Aleins? Real or Not?

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Thinker_of_many_Things

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I believe that aliens are real because you cannot deny the fact that there is no other life forms besides us. There are so many galexies in this universe. Another question is that is there more than one universe? People who have "suposededly" been ubducted have some pretty crazy stories, but what can you belive on tv now-a-days. What about summerged ufo's? Like in the Mariones Trench? Who knows whats in there. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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derekmcd

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I believe that aliens are real because you <strong>cannot deny the fact</strong> that there is no other life forms besides us.<br /> Posted by Thinker_of_many_Things</DIV></p><p>[emphasis mine]</p><p>What facts do you have that cannot be denied?&nbsp; </p><p>I believe until we find that life spontaneously developed somewhere other than Earth, all we can do is speculate.&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div> </div><br /><div><span style="color:#0000ff" class="Apple-style-span">"If something's hard to do, then it's not worth doing." - Homer Simpson</span></div> </div>
 
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qso1

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<p><font color="#800080">I believe that aliens are real because you cannot deny the fact that there is no other life forms besides us. There are so many galexies in this universe.</font></p><p>Unfortunately, we have absolutely zero proof at this time as to life outside Earth. The old "We are alone" scenario is till a possibility although we will never be able to prove it. It might also be that we are the first life forms but that too, can never be proven.</p><p>If we find life say, on mars. Microbial life that is, the life question is not only answered. But with two planets in the same solar system having life...it would make life, at least the simplest life forms...quite common in the Universe. It also seems highly unlikely that the first two scenarios I mentioned, would be true.&nbsp;</p><p><font color="#800080">Another question is that is there more than one universe?</font></p><p>It used to be the word Universe was supposed to encompass everything. Nowadays you hear terms like Multiverse, Omniverse and other Universes. There could well be other Universes or whatever one chooses to call them. The problem right now is that we cannot see beyond the one were in.&nbsp;</p><p><font color="#800080">People who have "suposededly" been ubducted have some pretty crazy stories, but what can you belive on tv now-a-days. What about summerged ufo's? Like in the Mariones Trench? Who knows whats in there. Posted by Thinker_of_many_Things</font></p><p>There are some wild stories out there, thats for sure. But as far as UFO activity. There is as yet, no proof that UFOs are alien piloted craft. They are possibly that and of course, maybe there are a few in the Marianas trench but we have no reliable evidence of this. The Marianas trench is an interesting place. Deepest known area under the sea and around 1960, the site of a human exploration mission. Unfortunately, I can't recall the details of that. I'll have to search on the web to see if anything has changed since then.&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong>My borrowed quote for the time being:</strong></p><p><em>There are three kinds of people in life. Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen...and those who do not know what happened.</em></p> </div>
 
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Boris_Badenov

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'> The Marianas trench is an interesting place. Deepest known area under the sea and around 1960, the site of a human exploration mission. Unfortunately, I can't recall the details of that. I'll have to search on the web to see if anything has changed since then.&nbsp; <br />Posted by qso1</DIV></p><p><br /><br /><font size="3">Mariana Trench</font></p><p><span class="mw-headline"><font size="2">Descents</font></span></p><div class="thumb tright"><div class="thumbinner" style="width:182px"><font size="2"><img class="thumbimage" src="http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/3d/Trieste_%2823_Jan_1960%29.jpeg/180px-Trieste_%2823_Jan_1960%29.jpeg" border="0" alt="January 23, 1960: Trieste just before the dive" width="180" height="144" /></font><font size="2"> </font><div class="thumbcaption"><div class="magnify"><font size="2"><img src="http://sitelife.space.com/skins-1.5/common/images/magnify-clip.png" alt="" width="15" height="11" /></font></div><font size="2">January 23</font><font size="2">, </font><font size="2">1960</font><font size="2">: <em>Trieste</em> just before the dive</font></div></div></div><p><font size="2">The </font><font size="2">United States Navy</font><font size="2"> </font><font size="2">bathyscaphe</font><font size="2"> <em>Trieste</em> reached the bottom at 1:06 p.m. on </font><font size="2">January 23</font><font size="2">, </font><font size="2">1960</font><font size="2">, with U.S. Navy Lieutenant </font><font size="2">Don Walsh</font><font size="2"> and </font><font size="2">Jacques Piccard</font><font size="2"> on board.<sup class="reference">[1]</sup> </font><font size="2">Iron shot</font><font size="2"> was used for </font><font size="2">ballast</font><font size="2">, with </font><font size="2">gasoline</font><font size="2"> for </font><font size="2">buoyancy</font><font size="2">.<sup class="reference">[1]</sup> The onboard systems indicated a depth of 11,521 meters (37,799&nbsp;ft), but this was later revised to 10,916 meters (35,813&nbsp;ft).<sup class="noprint Template-Fact"><span style="white-space:nowrap">[<em>citation needed</em>]</span></sup> At the bottom, Walsh and Piccard were surprised to discover </font><font size="2">soles</font><font size="2"> or </font><font size="2">flounder</font><font size="2"> about 30&nbsp;cm (1&nbsp;ft) long,<sup class="reference">[6]</sup> as well as </font><font size="2">shrimp</font><font size="2">.<sup class="noprint Template-Fact"><span style="white-space:nowrap">[<em>citation needed</em>]</span></sup> According to Piccard, "The bottom appeared light and clear, a waste of firm </font><font size="2">diatomaceous</font><font size="2"> ooze".<sup class="reference">[6]</sup></font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font color="#993300"><span class="body"><font size="2" color="#3366ff"><div align="center">. </div><div align="center">Never roll in the mud with a pig. You'll both get dirty & the pig likes it.</div></font></span></font> </div>
 
