ASTEROID 2007 TU24 GETTING CLOSER

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MeteorWayne

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Oh and BTW, during the next two weeks, the asteroid is perfectly positioned for observation. It is away from the sun and less than 0.1 AU until Feb 17<br /><br />That means that by the time it moves far enough away that we can't reliable detect it, the post encounter orbit will likely be very tightly constrained.<br /><br />This current encounter is not a concern for us, so....<br /><br />For the 2046 encounter, from NEODys:<br /><br />Nominal closest approach: 0.0177457 <br />Minimum closest approach: 0.0059538 <br /><br />Edited to add details about the observation period. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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Pooua

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Why do you people post a distance in the form of "0.0005 AU," instead of "70,000 km"? Normally in science, a whole number is preferred over a long decimal.
 
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MeteorWayne

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Because that is how the closest approach is calculated.<br /><br />The conversion to km is posted earlier in this thread.<br /><br />The closest approach os .0037 AU= ~554,000 km <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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pirated

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yeah but, how many inches is that....<br /><br />hehe, just kidding..<br /><br />everyone knows is 21 billion, eight hundred fifty-nine million, 200 thousand inches.<br /><br />at least from my house. <img src="/images/icons/tongue.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>Peace. </p><p><font color="#33cccc">-------------------------------------------------------------------</font> <strong><font color="#993300">I'm a Rock!</font></strong></p><p><font color="#33cccc">Little Johnny was a scientist. Little Johnny is no more. For what he thought was H2O was H2SO4.</font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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It's 403,552,144 goad or 2,214,048,486,226 kyu <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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The obs are rolling in now!<br />From JPL<br /><br /> # obs. used (total) 155 <br /> # delay obs. used 0 <br /> # Doppler obs. used 2 <br /> data-arc span 108 days <br /> first obs. used 2007-10-11 <br /> last obs. used 2008-01-27 <br /> planetary ephem. DE405 <br /> SB-pert. ephem. SB405-CPV-2 <br /> quality code 2 <br /> fit RMS .38499 <br /> data source ORB <br /> producer OSOD/JPL <br /> solution date 2008-Jan-27 00:56:08 <br /> <br /> Earth MOID = .00125067 AU <br /><br />e= .5289950135052194 **3.1281e-07 <br />a =2.009691742342679 **1.3541e-06 AU <br />q =.9465748319607854 **4.4727e-08 AU <br />i =5.801593759795334 **8.8392e-06 deg <br />node =127.1793819299534** 1.7007e-05 deg <br />peri =333.5938903934868 **1.3615e-05 deg <br />M =265.6257246717049 **9.8274e-05 deg <br />tp =2454473.299599245413<br />(2008-Jan-07.79959925) 2.2566e-05 JED <br />period =1040.621031385067**0.0010517 d<br />period=2.85 **2.879e-06 Yr<br /> n .3459472652795034 3.4963e-07 deg/d <br />Q 3.072808652724571 2.0704e-06 AU<br /><br />Closest approach .0037 AU<br /><br /><br />From NEODys<br /><br />Nom CA =0.0037042 MIN CA=0.0037041 AU<br /><br />RMS of residuals (arcsec) 4.53968E-01 <br />Date of first obs. (yr/mo/day) 2007/10/11.26838 <br />Date of last obs. (yr/mo/day) 2008/01/27.03468 <br />Number of Observations 154 <br />Number Discarded 1 <br />Radar Astrometry <br />Date of first obs. (yr/mo/day) 2008/01/23 <br />Date of last obs. (yr/mo/day) 2008/01/23 <br />Number of Observations 2 <br />Delay observations 0 <br />Discarded delay 0 <br />Doppler observations 2 <br />Discarded Doppler 0 <br />Arc Information <br />Arc length (days) 108 <br />Days unobserved 1 <br /><br />a (AU) 2.00997 1.37e-06 <br />eccentricity 0.529067 3.161e-07 <br />inclination (deg) 5.801 8.821e-06 <br />Asc. node (deg) 127.178 1.786e-05 <br />Arg. perih. (deg) 333.589 1.348e-05 <br />M (deg) 334.826 2.963e-05 <br /><br /><br />Other useful data: <b></b> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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Hi MeteorWayne,<br /><br />I thought that I would share this. This article is a great rebuttal. Dunno whether to <br />laugh or cry. Apparently some woo woos claim that 2007 TU24 is gonna clobber us & <br />we're ALL DOOMED, DOOMED. <img src="/images/icons/laugh.gif" /> <img src="/images/icons/crazy.gif" /> <img src="/images/icons/mad.gif" /><br /><br />Thanks for your updates on the orbital elements & the miss distance refinements.<br /><br />I hope we get some really good science out of this. Spectral type, rotation, higher <br />resolution radar images, etc.<br /><br />I also take my hat off to Adrenallyn for attempting to image this tiny, fast moving asteroid.<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Several folks at the NJAA will also be imaging it. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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Good afternoon MeteorWayne,<br /><br />Great stuff MeteorWayne, I will checking the NJAA website for updates. <br /><br />Are you participating yourself?<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Thanx Andrew, always fun to start off Sunday morning with a chuckle.<br /><br />What a bunch of wackos, as Phil says dommsayers are the lowest form of life.<br /><br /><img src="/images/icons/laugh.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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I am meeting with them this afternoon with the Ephemeris and maps with the positions plotted to help them plan the observations.<br /><br />I leave the imaging to the experts <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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Well done,<br /><br />Say hi to them for me please <img src="/images/icons/laugh.gif" /> .<br /><br />I will be regularly checking the website. Some really good science will come from this.<br /><br />I assume that 2007 TU24 was once a main belt asteroid that got kicked out by Jupiter's<br />gravity & or impacts?<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Just a reminder, asteroid 2007 TU24 should be visible in very large binoculars or medium telescopes tonight.<br /><br />For the east coast of the US it will be moving from Cetus toward Pisces.<br />At my latitude (41 N) it sets by about 11PM.<br /><br />At 7PM, the magnitude should be about +14.4, by 11PM +14.0<br />By 11PM on the west coast it will be Mag +13.8<br /><br />It reaches Mag +12 by 2100 UT, +11 by 0600 UT tomorrow.<br /><br />MW<br /><br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Just for fun, a 10 meter asteroid could impact earth around 1609 UT on October 11th this year.<br />A nice fireball perhaps.<br /><br />Asteroid 2003 UM3 has a minimum close approach distance of zero acording to NEODys.<br /><br />Nominal approach distance is 0.186808 AU though, which is<br />27,946,079 km, or 17,364,888 miles, or<br />1,197,689,101,219 dong or<br />6,626,191,442,104 em or<br />15,281,101,830 fathoms.<br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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cyclonebuster

