Hubble Space Telescope – Servicing Mission 4

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bpcooper

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Prior to the discovery of the mirror abberation there was no plan for on orbit servicing of Hubble. Where you commin frum Ben?. NASA says it was never planned. They would never have come up with all the odd procedures and tools were your case true. <br /> Posted by Testing</DIV></p><p>If you think that, you are incorrect and need to do some research. Go to the Hubble website or google the history of Hubble.</p><p>From its physical origins in the early 1970s, Hubble was to be designed to fit in and be serviced on orbit by the space shuttle and even brought back to earth for servicing and again being relaunched, a plan later abandoned. It was because of this design that, upon discovery of that major flaw, they were able to repair it on orbit as they did. Hubble was specificially designed with major, wholly interchangable parts, not only for repairs but for upgrades. </p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>-Ben</p> </div>
 
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Testing

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>If you think that, you are incorrect and need to do some research. Go to the Hubble website or google the history of Hubble.From its physical origins in the early 1970s, Hubble was to be designed to fit in and be serviced on orbit by the space shuttle and even brought back to earth for servicing and again being relaunched, a plan later abandoned. It was because of this design that, upon discovery of that major flaw, they were able to repair it on orbit as they did. Hubble was specificially designed with major, wholly interchangable parts, not only for repairs but for upgrades. &nbsp; <br />Posted by bpcooper</DIV></p><p>Sorry Ben, the only part we can agree on was original intent to bring it home. Not on orbit servicing. I'll let the experts settle this one. No further comment.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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bpcooper

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Sorry Ben, the only part we can agree on was original intent to bring it home. Not on orbit servicing. I'll let the experts settle this one. No further comment. <br /> Posted by Testing</DIV></p><p>Ok, here. If you argue again I won't bother addressing it. I'm just trying to make sure the facts are correct, not attack anyone:<br /><br />http://hubblesite.org/the_telescope/hubble_essentials/<br /><br />"In 1974, the group working on the project suggested a telescope with a number of interchangeable instruments. The Space Shuttle would be used to put the telescope in orbit and either return it to Earth for repairs and replacement instruments, or service it in space."<br /><br />&nbsp;http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubble/servicing/sm4_announce_feature.html<br /><br />"From the outset, Hubble was designed to be visited and upgraded over the years by NASA astronauts."<br /><br />http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubble/servicing/index.html<br /><br />"The Hubble Space Telescope, orbiting 353 miles (569 km) above the surface of the Earth, was the first telescope designed to be visited in space by astronauts to perform repairs, replace parts, and update its technology with new instruments. With each servicing mission, Hubble's power increases, making it one of the most enduring and successful space missions ever undertaken."<br /><br />http://hubblesite.org/servicing_mission_4/<br /><br />"Hubble was designed to be repaired and upgraded by astronauts"<br /><br />Even Wikipedia (heh):<br /><br />"The Hubble is the only telescope ever designed to be serviced in space by astronauts"<br /><br />http://www.spacetelescope.org/about/general/fact_sheet.html<br /><br />"Hubble was designed to be serviced in space."<br /><br />http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEM106WO4HD_index_0_m.html<br /><br />"HST was designed to be serviced in space, thus also allowing outdated instruments to be replaced. The telescope was placed in a low-Earth orbit by the Space Shuttle (600 kilometre altitude) and uses modular components so that it could be recovered on subsequent Shuttle missions and faulty or outdated parts more easily replaced before being re-released into orbit."<br /><br /><br />And that's just page one of a quick google search. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>-Ben</p> </div>
 
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SM4_Engineer

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Sorry Ben, the only part we can agree on was original intent to bring it home. Not on orbit servicing. I'll let the experts settle this one. No further comment. <br /> Posted by Testing</DIV></p><p>I'm just back from the beach so let me wade into this discussion. The simple answer is: yes, Hubble was 100% built to be regularly serviced on orbit. Several options were considered prior to its construction including periodic returns to earth&nbsp; for refurbishment but the adopted strategy was to make it modular and astronaut friendly. Hubble has Orbital Replacement Units (ORU) throughout its systems that are designed to be easily unbolted/unlatched for quick changeouts. The structure itself is covered in astronaut handholds, Portable Foot Restraint (PFR) sockets, and yes...even doors on all of the equipment bays. The Hubble program had a significant impact on the shuttle payload bay designs. Initially the shuttle was to be built with little in the way of connections to payloads and the early Hubble people did much of the pushing to get communications links, power, and etceteras added to the bay.&nbsp;</p><p>So the way servicing is being done is the way it was planned from day 1.&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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SM4_Engineer