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qso1

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<p>Wow, thanks for the link boris1961. Sure jogged my memory.&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong>My borrowed quote for the time being:</strong></p><p><em>There are three kinds of people in life. Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen...and those who do not know what happened.</em></p> </div>
 
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Smersh

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>... If we find life say, on mars. Microbial life that is, the life question is not only answered. But with two planets in the same solar system having life...it would make life, at least the simplest life forms...quite common in the Universe ... <br /> Posted by qso1</DIV></p><p>I agree with the OP that there is quite likely other life in the Universe, but I disagree that finding any life on Mars, microbial or otherwise, would prove that. Surely, all that would prove is that there is life on Earth and Mars, wouldn't it?. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <h1 style="margin:0pt;font-size:12px">----------------------------------------------------- </h1><p><font color="#800000"><em>Lady Nancy Astor: "Winston, if you were my husband, I'd poison your tea."<br />Churchill: "Nancy, if you were my wife, I'd drink it."</em></font></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>Website / forums </strong></font></p> </div>
 
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qso1

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<p><font color="#800080">I agree with the OP that there is quite likely other life in the Universe, but I disagree that finding any life on Mars, microbial or otherwise, would prove that. Surely, all that would prove is that there is life on Earth and Mars, wouldn't it?. Posted by Smersh</font></p><p>Correct, finding life on mars and confirming the find to be indigeonous to mars would prove life on earth and mars. Finding and confirming martian biology would greatly strengthen the argument for commonality of microbiological life in other systems, but would not prove that.&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong>My borrowed quote for the time being:</strong></p><p><em>There are three kinds of people in life. Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen...and those who do not know what happened.</em></p> </div>
 
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derekmcd

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I agree with the OP that there is quite likely other life in the Universe, but I disagree that finding any life on Mars, microbial or otherwise, would prove that. Surely, all that would prove is that there is life on Earth and Mars, wouldn't it?. <br /> Posted by Smersh</DIV></p><p>I think it is more of a comfort factor when coming to a conclusion.&nbsp; If you only have one object, you have no reason to conclude there is more than one.&nbsp; If you have two of the same object, then you can conclude, with 100% certainty, there is more than one.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><p>If there's more than one, than the possibility of more than two is signifcantly increased.&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div> </div><br /><div><span style="color:#0000ff" class="Apple-style-span">"If something's hard to do, then it's not worth doing." - Homer Simpson</span></div> </div>
 
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qso1

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<p>Exactly.&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong>My borrowed quote for the time being:</strong></p><p><em>There are three kinds of people in life. Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen...and those who do not know what happened.</em></p> </div>
 
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majornature

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I believe that aliens are real because you cannot deny the fact that there is no other life forms besides us. There are so many galexies in this universe. Another question is that is there more than one universe? People who have "suposededly" been ubducted have some pretty crazy stories, but what can you belive on tv now-a-days. What about summerged ufo's? Like in the Mariones Trench? Who knows whats in there. <br />Posted by Thinker_of_many_Things</DIV></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>I am proof that aliens are real...I may look like an earther but I'm not....</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font size="2" color="#14ea50"><strong><font size="1">We are born.  We live.  We experiment.  We rot.  We die.  and the whole process starts all over again!  Imagine That!</font><br /><br /><br /><img id="6e5c6b4c-0657-47dd-9476-1fbb47938264" style="width:176px;height:247px" src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/14/4/6e5c6b4c-0657-47dd-9476-1fbb47938264.Large.jpg" alt="blog post photo" width="276" height="440" /><br /></strong></font> </div>
 
