Can black holes eat time?

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The_Science_Kid

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Black Holes is known for eating everything with its amazing gravity (Even Light !).<br />the 4 dimensions is 3 of space and 1 of time.<br />Can black Holes eat time ? so time dont pass inside the horizon of a black hole ? if it cant eat time then black holes dont seem to can eat everything right ?
 
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SHU

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Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Black Holes is known for eating everything with its amazing gravity (Even Light !).the 4 dimensions is 3 of space and 1 of time.Can black Holes eat time ? so time dont pass inside the horizon of a black hole ? if it cant eat time then black holes dont seem to can eat everything right ? <br />Posted by The_Science_Kid</DIV><br /><br /><font size="2">Black holes are an extreme curvature in spacetime, at least outside the horizon.&nbsp; Does that satisfy your term of "eat"?&nbsp; </font>
 
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weeman

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Black holes are an extreme curvature in spacetime, at least outside the horizon.&nbsp; Does that satisfy your term of "eat"?&nbsp; <br />Posted by SHU</DIV><br /><br />It's not so much that black holes eat light, but rather once a photon crosses the event horizon it can't escape, because the black hole's escape velocity is equal to the speed of light. Based on Einstein's theory of&nbsp;time dilation, strong gravitational fields slow&nbsp;down time, from an outsider's point of view. This phenomenon becomes apparent when you understand frame of reference. </p><p>For example, if we&nbsp;could&nbsp;hypothetically see someone fall into the event horizon, we would see&nbsp;time stop for them, so it may appear that the black hole is&nbsp;eating time altogether. However, we can't actually see to the event horizon of a black hole, not yet&nbsp;anyways. Actually seeing objects and light cross into the&nbsp;event horizon is the eventual jackpot for all astronomers and cosmologists! </p><p>The key idea to keep in mind is that once inside the event horizon, the roles of space and time are switched. I'll explain this: In normal 4D space (like we live in here&nbsp;on Earth), time is&nbsp;constantly moving forward, we&nbsp;have no way of stopping it from happening. Additionally,&nbsp;space is not dictated by any one motion, we can move freely through 3 dimensions without being dictated by any one direction, unlike time. However, once you cross&nbsp;beyond the event horizon of a black hole, your direction through time ceases, yet&nbsp;your direction through space is inevitable, you can in&nbsp;no way stop yourself from being pulled to the gravitational singularity. &nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><strong><font color="#ff0000">Techies: We do it in the dark. </font></strong></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>"Put your hand on a stove for a minute and it seems like an hour. Sit with that special girl for an hour and it seems like a minute. That's relativity.</strong><strong>" -Albert Einstein </strong></font></p> </div>
 
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dryson

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Black Holes is known for eating everything with its amazing gravity (Even Light !).the 4 dimensions is 3 of space and 1 of time.Can black Holes eat time ? so time dont pass inside the horizon of a black hole ? if it cant eat time then black holes dont seem to can eat everything right ? <br />Posted by The_Science_Kid</DIV><br /><br />Sure blackholes can eat time. First we have determined that time is this: Time is the measurable distance an energetic body, this meaning an object that is comprised of atoms that vibrate within or at&nbsp;a certain frequency modulation to form&nbsp;solid, gaseous and or fluidic objects or a&nbsp;combination of these three mediums, travels based upon the object's atoms, the object's atoms rate of vibration frequency, the medium in which the object is placed, the interaction of the object's atoms with the medium,&nbsp; the medium's atomic rate of vibration frequency and the interaction of the medium back upon the object and the object's atoms&nbsp;vibration frequency.</p><p>This can be shown by taking an ice cube, who's atomic rate of vibration is very slow thus causing a solid cube of H2O,and placing a bunsen burner underneath it. Immediately &nbsp;the rate of the H20 's atomic vibration frequency is effected at the electron, neutron and proton levels. The introduction of the Bunsen Burner forces the changes in the atomic structure to the point of the electrons, neutrons and protons speeding up thus causing kintec energy to be exerted back which causes the atomic structure of the frozen ice cube to turn to water. The atoms that are excited the most are seen as the frost coming off of the cube, while the less excited atoms are seen as the dripping water, with the remaining atoms that have not kinectically heated up remaining as a solid form of H2O.</p><p>take a flattend ballon that is your object in space,&nbsp;your right hand as the center of the blackhole and your left hand as the insertion point of your spacecraft into the blackhole. as you pull with your right hand which is the gravity well of the black hole keep your left hand as stationary as possible. As you pull the balloon with your right hand&nbsp;the balloon&nbsp;begins to stretch (insert my theorum for why). You should notice that at about the middle distance of travel will be the most distance that the balloon is pulled with the least effort on your part. As you reach your peak pulling strength and without moving your left hand you will feel the pull of the right exerted through the balloon to your left.</p><p>&nbsp;When both the pulling force and the stationary force begin to exert upon one another&nbsp;,this is the point&nbsp; where the breakdown of time occurs. Which ever force is&nbsp;has a greater effect&nbsp;upon the other will either cause the balloon to tear in half, snap out of your right hand excelerating back to the left or snapping from the left hand and excelerating back to the right hand.</p><p>&nbsp;It would be interesting to see what would happen when two blackholes of the same pull interact with one another.</p><p>&nbsp;In theory they would cause a constant push pull on each other trading energy with each other.&nbsp; The middle point of which may be a way to 'springboard' across a galaxy. </p><p>So yes a blackhole can 'eat' time as you mention.</p>
 
