first post / black holes and baby universes

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moonchef

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<p>Hello, let me first start off by saying that im not a scientist or even a student (yet).&nbsp; i've been somewhat trolling the space forum for a few months now and its been pretty exciting reading the debates and posts, i've learned quite a lot and done a&nbsp;lot of my own research to better understand the topcis being discussed.</p><p>With that said i just finished reading my first physics type book, black holes and baby universes.&nbsp; i've got my questions about the book, but i think its more about understanding the vocabulary and terminology (the mathmatical equations are obviously over my head for now).&nbsp; My question is a simple one really.&nbsp; Does anyone have any reccomendations on any more good physics books?&nbsp; im honestly a little worried about older publications mostly because i can gather that therioes and ideas are for the most part constantly being changed or tweaked.&nbsp; i figured that reading a hawking book was safe read for someone like me with limited knowledge on the subject.</p><p>On the book itself i just have one question.&nbsp; Imaginary time.&nbsp; i understand what he means by it, but is it an idea that just sort of fizzled out over the years.&nbsp; i havent seen any mention of it here and in the book he basically describes imaginary time as "the next big thing".&nbsp; just curious.&nbsp; thx in adavance.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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DrRocket

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Hello, let me first start off by saying that im not a scientist or even a student (yet).&nbsp; i've been somewhat trolling the space forum for a few months now and its been pretty exciting reading the debates and posts, i've learned quite a lot and done a&nbsp;lot of my own research to better understand the topcis being discussed.With that said i just finished reading my first physics type book, black holes and baby universes.&nbsp; i've got my questions about the book, but i think its more about understanding the vocabulary and terminology (the mathmatical equations are obviously over my head for now).&nbsp; My question is a simple one really.&nbsp; Does anyone have any reccomendations on any more good physics books?&nbsp; im honestly a little worried about older publications mostly because i can gather that therioes and ideas are for the most part constantly being changed or tweaked.&nbsp; i figured that reading a hawking book was safe read for someone like me with limited knowledge on the subject.On the book itself i just have one question.&nbsp; Imaginary time.&nbsp; i understand what he means by it, but is it an idea that just sort of fizzled out over the years.&nbsp; i havent seen any mention of it here and in the book he basically describes imaginary time as "the next big thing".&nbsp; just curious.&nbsp; thx in adavance. <br />Posted by moonchef</DIV></p><p>Here are some good books on physics for a general audience (little or no math required)</p><p>A Brief History of Time -- Hawking</p><p>The Character of Physical Law -- Feynman</p><p>The First Three Minutes -- Weinberg</p><p>The Inflationary Universe -- Guth</p><p>Black Holes, Geons and Quantum Foam -- Wheeler</p><p>The Emperor's New Mind -- Penrose</p><p>The God Particle -- Lederman</p><p>Black Holes and Time Warps; Einstein's Outrageous Legacy -- Thorne</p><p>I would not worry too much about the older books.&nbsp; The exception might be that some of Weinberg's notions in The First Three Minutes may require some modification in light of the more recent data that the expansion of the universe is accelerating and in light of Guth's theory of inflation -- but the basic ideas remain true. </p><p>If you understand the notion of imaginary (complex) time then you are one up on almost everyone else.&nbsp; As far as I know that notion came to nothing and is not being pursued.&nbsp; It is in fact rather difficult to fathom, as the complex numbers are not ordered and we clearly see time as progressing in some direction, which we call the future.</p><p>If you get to a point where you are interested in a more rigorous and mathematical treatment of physics then Feynman's lectures from a 1960's freshman class at Cal Tech remains one of the very best physics books ever written -- The Feynman Lectures on Physics. <br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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weeman

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<p>To add to DrRocket's list:</p><p>The Elegant Universe -- Brian Greene </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><strong><font color="#ff0000">Techies: We do it in the dark. </font></strong></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>"Put your hand on a stove for a minute and it seems like an hour. Sit with that special girl for an hour and it seems like a minute. That's relativity.</strong><strong>" -Albert Einstein </strong></font></p> </div>
 
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DrRocket

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>To add to DrRocket's list:The Elegant Universe -- Brian Greene <br />Posted by weeman</DIV></p><p>Nice add,</p><p>His other book, The Fabric of the Cosmos is pretty good too.<br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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moonchef

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<p>Thanks for the tips!&nbsp; Gonna head down to the library and see what i can dig up :)</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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