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DrRocket

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I agree with the OP that there is quite likely other life in the Universe, but I disagree that finding any life on Mars, microbial or otherwise, would prove that. Surely, all that would prove is that there is life on Earth and Mars, wouldn't it?. Posted by SmershCorrect, finding life on mars and confirming the find to be indigeonous to mars would prove life on earth and mars. Finding and confirming martian biology would greatly strengthen the argument for commonality of microbiological life in other systems, but would not prove that.&nbsp; <br />Posted by qso1</DIV></p><p>Suppose we find life, say microbial life, on Mars.&nbsp; And suppose it is similar to microbial life on Earth, with DNA.&nbsp; Do you conclude that such life is likely to arise naturally in many places, or do you conclude that there was once some sort of interaction between Mars and Earth, something that sent material from one planet to the other ?<br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Suppose we find life, say microbial life, on Mars.&nbsp; And suppose it is similar to microbial life on Earth, with DNA.&nbsp; Do you conclude that such life is likely to arise naturally in many places, or do you conclude that there was once some sort of interaction between Mars and Earth, something that sent material from one planet to the other ? <br />Posted by DrRocket</DIV><br /><br />That's a hard one Dr R. We know earth and Mars can (and have, in at least the Mars - /> earth direction) exchanged material, so if it's very similar, a common origin seems likely, but not guaranteed. </p><p>Let's see when we find it <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-wink.gif" border="0" alt="Wink" title="Wink" /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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thor06

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I think it is more of a comfort factor when coming to a conclusion.&nbsp; If you only have one object, you have no reason to conclude there is more than one.&nbsp; If you have two of the same object, then you can conclude, with 100% certainty, there is more than one.&nbsp;&nbsp;If there's more than one, than the possibility of more than two is signifcantly increased.&nbsp; <br /> Posted by derekmcd</DIV></p><p>If we find microbes past or present on mars, it would fill in another part of the Drake equation. <font size="5">F</font>l&nbsp; </p><p>&nbsp;http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drake_equation</p><p>&nbsp;We could say with more confidence, 100% of planets cabable of supporting life, will at some point.&nbsp; Planetary transfer and/or seperate origin.&nbsp; I.E. If we find microbes that are Martian in origin, then life readily develops on planets in the "life zone".&nbsp; If the microbes are Earth transfer or vice versa, then even if life does not develop on its own in the "life zone" transfer is likely.&nbsp; Thus for the purpose of the Drake equation "Are there alien civilizations out there, if so how many?"&nbsp; The answer would be closer to the 10,000 or so planets in our galaxy that have civilizations capable of communication.&nbsp; This does not however, speak to; are they here?&nbsp; The distances between stars are so great, it seams unlikely, but not impossible.&nbsp; We must humble ourselves to the idea; we don't know everything, and there may be ways around the "cosmic speed limit 186,000 mi./sec."</p><p>Personally, I find the pilot encounters with a corresponding radar target quite interesting.<img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-smile.gif" border="0" alt="Smile" title="Smile" /> </p><p>The bottem line:&nbsp; Until an alien shows up and says "we come in peace" and/or "move or die" the rational conclusion is, no visitors.</p><p>Marianas trench has also been drilled and sampled.&nbsp; I remember hearing at one point scientists thought it might be possible to sample the upper mantle.</p><p>http://www.smarterscience.net/marianatrenchgeology.html&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p><img src="file:///C:/DOCUME%7E1/COMPAQ%7E1/LOCALS%7E1/Temp/moz-screenshot.jpg" alt="" /><br /> <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/10/13/6a2c7730-2b60-4d2b-9d3f-e2308aad7d72.Medium.png" alt="" /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p> <font color="#0000ff">                           www.watchnasatv.com</font></p><p>                          ONE PERCENT FOR NASA! </p> </div>
 
