Hubble Space Telescope – Servicing Mission 4

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SM4_Engineer

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The 6<sup>th</sup> Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Space Shuttle mission is less than two months away. The crew of Atlantis is scheduled to spend five days upgrading and repairing the telescope in the most ambitious mission to date. The Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) include: <p class="MsoNormal">EVA Day 1:</p> <ul><li>Camera replacement (WFPC2 out/WFC3 in). </li><li>Replace batteries (half).</li></ul> <p class="MsoNormal">EVA Day 2:</p> <ul><li>Replace gyros (6).</li><li>Replace batteries (half).</li></ul> <p class="MsoNormal">EVA Day 3:</p> <ul><li>Replace instrument (corrective optics out/COS spectrograph in).</li><li>Repair the ACS camera (part 1).</li></ul> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;EVA Day 4:</p> <ul><li>Repair the STIS spectrograph.</li><li>Thermal blanket repairs.</li></ul> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;EVA Day 5</p> <ul><li>Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS #2) replacement.</li><li>Repair the ACS camera (part 2).</li><li>Thermal blanket repairs.</li></ul> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;<br />This is truly a spaceflight adventure. Seven shuttle astronauts working on one of the greatest telescopes of all time with a second shuttle poised to rescue the first if needed. <span>&nbsp;</span>I hope you can follow along as this mission unfolds. I&rsquo;m current working on SM4 and am happy to engaging in discussion when possible. Let&rsquo;s keep this thread focused on the servicing of the telescope. Shuttle flight questions are better served over on the STS-125 thread.</p> <p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;<br />Go Atlantis!</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>The 6th Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Space Shuttle mission is less than two months away. The crew of Atlantis is scheduled to spend five days upgrading and repairing the telescope in the most ambitious mission to date. The Extra-Vehicular Activities (EVA) include: EVA Day 1: Camera replacement (WFPC2 out/WFC3 in). Replace batteries (half). EVA Day 2: Replace gyros (6).Replace batteries (half). EVA Day 3: Replace instrument (corrective optics out/COS spectrograph in).Repair the ACS camera (part 1). &nbsp;EVA Day 4: Repair the STIS spectrograph.Thermal blanket repairs. &nbsp;EVA Day 5 Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS #2) replacement.Repair the ACS camera (part 2).Thermal blanket repairs. &nbsp;This is truly a spaceflight adventure. Seven shuttle astronauts working on one of the greatest telescopes of all time with a second shuttle poised to rescue the first if needed. &nbsp;I hope you can follow along as this mission unfolds. I&rsquo;m current working on SM4 and am happy to engaging in discussion when possible. Let&rsquo;s keep this thread focused on the servicing of the telescope. Shuttle flight questions are better served over on the STS-125 thread. &nbsp;Go Atlantis! <br />Posted by SM4_Engineer</DIV></p><p>There's already a long thread on this subject under the title STS 125</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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SM4_Engineer

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>There's already a long thread on this subject under the title STS 125 <br /> Posted by MeteorWayne</DIV></p><p>"Shuttle flight questions are better served over on the STS-125 thread."</p><p>Wayne - That is a great flight thread that I have been monitoring but there is little about the servicing of the telescope. I started this thread for those who'd like to focus on the servicing aspects of the mission. I'm a telescope guy and not a shuttle guy (although both are great). This is a huge mission with room for targeted discussions. </p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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cosmictraveler

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<p>&nbsp;</p><p><font size="4">A nice model of the Hubble is available ....</font></p><p>http://www.thespacestore.com/huspte1re.html</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>It does not require many words to speak the truth. Chief Joseph</p> </div>
 
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Testing

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<p>EVA Day 1: Camera replacement (WFPC2 out/WFC3 in). </p><p>Please be careful with my hardware! A component of WFC-3 has been in my hands in and out of thermal-vac. I like the idea that each of the instruments now have thier own mirror abberation correction. Best wishes for a sucsessful mission!</p><p>Oh, Welcome to the board.&nbsp; Can you tell us your function in the Mission?</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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earth_bound_misfit

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<p>Thanks for posting this. This is exactly the sort of info I was looking for in the over thread.</p><p>Welcome to the board!</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p> </p><p>----------------------------------------------------------------- </p><p>Wanna see this site looking like the old SDC uplink?</p><p>Go here to see how: <strong>SDC Eye saver </strong>  </p> </div>
 