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DrRocket

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Sure blackholes can eat time. First we have determined that time is this: Time is the measurable distance an energetic body, this meaning an object that is comprised of atoms that vibrate within or at&nbsp;a certain frequency modulation to form&nbsp;solid, gaseous and or fluidic objects or a&nbsp;combination of these three mediums, travels based upon the object's atoms, the object's atoms rate of vibration frequency, the medium in which the object is placed, the interaction of the object's atoms with the medium,&nbsp; the medium's atomic rate of vibration frequency and the interaction of the medium back upon the object and the object's atoms&nbsp;vibration frequency.</DIV></p><p>This paragraph makes no sense.&nbsp; It has nothing to do with measurement of time.&nbsp; It is just a waste of time.</p><p>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>This can be shown by taking an ice cube, who's atomic rate of vibration is very slow thus causing a solid cube of H2O,and placing a bunsen burner underneath it. Immediately &nbsp;the rate of the H20 's atomic vibration frequency is effected at the electron, neutron and proton levels. The introduction of the Bunsen Burner forces the changes in the atomic structure to the point of the electrons, neutrons and protons speeding up thus causing kintec energy to be exerted back which causes the atomic structure of the frozen ice cube to turn to water. The atoms that are excited the most are seen as the frost coming off of the cube, while the less excited atoms are seen as the dripping water, with the remaining atoms that have not kinectically heated up remaining as a solid form of H2O.</DIV></p><p>This is a somewhat distorted explanation of the phase transition that occurs when ice melts.&nbsp; However, it has little to do with the nuclear particles, and the effect is primarily at the molecular and not the atomic level, It has nothing whatever to do with time or black holes.&nbsp; </p><p>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>take a flattend ballon that is your object in space,&nbsp;your right hand as the center of the blackhole and your left hand as the insertion point of your spacecraft into the blackhole. as you pull with your right hand which is the gravity well of the black hole keep your left hand as stationary as possible. As you pull the balloon with your right hand&nbsp;the balloon&nbsp;begins to stretch (insert my theorum for why). You should notice that at about the middle distance of travel will be the most distance that the balloon is pulled with the least effort on your part. As you reach your peak pulling strength and without moving your left hand you will feel the pull of the right exerted through the balloon to your left.&nbsp;At this point is where the breakdown of time occurs.</DIV></p><p>Gibberish.&nbsp; This is just nonsense.&nbsp; The inference regarding time is plain silly.</p><p>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>When both the pulling force and the stationary force begin to exerted upon one another. Which ever force is greater upon the other will either cause the balloon to tear in half, snapped out of your right hand excerating back to the left or snapping from the left hand and excelerating back to the right hand.&nbsp;It would be interesting to see what would happen when two blackholes of the same pull interact with one another.&nbsp;In theory they would cause a constant push pull on each other trading energy with each other.&nbsp; The middle point of which may be a way to 'springboard' across a galaxy. So yes a blackhole can 'eat' time as you mention.</DIV> <br />Posted by dryson</DIV></p><p>If two black holes of the same pull interact with one another you get either&nbsp; a system of two black holes orbiting the center of mass of the two or you get two black holes colliding and forming a single larger black hole.</p><p>The rest of the paragraph is nonsense talk.</p><span style="font-family:'Arial','sans-serif'"><font size="3">"That's not right. It's not even wrong."<span class="body1"><span style="line-height:115%;font-family:'Arial','sans-serif'">-- Wolfgang Pauli</span></span></font></span> <p><br /><br />&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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