Galaxy Evolution

Dec 27, 2022
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The following paper, published in 2011, proposes a modification to Newton's original gravitational theory that successfully accounts for the discrepancy between the observed rate of periastron advance in the detached eclipsing binary star systems DI Herculis and V541 Cygni and the values theoretically predicted from the combined classical and general relativistic effects:


What I would like to know is if someone on this board knows of a simulation program for galaxy evolution that is currently in use at any college or university that could easily incorporate the potential function/force law proposed in this paper into the simulation program to determine the resulting galaxy evolution without invoking any contributions from theoretical dark matter halos? Matin Wen-Yu Lo did something very similar in 2013, and you can read about it here:


I would like to utilize the modified gravitational theory from the 2011 paper in a similar manner. Any suggestions on what college/university programs to contact or the appropriate graduate students in those programs who could be in a position to actually evaluate the impact of this proposed gravitational potential/force law in this manner? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Maui
 
You might try MOND (Modified Newtonian Dynamics) searches.

Tweaking Newtonian equations works to reduce the need for DM, but it never was able to eliminate it, AFAIK.

I also don’t know how to explain things such as the study of the Bullet Cluster, which shows a separation of matter and DM, apparently.
 
Dec 27, 2022
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Thanks for your reply, but I'm not interested in going down that path. I'd just like to identify a college or university department that has a working computer simulation already written and debugged that is up and running. The only change that would have to be made is implementing the force law from the 2011 paper, and then running the simulation to determine the outcome.
 
Nov 19, 2021
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Academics don't generally deal with the public. They rely on diplomas to insure themselves that you know what you are talking about. Lacking one of them they really aren't interested.
 
Dec 27, 2022
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Correct. I have a Ph.D. in Materials Science and taught engineering at Syracuse University for about a decade. I wrote the 2011 paper that I referenced above.
 
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Dec 29, 2022
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How can you be sure that the observed and measured separation, is the true separation? An un-observed and an un-measured Z displacement could be taking place. Both the observation and the measurement could be deceiving.
 
Dec 27, 2022
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Unclear, thanks for providing the link. No, I had not heard of that paper. I'll take a look.

Classical, you said "An un-observed and an un-measured Z displacement could be taking place." What precisely are you referring to as a "Z displacement" regarding the paper I referenced? What are you calling the Z direction?
 
Dec 29, 2022
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Let's say we are watching a golf ball at 1000 yds. with binoculars. We can easily see the horizontal and vertical motion. But it's hard to see if the ball moves incident or normal to you. And even harder to measure. Observation and measurement is relative to angle of observation. If you look square on at a ring...and then tilt the ring, it becomes an ellipse....to look at and measure.....but it is still a ring.

Edit: If we rotate the ring at constant velocity and measure same.....then tilt....now we see and measure a changing velocity.
 
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Dec 27, 2022
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It sounds like you are questioning the accuracy of the distances measured among the binary star systems DI Herculis and V541 Cygni. Is that correct? Both of these binary systems have very high orbital inclinations, so it is like viewing the elliptical motion from the side. DI Herculis consists of two main-sequence B stars (B4 V and B5 V) moving in a highly eccentric orbit (e = 0.489). This system has a high orbital inclination (i = 89.3◦) and small fractional radii of the stars (R1/a = 0.0621 and R2/a = 0.0574), and produces very deep and narrow eclipses. This allows accurate timings of minimum light, which permits very accurate apsidal motion studies to be conducted.
V541 Cygni consists of a pair of detached B9.5 V stars moving in a highly eccentric orbit (e = 0.479) with an even higher orbital inclination (i = 89.9◦).
 
Dec 29, 2022
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No, I was referring to a rotational dynamic, and how it measures differently with the angle of measurement.

The measurements change, but the motion remains the same and constant.

This concept appears to confuse many people.
 

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