Feature This week's community question is about wormholes!

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Catastrophe

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Feb 18, 2020
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I am sorry to note that some may treat supposed objects, which might allow subatomic interactions, as if this automatically opened them to macroscopic effects, such as the passage of humans.
Put simply, just because neutrinos might be able to, it doesn't mean humans can.

I see that 'now' even shuttles can pass through the Stargate!

Cat :)
 
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Nov 13, 2020
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I am sorry to note that some may treat supposed objects, which might allow subatomic interactions, as if this automatically opened them to macroscopic effects, such as the passage of humans.
Put simply, just because neutrinos might be able to, it doesn't mean humans can.

I see that 'now' even shuttles can pass through the Stargate!

Cat :)
I think that before starting a discussion like this we would have detected such objects. In absence of evidences they really exist is a waste of time.
 
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Aug 14, 2020
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Hiya, folks :) Here we are with yet another Community Question! This time around...I'm thinking we go ahead and test our imagination even further.

Nearly all space enthusiasts have, at some point, been fascinated by the noble wormhole. Honestly, who wouldn't be? It's a mysterious, spectacular phenomena that has frequently tested the limits of astrophysics. So, I want to know, if it was possible to pass through a wormhole safely and you were given the opportunity to do so...what would you expect to see on the other side?

I'm embarrassed to say that there's a part of my brain that insists I'd find myself in the same universe, but hundreds of years in the past. It seems the cartoons I saw as a child (and one Physics teacher who tolerated my incessant questions) have allowed that idea to stick to my brain!

How about you? What would you expect to see on the other side of a wormhole?

And remember, we'll be featuring some of our favourite answers on the weekly community round-up!
An Einsteinian observation is the one about a ping pong bouncing on a table in the carriage room on a train speeding by a person standing still on Earth next to the road bed. The ping pong ball is bouncing straight up and down to the person bouncing it on the train. It is bouncing in a curve forward in the direction of the trains travel to the observer who is standing still by the railroad bed. Both observers believe themselves themselves to be standing still observing the ping pong bouncing. But the Earth isn't standing still. Neither is the solar system of our Sol. Neither is the Milky Way galaxy. And neither is our local universe that appears to be accelerating in expansion (aka inflation) of its space, therefore, supposedly, its time between objects. Now I call that last as being due to our own local locale being in deceleration in velocity due to being inside a very large gravity well, and going deeper inside all the time on the way to an infinite. But I won't go into that, here, except to say that the "expansion" (the "inflation") of space should not be considered always just a one way street.

Because light tells us Alpha Centauri is about 4.3 light years distant from us, does that figure pre-suppose the space between to be absolute rather than tractably expansive and contractive (bubble-like inflationary and deflationary). Could any distant point be much, much, closer to the Earth than light makes it seem? Than light measures it? Or, contrarily, much further away?

Contractively -- space-wise, and time-wise -- much, much, much, much, closer. To or for who? How?

Oh, sorry. I left my beginning with the ping pong ball bouncing hanging. What would that ping pong ball bounce -- on Earth -- be to a traveler accelerating vastly in velocity, relative to its bounce and the observers' stands, in space? Alternatively, to a traveler decelerating vastly in velocity, relative to its bounce and the observers' stands, in space? In the former case would the traveler be ascending out of a hole faster and ever faster? In the latter case would the traveler be descending into a hole whether faster or slower? One thing I'd be pretty sure of, that ping pong ball would not look to be bouncing straight up and down for either traveler accelerating in the difference(!), in differing directions of velocity, between their velocities, the former accelerating in the contraction of space, therefore time between spaces; the other accelerating in the expansion of space, therefore time between spaces.
 
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Aug 14, 2020
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The idea of traveling so fast in space as to travel backward in time has been brought up (travel ahead in space and time (+) rather than that travel behind one's self (-) which is also done, and done at exactly the same time and to exactly the same degree. This is the actual reality of traveling backward in time, turning around while traveling forward in space (thus up (+) through time) and watching the universe there disappear ever farther into histories (-). If you could travel far enough, fast enough in life, you could watch the Milky Way disappear -- toward the Big Bang horizon -- into its [once upon a time] component parts).

Superman stands on the moon and observes through his super telescopic vision a piano falling out an upper story window on Earth just about to crash land on a cat down on the sidewalk of the street. It is just an instant from the crash landing. He instantly, repeat -- instantly (he instantaneously), teleports to the scene to save the cat. He arrives. The piano is on the side walk. The cat is dead. Why? What happened?

Superman was behind the times when he observed the scene with his super telescopic vision from the moon. He crossed the space in instantaneous time (one could say [infinitely] fast, or maybe he traveled through a wormhole, or both). He did not cross the time instantaneously because he was already behind times and thus, already too late to save the cat when he started. All he did was fast forward and catch up in time to the particular space on Earth.

Superman, and light itself, at any distance whatsoever, aren't the only ones always behind the times (finitely: From ever so slightly behind the times to as much as 14 billion years or so behind the times. Infinitely: Into "forever behind the times").
 
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