closing in on the origin of Mars’ larger moon

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JonClarke

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<font face="Verdana" size="1" color="#000000"><span style="font-weight:bold;font-size:8.5pt;color:black;font-family:Verdana">Lots of great images and interesting possibilities on the composition, structure, and origin of Phobos</span></font><font face="Times New Roman" size="3" color="#800080"><span style="font-size:12pt;font-family:'TimesNewRoman'">http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEM8MUSG7MF_0.html</span></font> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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3488

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'><font color="#ff0000">Lots of great images and interesting possibilities on the composition, structure, and origin of <font color="#000080"><font color="#ff0000">Phobos</font>http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEM8MUSG7MF_0.html <br /></font>Posted by jonclarke</font></DIV></p><p><strong><font size="2">Thank you very much Jon.</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">I still favour the captured type D asteroid model, very similar to many of the asteroids&nbsp;in outer part of the Asteroid Belt & Jupiter's far flung companions such as Carme, Pasiphae, etc.</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">The images are incredible. I will be back later to contribute my own crops & enlargements here. WOnder when we will see the MARSIS data too. The porousity of the bulk of Phobos & ever increasing accurate density of Phobos will reveal so much.</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">I think it is time for a very close pass of Deimos too, to repeat the same observations there. Dunno if Mars Express can reach that far out?</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">Andrew Brown.</font></strong></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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JonClarke

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<p>I don't know either.&nbsp; I would depend on how much propellant MExhas left.&nbsp; Maybe at the end of the mission?.&nbsp; </p><p>Jon</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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silylene old

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Lots of great images and interesting possibilities on the composition, structure, and origin of Phoboshttp://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Mars_Express/SEM8MUSG7MF_0.html <br />Posted by jonclarke</DIV></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Wow, thanks for the link , and a new desktop photo !<br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature" align="center"><em><font color="#0000ff">- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -</font></em> </div><div class="Discussion_UserSignature" align="center"><font color="#0000ff"><em>I really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function.</em></font> </div> </div>
 
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JonClarke

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<p>The rubble pile origin seems more likely (although the low density could also be from ice).&nbsp; the idea that its reddish colour could be due to accretion entirely from martian debris is tantalising (although small amounts of martian material of the surface has been suggested for some time).</p><p>Jon</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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3488

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'><font color="#ff0000">The rubble pile origin seems more likely (although the low density could also be from ice).&nbsp; the idea that its reddish colour could be due to accretion entirely from martian debris is tantalising (although small amounts of martian material of the surface has been suggested for some time).Jon <br /> Posted by jonclarke</font></DIV></p><p><strong><font size="2">Hi Jon,</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">Whilst I have no problem with debris from Mars being on the surface of Phobos, in fact I would expect that, I'm not so sure of Phobos being made of Martian debris.</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">Phobos & Deimos, both to me anyway, scream at being captured asteroids from at least the outer part of the Asteroid Belt, where many type C & D reside (there are far fewer within the inner part of the Asteroid Belt though some such as 253 Mathilde have perihelia within the inner part of the belt).</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">Both Phobos & Deimos appear to be more like the outer members of the Asteroid Belt & even some of Jupiter's far flung moons such as Carme, Sinope & Pasiphae. I think Phobos & Deimos share a common origin with these. </font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">Chances are. I'm wrong, but with information to hand, that's my best bet. I really hope a future Jupiter system mission or at least a Jupiter slingshot encounter, will pass one of Jupiter's outermost retrograding moons closely & then we can compare with Phobos & / or Deimos.</font></strong></p><p><strong><font size="2">We'll see.&nbsp;</font></strong></p><p><font size="2"><strong>A couple of MEX images I have worked on.</strong></font></p><p><font size="5">Phobos Stickney end. </font><br /> <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/0/5/e0688079-898f-4345-a534-21fe4e4b2494.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></p><p><br /><font size="5">Phobos long rille. </font><br /> <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/1/8/112fe3eb-5649-46aa-9876-e8690b1db584.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></p><p><br /><font size="2"><strong>Andrew Brown.&nbsp;</strong></font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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