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earth_bound_misfit

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>EVA Day 1: Camera replacement (WFPC2 out/WFC3 in). Please be careful with my hardware! A component of WFC-3 has been in my hands in and out of thermal-vac. I like the idea that each of the instruments now have thier own mirror abberation correction. Best wishes for a sucsessful mission!Oh, Welcome to the board.&nbsp; Can you tell us your function in the Mission? <br /> Posted by Testing</DIV></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>You guys might've crossed paths before :) </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p> </p><p>----------------------------------------------------------------- </p><p>Wanna see this site looking like the old SDC uplink?</p><p>Go here to see how: <strong>SDC Eye saver </strong>  </p> </div>
 
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Testing

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>&nbsp;You guys might've crossed paths before :) <br />Posted by earth_bound_misfit</DIV></p><p>Nah. I'm too far down the food chain. But it was the only piece of our HW that launched, was recovered, refurbished twice and will launch again.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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SM4_Engineer

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Nah. I'm too far down the food chain. But it was the only piece of our HW that launched, was recovered, refurbished twice and will launch again. <br /> Posted by Testing</DIV></p><p>I'm guessing part of the WF/PC enclosure or the SOFA mechanism.&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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SM4_Engineer

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Oh, Welcome to the board.&nbsp; Can you tell us your function in the Mission? <br /> Posted by Testing</DIV></p><p>I'll be manning the science console in the HST contol center. Hubble is comprised of an observatory (telescope) with a spacecraft (communications, power, attitude control) wrapped around it. Our responsibility is the telescope part. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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Testing

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I'm guessing part of the WF/PC enclosure or the SOFA mechanism.&nbsp; <br />Posted by SM4_Engineer</DIV></p><p>The latter would be an excellent guess.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>"Shuttle flight questions are better served over on the STS-125 thread."Wayne - That is a great flight thread that I have been monitoring but there is little about the servicing of the telescope. I started this thread for those who'd like to focus on the servicing aspects of the mission. I'm a telescope guy and not a shuttle guy (although both are great). This is a huge mission with room for targeted discussions. &nbsp; <br />Posted by SM4_Engineer</DIV><br /><br />Fair enough. While there may be some duplication, I can see your point.</p><p>Wayne</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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bushuser

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<font size="2">I recall the original corrective optics device [COSAR??] was swapped out&nbsp;in place of&nbsp;the original polarimeter experiment.&nbsp; This was to the great chagrin of the investigators who had waited years to fly their polarimeter experiment.&nbsp; Was this done later in the Hubble program, or did they just say "forget about it!"</font>
 
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SM4_Engineer

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I recall the original corrective optics device [COSAR??] was swapped out&nbsp;in place of&nbsp;the original polarimeter experiment.&nbsp; This was to the great chagrin of the investigators who had waited years to fly their polarimeter experiment.&nbsp; Was this done later in the Hubble program, or did they just say "forget about it!" <br /> Posted by bushuser</DIV></p><p>The High Speed Photometer (HSP) was removed to make room for the Corrective Optics Space Telescope Axial Replacement (COSTAR). COSTAR greatly improved Hubble's science capabilities by refocusing the light going into the GHRS, FOS, and FOC instruments. Over the years each of those first generation instruments has also been replaced by much more advanced instrumentation that has been in the works since the late 1980's. Due to the limited capacity to carry new instruments into orbit, the limited time available for astronauts to install them, and only five slots in Hubble it would not have made sense to reinstall a first generation instrument. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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Testing

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>The High Speed Photometer (HSP) was removed to make room for the Corrective Optics Space Telescope Axial Replacement (COSTAR). COSTAR greatly improved Hubble's science capabilities by refocusing the light going into the GHRS, FOS, and FOC instruments. Over the years each of those first generation instruments has also been replaced by much more advanced instrumentation that has been in the works since the late 1980's. Due to the limited capacity to carry new instruments into orbit, the limited time available for astronauts to install them, and only five slots in Hubble it would not have made sense to reinstall a first generation instrument. <br />Posted by SM4_Engineer</DIV></p><p>What can you tell us about the differences between WFPC2 and WFC3? Obviously better, but in what way. CCD's have come a long way in 15 years. I know the filter selection was changed and then changed again. Details if possible.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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Testing

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I'll be manning the science console in the HST contol center. Hubble is comprised of an observatory (telescope) with a spacecraft (communications, power, attitude control) wrapped around it. Our responsibility is the telescope part. <br />Posted by SM4_Engineer</DIV></p><p>Clarification request. I read this that you are on the HST as normal assignment?<br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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SM4_Engineer

