Utilizing and landing permanently designed probes set up for long term space travel affixed to Asteroid's traveling through space to retrieve data

Jan 30, 2020
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Interplanetary space travel by humans into deep space is or is not yet a reality, and the concept of building actual interplanetary spacecraft with all the sustainable provisions needed is possibly somewhat out of the realm our imagination at this point in time, using Star Trek as a reference of spacecraft and deep space traveling.
Even though Voyager 1 and 2 has traveled great distances and retrieved substantial data that they have reported back to Earth; which in my opinion I am sure has been very beneficial to space exploration, and I am not sure if we have launched any other deep space satellites or exploration probes to explore other deep space regions that peak our interest.
NASA, SpaceX, and/or other space agencies that might be interested in locating and mapping asteroid trajectories of space travel through areas of space that would otherwise be impossible for us to reach, and by landing and affixing data gathering exploration probes to ride on certain selected asteroids that's path of travel has been predetermined in order to collect data that otherwise we would not have the opportunity to retrieve, and by utilizing these asteroids traveling through space using only power sources needed to keep probe(s) in service, and no other fuel source would be needed after touchdown.
Since we are already able to land on these moving objects and collect data, why not utilize them to observe areas in space we are more interested in collecting data from.
 

Wolfshadw

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Apr 1, 2020
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Assuming you mean interstellar (between stars) space travel and affixing a probe to an object like Oumuamua, the problem is they are traveling too fast for any of our space craft to catch up to.

-Wolf sends
 
Oct 16, 2020
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"Interplanetary space travel by humans into deep space is or is not yet a reality" =- like in real life, in our current time 2020? Earthlings have not officially conducted interplanetary space travel, they have traveled to objects in Outerspace, ie the moon. The moon is not a planet so no. Humans have not officially conducted interplanetary space travel. They have sent 'probes" around and onto into other planets.




"and the concept of building actual interplanetary spacecraft with all the sustainable provisions needed is possibly somewhat out of the realm our imagination at this point in time, using Star Trek as a reference of spacecraft and deep space traveling."

It is totally possible but the cost and effort of doing such a thing is not within the realm of willingness for most people.
The big issue is actually radiation. It can be overcome. The main issue is that we would need to have a space industry to build such a massive object, and that would take us creating methods to harvest resources from the earth, moon or any other low gravity objects. It is totally doable. Frankly though Earth is pretty hot real estate compared to space. Aliens that like terrestrial environments would totally be down with earth.


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Even though Voyager 1 and 2 has traveled great distances and retrieved substantial data that they have reported back to Earth; which in my opinion I am sure has been very beneficial to space exploration, and I am not sure if we have launched any other deep space satellites or exploration probes to explore other deep space regions that peak our interest."

Yeah they do that, the problem is that it is pretty costly to send stuff into space to look at rocks and ice.



"NASA, SpaceX, and/or other space agencies that might be interested in locating and mapping asteroid trajectories of space travel through areas of space that would otherwise be impossible for us to reach, and by landing and affixing data gathering exploration probes to ride on certain selected asteroids that's path of travel has been predetermined in order to collect data that otherwise we would not have the opportunity to retrieve, and by utilizing these asteroids traveling through space using only power sources needed to keep probe(s) in service, and no other fuel source would be needed after touchdown."

Yeah they have left probes on aseteroids already. The problem is getting the signal. Near earth objects can be difficult to track so you need something that is large enough to track. While these things can be intercepted... part of the problem is tracking some of these objects is still not a perfect science so plotting an intercept can be spotty. But no they are working on asteroid interception projects. They want to use them for mining though. However you need to think this as a docking procedure you want a soft landing if you make a hard contact with something moving very fast, you will cause a collision and things of lessor hardness and mass have bad results from that. You need very high speed probes to dock with very high speed asteroids. You could try slingshoting stuff or experimental mass driver/ion drives to spool up to high speed but again things like shiva star can be costly.



"Since we are already able to land on these moving objects and collect data, why not utilize them to observe areas in space we are more interested in collecting data from."

NASA has a budget.. they have lots of stuff on the table to pick from. They don't have the money to do everything they want.
 
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May 1, 2021
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What makes far more sense is sending robots to distant solar systems for exploration. They don't need water and food and can go to sleep for as long as a journey takes. I believe every UFO visiting this planet contains a highly intelligent robot, not a living biological being. If our intelligent extrasolar neighbors are smart enough to construct vehicles capable of making such long-distance journeys, they're smart enough to use robots for the reasons I just stated.
 
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May 1, 2021
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Assuming you mean interstellar (between stars) space travel and affixing a probe to an object like Oumuamua, the problem is they are traveling too fast for any of our space craft to catch up to.

-Wolf sends
Oumuamua is intriguing and so are the physics-defying feats being reported by UFO observers. Perhaps there is a shortcut that violates the speed of light. Perhaps only robots can survive taking it. If we ever do encounter an ET, I expect it to be a robot.
 
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May 14, 2021
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Anchoring a probe to an asteroid would not be for observing objects as it would not approach any but it would be a great way to observe the space environment as well as the anchoring body on a long term basis. Icarus or similar comes to mind as it’s orbit crosses those planets from Mercury to Mars. Icarus rotates way too fast, but, there are others we could use.
 
Jun 15, 2021
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I think if it is not possible to land a satellite or research ship on an asteroid, then it would be possible to send there from a ship or a satellite some kind of wireless sensors that would bite into its surface for fixation and take samples, take pictures, etc. ... and send it all back, and from this it would be possible to draw conclusions and conduct research.
 

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