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I understand that this is the last maned servicing mission to the telescope. Does anybody know if&nbsp;NASA is planning on using robots to to service&nbsp;Hubble after the Space Shuttles retirement date? &nbsp; <br /> Posted by monkeyboyjtm</DIV></p><p>There are people in NASA working on robotic servicing plans but I don't believe there are currently any programs being funded specifically toward that goal. During SM4 the crew will attach a Soft Capture Mechanism (SCM) to the back end of the telescope for a robotic docking site. The SCM will be the future attachment point for a deorbit module containing thrusters to bring the spacecraft down in a controlled manner but it could also be used for robotic servicing. Follow the link for some cool pictures:</p><p>http://www.edcheung.com/job/hrsdm/hrsdm.htm</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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Testing

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I'm just back from the beach so let me wade into this discussion. The simple answer is: yes, Hubble was 100% built to be regularly serviced on orbit. Several options were considered prior to its construction including periodic returns to earth&nbsp; for refurbishment but the adopted strategy was to make it modular and astronaut friendly. Hubble has Orbital Replacement Units (ORU) throughout its systems that are designed to be easily unbolted/unlatched for quick changeouts. The structure itself is covered in astronaut handholds, Portable Foot Restraint (PFR) sockets, and yes...even doors on all of the equipment bays. The Hubble program had a significant impact on the shuttle payload bay designs. Initially the shuttle was to be built with little in the way of connections to payloads and the early Hubble people did much of the pushing to get communications links, power, and etceteras added to the bay.&nbsp;So the way servicing is being done is the way it was planned from day 1.&nbsp; <br />Posted by SM4_Engineer</DIV><br /><br />I stand corrected. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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CalliArcale

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Prior to the discovery of the mirror abberation there was no plan for on orbit servicing of Hubble. Where you commin frum Ben?. NASA says it was never planned. They would never have come up with all the odd procedures and tools were your case true. "Major surgery is now required on patient Hubble.&nbsp; For the first time ever, we need to probe the guts inside in order to improve our patient's remaining, productive days.&nbsp; One of those early surgeons, John Grunsfeld, will be returning to Hubble to perform this more invasive surgery. The two instruments being cracked open on repair mission 4 are not designed for on-orbit repair.&nbsp; Back in the 1970's and 80's, we just couldn't conceive of astronauts performing even minor internal surgery, so we didn't build in the capability.&nbsp; In the relentless and unforgiving vacuum of space, human beings alone are just not up to the task, so it didn't seem possible. " Colleen Hartman, NASA <br /> Posted by Testing</DIV></p><p>I realize others have already answered this generally, but more specifically, what those quotes are referring to is the fact that not all of Hubble was intended to be serviced on orbit.&nbsp; Some of its components were originally intended to last the life of the spacecraft, because it was believed to be too complicated and risky to swap them out in orbit.&nbsp; These include the power systems and the main computer.&nbsp; The risk comes from the fact that Hubble would have to be completely powered down in order to replace them, and it was never designed to power up in space.&nbsp; Theoretically, it would work, assuming the astronauts could perform the contortions required to do the actual swaps, but as this was not a design requirement, nobody could be sure.&nbsp; One big question was whether the units (which lacked fittings suitable for manipulation with thick spacesuit gloves, and which were installed in awkward locations) could be swapped out before Hubble froze to death.&nbsp; And as it turned out, the astronauts were able to pull it off, and Hubble powered back up again just fine.</p><p>It was extremely awesome.&nbsp; ;-) </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#666699"><em>"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly . . . timey wimey . . . stuff."</em>  -- The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Posted by CalliArcale</DIV></p><p>Thanx, Calli, you said that very well (as usual). Bottom line, some parts were designed to be swapped out. Many others were not, yet our "team" from engineers to astronauts have managed to do it anyway.</p><p>A&nbsp;solid recommendation for the presence of humans in space exploration. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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<p><font size="2"><strong>I have something to ask in this this very interesting thread, hope it's not too stupid.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>Regarding ACS, (Advanced Camera for Surveys), &nbsp;</strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>How is it to be fixed I assume the fault or the cause of the fault is known?</strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>We really could have done with ACS for the Uranus Equinox / ring plane crossing last September (nearly a year ago now, that's scary), but WFPC2 did do a fine job in observing said Uranian equinox.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>I'm rweally hoping that ACS will be pressed into action ith observing 1 Ceres, 2 Pallas & 4 Vesta as well as search for more moons around Pluto in support for the DAWN & New Horizon missions.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>Andrew Brown.</strong></font>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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centsworth_II

