cassini.&nbsp; With all of the interest of water on Mars is the Titan/water issue still of interest and will the Cassini flybys help? <br />Posted by zarnic</DIV> </p><p><font size="2">Is there a chance you could provide a link to the article, or at least some quotes from the article that further explain your question?<br /><br /></font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font color="#993300"><span class="body"><font size="2" color="#3366ff"><div align="center">. </div><div align="center">Never roll in the mud with a pig. You'll both get dirty & the pig likes it.</div></font></span></font> </div>
 
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derekmcd

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'> Is there a chance you could provide a link to the article, or at least some quotes from the article that further explain your question? <br /> Posted by boris1961</DIV></p><p>Here's one from March:</p><p>http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=signs-of-hidden-ocean-under-titans-crust</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div> </div><br /><div><span style="color:#0000ff" class="Apple-style-span">"If something's hard to do, then it's not worth doing." - Homer Simpson</span></div> </div>
 
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3488

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'><font color="#ff0000">Here's one from March:http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=signs-of-hidden-ocean-under-titans-crust <br />Posted by derekmcd</font></DIV></p><p><strong><font size="2">Yes that's it. I do not think there are any further updates.</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">I think caution has be used for now, as the article states that other factors could be at play here, such as winds blowing against hills, hydrocarbon lakes shoshing around, etc causing a rocking motion.</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">Titan is not the first suspected of having a disconnected ice crust. Jupiter's moon Europa is also suspected.</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">With Titan, there is evidence of cryovolcanism, particularly with Ganesa Macula, a large 1,500 metre tall, 180 KM wide cryoshield volcano.</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">http://www.photodump.com/Anonymous/Ganesa%20Macula%20cryovolcano%20180%20KM%20diameter%2013%20January%202007%20Ca.html</font></strong><br /><img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/15/14/dfed91d2-0a3a-4736-ae14-7604f61c992d.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></p><p><strong><font size="2">Ganesa Macula & area to the east, 570 KM across. Note what looks like flow features, not to unlike in appearance to the lava flow fronts at Sobo Fluctus on the Jupiter moon Io. With Io, it will be silicate lavas, where as with Titan, the cryolava will likely be a water & ammonia mix, but the forms they take&nbsp;will be very similar.</font></strong></p><p><font size="2" color="#000080"><strong>http://www.photodump.com/Anonymous/PIA09176%20Ganesa%20Macula%20cryovolcano%20570%20x%20390%20KM%2013%20January%202.html</strong></font><br /><img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/0/4/50618294-b5d1-47f5-a4e1-7e5e9fa5149c.Medium.jpg" alt="" /><br /><br /><strong><font size="2" color="#000000">Andrew Brown.</font></strong></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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zarnic

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Yes that's it. I do not think there are any further updates.I think caution has be used for now, as the article states that other factors could be at play here, such as winds blowing against hills, hydrocarbon lakes shoshing around, etc causing a rocking motion.Titan is not the first suspected of having a disconnected ice crust. Jupiter's moon Europa is also suspected.With Titan, there is evidence of cryovolcanism, particularly with Ganesa Macula, a large 1,500 metre tall, 180 KM wide cryoshield volcano.http://www.photodump.com/Anonymous/Ganesa%20Macula%20cryovolcano%20180%20KM%20diameter%2013%20January%202007%20Ca.htmlGanesa Macula & area to the east, 570 KM across. Note what looks like flow features, not to unlike in appearance to the lava flow fronts at Sobo Fluctus on the Jupiter moon Io. With Io, it will be silicate lavas, where as with Titan, the cryolava will likely be a water & ammonia mix, but the forms they take&nbsp;will be very similar.http://www.photodump.com/Anonymous/PIA09176%20Ganesa%20Macula%20cryovolcano%20570%20x%20390%20KM%2013%20January%202.htmlAndrew Brown. <br />Posted by 3488</DIV></p><p><strong>Thank You!</strong> Guess with all of the recent PR about Mars we have forgotten that the possibility of water ... er, life on Titan may have, or does, &nbsp;exist.<br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Wisdom doesn't automatically come with old age. Nothing does - except wrinkles.</em> A. Van Buren, 1978<br />* <em>An unbreakable toy is useful for breaking other toys.</em>  -- according to Van Roy</p> </div>
 
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