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qso1

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<p><font color="#800080">Suppose we find life, say microbial life, on Mars.&nbsp; And suppose it is similar to microbial life on Earth, with DNA.&nbsp; Do you conclude that such life is likely to arise naturally in many places, or do you conclude that there was once some sort of interaction between Mars and Earth, something that sent material from one planet to the other ? <br /> Posted by DrRocket</font></p>It would not be entirely conclusive IMO as long as we cannot be 100% certain that there actually was some sort of interaction between earth and mars. This is an excellent point and may well cause future problems should anything be found on mars and especially if the DNA is similar to earth organism DNA.<p><font color="#000000">Keep in mind what I originally said as well..."Finding and confirming martian biology would greatly strengthen the </font><font color="#000000">argument for commonality of microbiological life in other systems, but would not prove that". It is the point that your making among a few others, including the Viking result debacle, that has caused me to become an advocate for a base on mars.</font></p><p><font color="#000000">A position I reached back during the Viking mission era when deciding whether humans should go into space at all. Ideally, it should be robotics and human missions working together to answer the question of whether life on mars was the result of an independant Genesis if you will, or whether interaction brought earthly organisms to mars and/or vice versa.</font></p><p><font color="#000000">I suspect if we rely solely on robotic or even human missions, scientists will be debating the question long after any discovery might be made and not reaching a conclusion...Viking results squared or cubed. Even with humans on mars the conclusion of what any discovery there would mean will not arise overnight. The drawback to a human mission being the possibility of inadvertant human induced contamination.</font></p><p><font color="#000000">A combination of remote robotic missions working independantly on the surface away from potential human mars base contamination might be one way to reduce reaching a wrong conclusion based solely on either robotic or human missions alone.</font></p><p><font color="#000000">I can only hope that something about martian biology if found, will set it well apart enough from any earthly example (Radically different DNA) that earth mars interaction or human induced contamination would not likely be a viable scenario.</font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong>My borrowed quote for the time being:</strong></p><p><em>There are three kinds of people in life. Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen...and those who do not know what happened.</em></p> </div>
 
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qso1

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<p><font color="#800080">Marianas trench has also been drilled and sampled.&nbsp; I remember hearing at one point scientists thought it might be possible to sample the upper mantle.http://www.smarterscience.net/marianatrenchgeology.html <br /> Posted by thor06</font></p><p>That makes sense logically because they would be that much closer to the upper mantle. Practically speaking however, the task would still be quite difficult and of course, expensive. I haven't really heard much about the trench as far as recent research or diving activity.&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong>My borrowed quote for the time being:</strong></p><p><em>There are three kinds of people in life. Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen...and those who do not know what happened.</em></p> </div>
 
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DrRocket

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>That's a hard one Dr R. We know earth and Mars can (and have, in at least the Mars - /> earth direction) exchanged material, so if it's very similar, a common origin seems likely, but not guaranteed. Let's see when we find it <br />Posted by MeteorWayne</DIV></p><p>Do we really know that ?&nbsp; I have heard rumors of material supposedly having come from Mars, but have not been able to confirm that it is really true.<br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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eburacum45

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<p>Martian Meteorites: a list by NASA/JPL. http://www2.jpl.nasa.gov/snc/</p><p>If life on Mars turns out to be related to life on Earth, then the possibility of so-called lithopanspermia within the Solar System is increased. http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/L/lithopans.html</p><p>but the possibility of lithopanspermia <strong>within</strong> our system does not really tell us anything about the possibilty of ife <strong>elsewhere</strong>. For all we know our solar system might be the only one with life in the Universe.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>---------------------------------------------------------------</p><p>http://orionsarm.com  http://thestarlark.blogspot.com/</p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Do we really know that ?&nbsp; I have heard rumors of material supposedly having come from Mars, but have not been able to confirm that it is really true. <br />Posted by DrRocket</DIV><br /><br />As you can see from the link above, we have a decent inventory of Martian meteorites that have been found on earth.</p><p>Different types from different locations on Mars.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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thor06

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Martian Meteorites: a list by NASA/JPL. http://www2.jpl.nasa.gov/snc/If life on Mars turns out to be related to life on Earth, then the possibility of so-called lithopanspermia within the Solar System is increased. http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/L/lithopans.htmlbut the possibility of lithopanspermia within our system does not really tell us anything about the possibilty of ife elsewhere. For all we know our solar system might be the only one with life in the Universe. <br /> Posted by eburacum45</DIV></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>I disagree, the galactic soup that was the beginning of our solar system, is similiar to many others.&nbsp; Start with the same recipie and the results will at times be similar.&nbsp; We are dealing with hundreds of thousands of systems in our galaxy alone. So, IMO finding microbes on Mars would in fact tell us more about the possibility of life elsewhere.&nbsp; Your final point is still true, but it becomes less and less likely, the more life we find. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p> <font color="#0000ff">                           www.watchnasatv.com</font></p><p>                          ONE PERCENT FOR NASA! </p> </div>
 
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