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<p><font color="#333399"><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Regarding ACS, (Advanced Camera for Surveys), &nbsp;How is it to be fixed I assume the fault or the cause of the fault is known?<br /> Posted by 3488</DIV></font></p><p>I hope it works!&nbsp; </p><p>http://acs-repair.gsfc.nasa.gov/index.php</p><p>http://www.stsci.edu/hst/acs/performance/ACSR_status/ACS_repair_cheng.pdf</p><p>Both the above are linked from:&nbsp; http://www.stsci.edu/hst/acs/performance/ACSR_status</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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shuttle_guy

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Prior to the discovery of the mirror abberation there was no plan for on orbit servicing of Hubble. Where you commin frum Ben?. NASA says it was never planned. They would never have come up with all the odd procedures and tools were your case true. "Major surgery is now required on patient Hubble.&nbsp; For the first time ever, we need to probe the guts inside in order to improve our patient's remaining, productive days.&nbsp; One of those early surgeons, John Grunsfeld, will be returning to Hubble to perform this more invasive surgery. The two instruments being cracked open on repair mission 4 are not designed for on-orbit repair.&nbsp; Back in the 1970's and 80's, we just couldn't conceive of astronauts performing even minor internal surgery, so we didn't build in the capability.&nbsp; In the relentless and unforgiving vacuum of space, human beings alone are just not up to the task, so it didn't seem possible. " Colleen Hartman, NASA <br />Posted by Testing</DIV></p><p>The Hubble was designed to be serviced and this was planned before it was launched, however, there are portions that were not designed to be serviced.&nbsp;</p><p><br /><br />&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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shuttle_guy

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<p>We have picked up a problem while performing the mate of the LH2 ET/Orbiter umbilical. Worse case is we have to demate the Orbiter and do repairs in the OPF. That would be a big launch impact. Other options are being evaluated at this time. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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SM4_Engineer

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>We have picked up a problem while performing the mate of the LH2 ET/Orbiter umbilical. Worse case is we have to demate the Orbiter and do repairs in the OPF. That would be a big launch impact. Other options are being evaluated at this time. <br /> Posted by shuttle_guy</DIV></p><p>Thanks for the update. If a slip happens I am sure the Hubble people will find something to do during the wait. <img src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/content/scripts/tinymce/plugins/emotions/images/smiley-wink.gif" border="0" alt="Wink" title="Wink" /> </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p>Just found this interesting. Here are Florida rainfall totals from Fay thru this morning...</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>MELBOURNE/WINDOVER FARMS&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 27.65<br />CAPE CANAVERAL /USAF FIELD MILL 21/&nbsp; 22.83<br />SEBASTIAN /SCRIPPS SPACE COAST/&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 22.25<br />PALM SHORES 1.4 W&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 21.44<br />PALM BAY 1.0 NE&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 21.00<br />VIERA&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 20.75<br />HILLIARD 5.4 NW&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 19.70<br />MELBOURNE WFO&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 19.62<br />CAPE CANAVERAL/COCOA BEACH&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 19.01<br />SANFORD 2 ESE&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 18.27<br />ST MARKS 4 ESE&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 17.67<br />JACKSONVILLE/INTL APT&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 12.07<br />MONTICELLO 3.6 WSW&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 11.90<br />VERO BEACH/MUNI APT&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 11.34<br />WACISSA 1.1 SW&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 10.80<br />DAYTONA BEACH/REGIONAL APT&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 8.99<br />GAINESVILLE/REGIONAL APT&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 8.25<br />NAPLES/MUNICIPAL APT&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 7.96<br />FT LAUDERDALE/HOLLYWOOD&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 7.12<br /><br />M(ology)W</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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bpcooper

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Rollout is off till Tuesday morning earliest now. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>-Ben</p> </div>
 
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3488

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'><font color="#ff0000">Rollout is off till Tuesday morning earliest now. <br /> Posted by bpcooper</font></DIV></p><p><font size="4">Let's hope Tropical Storm Gustav does not track further east.&nbsp;</font></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'><font color="#ff0000">Just found this interesting. Here are Florida rainfall totals from Fay thru this morning...&nbsp;MELBOURNE/WINDOVER FARMS&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 27.65CAPE CANAVERAL /USAF FIELD MILL 21/&nbsp; 22.83SEBASTIAN /SCRIPPS SPACE COAST/&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 22.25PALM SHORES 1.4 W&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 21.44PALM BAY 1.0 NE&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 21.00VIERA&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 20.75HILLIARD 5.4 NW&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 19.70MELBOURNE WFO&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 19.62CAPE CANAVERAL/COCOA BEACH&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 19.01SANFORD 2 ESE&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 18.27ST MARKS 4 ESE&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 17.67JACKSONVILLE/INTL APT&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 12.07MONTICELLO 3.6 WSW&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 11.90VERO BEACH/MUNI APT&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 11.34WACISSA 1.1 SW&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 10.80DAYTONA BEACH/REGIONAL APT&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 8.99GAINESVILLE/REGIONAL APT&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 8.25NAPLES/MUNICIPAL APT&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 7.96FT LAUDERDALE/HOLLYWOOD&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 7.12M(ology)W <br /> Posted by MeteorWayne</font></DIV></p><p><font size="2"><strong>Thanks Wayne, that is very interesting. Looks like Gustav is making its way north, lets hope it does not impact the schedule further for STS 125.</strong></font></p><p><font size="2"><strong>Andrew Brown.&nbsp;</strong></font></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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shuttle_guy