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Why do they tell us 0333 am est on the 29th it will be closest when JPL has it closer to 1200 noon on the 29th when you run the orbit program. At 0330 it is supposed to be .0042 AU from Earth but at 1200 noon the orbit program has it at .0038 AU from Earth. Why the huge 9 hour difference in Close Approach? <br /><br />http://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/sbdb.cgi?sstr=2007%20TU24;orb=1<br /><br /><br /><br />Asteroid To Make Rare Close Flyby Of Earth January 29<br />ScienceDaily (Jan. 25, 2008) — Scientists are monitoring the orbit of asteroid 2007 TU24. The asteroid, believed to be between 150 meters (500 feet) and 610 meters (2,000 feet) in size, is expected to fly past Earth on Jan. 29, with its closest distance being about 537,500 kilometers (334,000 miles) at 12:33 a.m. Pacific time (3:33 a.m. Eastern time). It should be observable that night by amateur astronomers with modest-sized telescopes.<br /> http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071221162707.htm
 
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MeteorWayne

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I see closest approach<br /><br />2008-Jan-29 08:30.. m ..02 53 52.60 ..+59 17 33.3 10.76 ...003692629112640 AU<br /><br />From the Horizons program ~0830 UT (I only used 15 minute intervals)<br />That time is in UT which equals 3:30 AM EST<br />that's ~ 1230 AM PST<br /><br />It's at it's <i> brightest</i> at 1600 UT, or 11 AM EST. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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Hi MeteorWayne,<br /><br />The brightest time difference is due to the fact 2007 TU24 will be more fully sunlit<br />despite being slightly further away, where as at closest approach the phase angle is still <br />fairly high. Am I correct?<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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BTW I noticed a significant change in today's update.<br /><br />The Absolute magnitude ("H") dimmed from +20.184 to +20.4.<br />So new data has shown it as dimmer (hence most likely smaller)<br /><br />This reduced the peak magnitude from +10.25 to +10.47 <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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That is correct.<br />How's your sky look tonight and the next two nights, Andrew? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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That's very interesting.<br /><br />I wonder if the asteroid is a bright type S (silicate) type, hence its smaller than expected size????<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Unfortunately we won't know that unless we visit I guess <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /><br />Although, perhaps someone is doing spectral analysis. <br />Maybe Hubble can do that at the director's discretion. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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3488

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Hi MeteorWayne,<br /><br />High thin cirrus cloud tonight. Can see first & second magnitude stars & Mars.<br /><br />Tommorow night cloudy with rain. <img src="/images/icons/frown.gif" /><br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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adrenalynn

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I've been playing with building and calibrating a prism for spectral analysis. I had hoped to poke at it again for this target. Does great with stars, I need something worthwhile though. I hadn't finished it in time for the Nova in Puppis. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>.</p><p><font size="3">bipartisan</font>  (<span style="color:blue" class="pointer"><span class="pron"><font face="Lucida Sans Unicode" size="2">bī-pär'tĭ-zən, -sən</font></span></span>) [Adj.]  Maintaining the ability to blame republications when your stimulus plan proves to be a devastating failure.</p><p><strong><font color="#ff0000"><font color="#ff0000">IMPE</font><font color="#c0c0c0">ACH</font> <font color="#0000ff"><font color="#c0c0c0">O</font>BAMA</font>!</font></strong></p> </div>
 
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MeteorWayne

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Pretty dim object, but what the heck. It would be great to get some data!! <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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adrenalynn

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Agreed on both counts. It's all about the experiment to me. If the data stinks, the data stinks and it's back to the whiteboard for me. If it doesn't stink, it doesn't stink, and it's back to the whiteboard for me to improve it anyway. <img src="/images/icons/wink.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p>.</p><p><font size="3">bipartisan</font>  (<span style="color:blue" class="pointer"><span class="pron"><font face="Lucida Sans Unicode" size="2">bī-pär'tĭ-zən, -sən</font></span></span>) [Adj.]  Maintaining the ability to blame republications when your stimulus plan proves to be a devastating failure.</p><p><strong><font color="#ff0000"><font color="#ff0000">IMPE</font><font color="#c0c0c0">ACH</font> <font color="#0000ff"><font color="#c0c0c0">O</font>BAMA</font>!</font></strong></p> </div>
 
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