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>What can you tell us about the differences between WFPC2 and WFC3? Obviously better, but in what way. CCD's have come a long way in 15 years. I know the filter selection was changed and then changed again. Details if possible. <br /> Posted by Testing</DIV></p><p>http://www.stsci.edu/hst/wfc3</p><p>Here is the WFC3 instrument website at our facility. Clicking the links on the left of the page will provide a wealth of details on detectors, filters, and capabilities. The plot on the first page is a good summary of how the improvements incorporated into WFC3 sum together to produce a superior instrument. You'll see that WFC3 has two lines while (the great) WFPC2 has just one. That is because WFC3 has two channels: a visible/UV and an infrared. Feel free to start with the link then ask questions about what you find there. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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SM4_Engineer

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Clarification request. I read this that you are on the HST as normal assignment? <br /> Posted by Testing</DIV></p><p>Yes. I'm an engineer at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) currently focused on supporting Servicing Mission 4. After that I'll continue general support of the science instruments and the telescope. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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Testing

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>http://www.stsci.edu/hst/wfc3Here is the WFC3 instrument website at our facility. Clicking the links on the left of the page will provide a wealth of details on detectors, filters, and capabilities. The plot on the first page is a good summary of how the improvements incorporated into WFC3 sum together to produce a superior instrument. You'll see that WFC3 has two lines while (the great) WFPC2 has just one. That is because WFC3 has two channels: a visible/UV and an infrared. Feel free to start with the link then ask questions about what you find there. <br />Posted by SM4_Engineer</DIV><br /><br />Information overload here. Thank you for the link. It will take a few Days to skim through that but I will. We have people foaming at the mouth to see SOFA2 on the bench for a post 15 year orbital inspection for condition. Very few pieces come home for a look see. Here is some eye candy from my perspective. 30 seconds after we opened the chamber door. As I said, It's personal. </p><p><br /><img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/15/2/6fd8741f-f6a2-46bf-a2f1-8fcf86bf9c6f.Medium.jpg" alt="" /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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Testing

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Yes. I'm an engineer at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) currently focused on supporting Servicing Mission 4. After that I'll continue general support of the science instruments and the telescope. <br />Posted by SM4_Engineer</DIV></p><p>Happy to have been of service to the Mission. Testing: Test Equipment Engineer. Build, maintain and try to teach thermal-vac space simulation. Test when it's important. Can't wait for first light. A bit beyond my 5" reflector and Canon EOS!</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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monkeyboyjtm

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<p>I understand that this is the last maned servicing mission to the telescope. Does anybody know if&nbsp;NASA is planning on using robots to to service&nbsp;Hubble after the Space Shuttles retirement date? &nbsp;</p>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I understand that this is the last maned servicing mission to the telescope. Does anybody know if&nbsp;NASA is planning on using robots to to service&nbsp;Hubble after the Space Shuttles retirement date? &nbsp; <br />Posted by monkeyboyjtm</DIV><br /><br />Yes we know, the only Hubble mission that might occur in the future is one to attach a deorbit motor so it safely splashes down in the Pacific when it's mission is done.</p><p>There will be no more servicing missions, so what we get from this one is all we will ever get.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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Testing

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I understand that this is the last maned servicing mission to the telescope. Does anybody know if&nbsp;NASA is planning on using robots to to service&nbsp;Hubble after the Space Shuttles retirement date? &nbsp; <br />Posted by monkeyboyjtm</DIV><br /><br />Hubble was never designed for manned seviceing let alone a Robotic mission. There was a study done by Oceaneering for feasability but it did not get very far. I believe it will have application in the future. One of the primary efforts will be to refuel operational satellites that have exceeded planned life and are low on fuel to&nbsp; maintain attitude and orbit. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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bpcooper

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Hubble was never designed for manned seviceing let alone a Robotic mission. </DIV></p><p>&nbsp;Hubble was specifically designed to be serviced by astronauts. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>-Ben</p> </div>
 
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Testing

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>&nbsp;Hubble was specifically designed to be serviced by astronauts. <br />Posted by bpcooper</DIV></p><p>Prior to the discovery of the mirror abberation there was no plan for on orbit servicing of Hubble. Where you commin frum Ben?. NASA says it was never planned. They would never have come up with all the odd procedures and tools were your case true. </p><p>"Major surgery is now required on patient Hubble.&nbsp; For the first time ever, we need to probe the guts inside in order to improve our patient's remaining, productive days.&nbsp; One of those early surgeons, John Grunsfeld, will be returning to Hubble to perform this more invasive surgery. </p><p>The two instruments being cracked open on repair mission 4 are not designed for on-orbit repair.&nbsp; Back in the 1970's and 80's, we just couldn't conceive of astronauts performing even minor internal surgery, so we didn't build in the capability.&nbsp; In the relentless and unforgiving vacuum of space, human beings alone are just not up to the task, so it didn't seem possible. " Colleen Hartman, NASA</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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