Does Antimatter=Antiuniverse?

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kyle_baron

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I did a Wikipedia search on Antimatter. It's basically the same particle (electron-positron) with an opposite charge, and it reacts to gravity. Therefore, can we logically assume that there's an anti-universe within our universe? This would convince me of the extra dimensions in string theory, or even multi-universes (at least 2, ours and an anti-universe). Anyone else agree or disagree? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font size="4"><strong></strong></font></p> </div>
 
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newtonian

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kyle_baron - I don't understand how you connect the existence of antimatter with the existence of other dimensions - antimatter exists within our 3-d universe observed portion:<br /><br />Plume of Antimatter Discovered<br /><br />Astrophysicists recently discovered what appears to be a 3,500-light-year-long plume of antimatter streaming out of the core of our galaxy, the Milky Way, reports The New York Times. Antimatter consists of atomic particles that are exactly like normal matter except that they have opposite electrical charges. Contact with particles of ordinary matter results in mutual annihilation and releases powerful gamma rays having a specific energy. Scientists identified the plume as antimatter by tuning the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory satellite to that energy level. As for the effect of the plume, “the astrophysicists said it did not threaten Earth, just their image of the galaxy.” - "Awake!," 10/22/97, p. 29.<br /><br />The signature of antimatter-matter annihilation (the plume is also called an annihilation plume) is a specific gamma ray spectrum emission which is what Compton observed.<br /><br />Big bang theory coupled with particle physics observations indicate that both antimatter and matter were created at the origin of our universe, but matter won out slightly due to the fine tuned properties and laws of our universe.<br /><br />I am open-minded as to the existence of other dimensions both within and beyond our universe - as well as to the collision of branes (involving intersecting of dimensions) model for the origin of our universe.<br /><br />I am not certain which model is accurate - or if different models are partly accurate and partly inaccurate.<br /><br />I am certain it is complex and we have much to learn.<br /><br />I agree there are multi-universes - not just because of reasons which astrophysicists cite, but also because I believe in the Bible, e.g.:<br /><br />(1 Kings 8:27) 27 “But will God truly dwell upon the earth? Look! The heavens, yes, th
 
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kyle_baron

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Thankyou Newtonian, for your very thorough answer, along with the religious interpretation. However, I have a few comments, and questions.<br /><br />kyle_baron - I don't understand how you connect the existence of antimatter with the existence of other dimensions - antimatter exists within our 3-d universe observed portion: <br /><br />Plume of Antimatter Discovered <br /><br />Astrophysicists recently discovered what appears to be a 3,500-light-year-long plume of antimatter streaming out of the core of our galaxy, the Milky Way, reports The New York Times. Antimatter consists of atomic particles that are exactly like normal matter except that they have opposite electrical charges. Contact with particles of ordinary matter results in mutual annihilation and releases powerful gamma rays having a specific energy. Scientists identified the plume as antimatter by tuning the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory satellite to that energy level. As for the effect of the plume, “the astrophysicists said it did not threaten Earth, just their image of the galaxy.” - "Awake!," 10/22/97, p. 29. <br /><br />The signature of antimatter-matter annihilation (the plume is also called an annihilation plume) is a specific gamma ray spectrum emission which is what Compton observed<br /><br />It doesn't stay antimatter for very long. The plume is the Gamma Ray remanent of the paired particles annihilation. So maybe, the blackhole at the center of our galaxy acts like a giant accelerator and smashes matter together to produce antimatter, which is spewed out. And, is subsequently annihiliated when it meets normal matter (probably gas) as it exits the core of the galaxy? Would this be an accurate interpretation of that article? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font size="4"><strong></strong></font></p> </div>
 
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bobw

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I think it is pointless to try to find significant meaning in an article from a religious magazine. Better to read the scientific paper that the magazine is supposedly interpreting.<br /><br />I haven't read anything that suggests to me that there is an antimatter universe in our universe. The way I understand it is that when matter condensed after the big bang there was a very slight preference for matter, but antimatter and matter were produced in almost equal quantities. What we see, now, in the visible universe is what is left over after the annihilation of the antimatter. If the universe is uniform then antimatter should be pretty rare. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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alokmohan

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Antimatter has been produced in CERN.But in very small amount.Moreover to have too much antimatter is risky.It may react with the matter and destroy and we bemome gamma ray.
 
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bobw

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CERN is pretty cool. They keep the antimatter in storage rings and use it in collisions. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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