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<p>The roll out to Pad A moving to Tuesday still leaves us with 2 contingency days in the flow leading to a Oct.8th</p><p>launch attempt.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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scottb50

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>The roll out to Pad A moving to Tuesday still leaves us with 2 contingency days in the flow leading to a Oct.8thlaunch attempt. <br /> Posted by shuttle_guy</DIV></p><p>What about the problem you posted yesterday? Was it resolved or can it be fixed at the pad? </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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shuttle_guy

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>What about the problem you posted yesterday? Was it resolved or can it be fixed at the pad? <br />Posted by scottb50</DIV></p><p>We believe that we have a fix to the LH2 ET/Orbiter umbilical&nbsp;mate problem. If all goes well we can perform the fix in the VAB and roll out Tuesday. The fix has not been approved yet.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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shuttle_guy

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>We believe that we have a fix to the LH2 ET/Orbiter umbilical&nbsp;mate problem. If all goes well we can perform the fix in the VAB and roll out Tuesday. The fix has not been approved yet. <br />Posted by shuttle_guy</DIV></p><p>The ET 129 (ET for STS-126 and the STS-125 rescue mission)&nbsp;issue of possible debris in the tank has been cleared. The ET mate to the SRB stack&nbsp;to the will start tomorrow.<br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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SM4_Engineer

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>We believe that we have a fix to the LH2 ET/Orbiter umbilical&nbsp;mate problem. If all goes well we can perform the fix in the VAB and roll out Tuesday. The fix has not been approved yet. <br /> Posted by shuttle_guy</DIV></p><p>I'll be out of contact for a week. With luck and a lot of effort Atlantis will be at the pad the next time I get an update. Everyone up here at Hubble knows the sweat that the shuttle program is putting into this mission and it is greatly appreciated.&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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CalliArcale

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I'll be out of contact for a week. With luck and a lot of effort Atlantis will be at the pad the next time I get an update. Everyone up here at Hubble knows the sweat that the shuttle program is putting into this mission and it is greatly appreciated.&nbsp; <br /> Posted by SM4_Engineer</DIV></p><p>Best of luck to you and your team!&nbsp; You do a magnificent job with this fine instrument, and I know it will be in good hands when Atlantis arrives in October. </p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><font color="#666699"><em>"People assume that time is a strict progression of cause to effect, but actually from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint it's more like a big ball of wibbly wobbly . . . timey wimey . . . stuff."</em>  -- The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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shuttle_guy

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I'll be out of contact for a week. With luck and a lot of effort Atlantis will be at the pad the next time I get an update. Everyone up here at Hubble knows the sweat that the shuttle program is putting into this mission and it is greatly appreciated.&nbsp; <br />Posted by SM4_Engineer</DIV></p><p>The LH2 ET/Orbiter umbilical problem has been resolved. We are back into processing. </p><p>Currently&nbsp;rollout to Pad A is set for a few min after mid night Monday night. However.....................A new strom is predicted to turn directly for KSC to arrive early next week. Rollout may be delayed..........</p><p><br /><br />&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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shuttle_guy

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<p>I forgot to update on the STS-126/rescue mission for STS-125. The ET (ET 129) mate to the SRB stack is in work.</p><p>Orbiter (OV-105) is scheduled to roll to the VAB Sept. 12th &nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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shuttle_guy

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>I forgot to update on the STS-126/rescue mission for STS-125. The ET (ET 129) mate to the SRB stack is in work.Orbiter (OV-105) is scheduled to roll to the VAB Sept. 12th &nbsp; <br />Posted by shuttle_guy</DIV></p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>Due to the lost time from tropical storm Fay and the umbilical problem the program is considering moving the launch target date from Oct. 8th to Oct 11th. This does not include any lost time which may come from Tropical Storm soon to be hurricane Hanna..........<br /></p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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