Ariane 5 ES-L528 - ATV cargo (Jules Verne) -

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bobble_bob

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>Disappeared into the clouds after about 15 seconds. <br />Posted by bobw</DIV></p><p>Yeah was dissapointing we only got a short glimpse of it</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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3488

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<p>Updates from Spaceflightnow.com.</p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0413 GMT (11:13 p.m. EST Sat.)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Plus+10 minutes, 30 seconds. Altitude is 143 km, velocity is 7.11 km/sec. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0412 GMT (11:12 p.m. EST Sat.)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Plus+9 minutes, 10 seconds. The upper stage of Ariane 5 rocket -- the storable propellant stage -- has ignited for the first of its two burns required to place the ATV spacecraft into the intended orbit tonight. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0412 GMT (11:12 p.m. EST Sat.)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Plus+9 minutes. The main cryogenic stage's Vulcain engine has cut off. The spent stage has separated for its fall back into the atmosphere over the Atlantic Ocean to burn up, impacting off the Iberian Peninsula. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0411 GMT (11:11 p.m. EST Sat.)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Plus+8 minutes. Coming up on main stage shutdown in about one minute. Altitude is 130 km, velocity is 5.8 km/sec. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0410 GMT (11:09 p.m. EST Sat.)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Plus+7 minutes. Altitude is 135 km, velocity is 4.79 km/sec. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0409 GMT (11:09 p.m. EST Sat.)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Plus+6 minutes. Altitude is 138 km, velocity is 4 km/sec. The rocket is flying through the portion of launch in which its trajectory levels out in order to gain speed. </p><p>Andrew Brown.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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JonClarke

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<p>Downrange tracking ship aquired signal.&nbsp; </p><p>First stage burn successfully complete.</p><p>Second stage ignition successful.</p><p>Nice shot of first stage dropping away (not sure whether it is from this mission or from a previous one)</p><p>Everything still on track.</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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3488

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'><font color="#ff0000">Downrange tracking ship aquired signal.&nbsp; First stage burn successfully complete.Second stage ignition successful.Nice shot of first stage dropping away (not sure whether it is from this mission or from a previous one)Everything still on track.&nbsp; <br />Posted by jonclarke</font></DIV></p><p>That was a nice shot, but like yourself dunno if it was this one.</p><p>Updates from Spaceflightnow.com.</p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0420 GMT (11:20 p.m. EST Sat.)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Plus+17 minutes, 14 seconds. Shutdown 1. The upper stage's Aestus engine has completed its first firing of the night, shutting down after reaching a preliminary parking orbit. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0419 GMT (11:19 p.m. EST Sat.)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Plus+16 minutes, 30 seconds. Altitude is 146.2 km, velocity is 7.5 km/sec. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0418 GMT (11:18 p.m. EST Sat.)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Plus+15 minutes, 30 seconds. Altitude is 146.6 km, velocity is 7.45 km/sec. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0417 GMT (11:17 p.m. EST Sat.)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Plus+14 minutes, 30 seconds. Altitude is 147 km, velocity is 7.38 km/sec. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0417 GMT (11:17 p.m. EST Sat.)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Plus+14 minutes. The burn continues in progress. The upper stage headed for a 260 by 137 km parking orbit where it will coast for 45 minutes until the Aestus engine reignites to circularize the orbit for deployment of the ATV. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0415 GMT (11:15 p.m. EST Sat.)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Plus+12 minutes, 30 seconds. Altitude is 148 km, velocity is 7.24 km/sec. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0414 GMT (11:14 p.m. EST Sat.)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Plus+11 minutes, 30 seconds. About six minutes remaining in this burn. The upper stage's Aestus engine is consuming hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide storable propellants to continue the push toward orbit. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0413 GMT (11:13 p.m. EST Sat.)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Plus+10 minutes, 30 seconds. Altitude is 143 km, velocity is 7.11 km/sec. </p><p>Andrew Brown.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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JonClarke

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<p>First 2nd stage burn complete.</p><p>45 minutes of ballistic coast starting, everything still as planned.</p><p>The ATV is tracking over SE Europe, then down across the Indian Ocean to Australia.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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bobw

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<p><font color="#c0c0c0">jonclarke</font><br /><font color="#c0c0c0">Nice shot of first stage dropping away</font></p><p>I wasn't sure either, but if we both thought it was real it probably was.&nbsp; I thought they had great TV of the boosters dropping off too.</p><p>ATV deployment in 45 minutes.&nbsp; I want to see TV of that too.&nbsp;</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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JonClarke

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<p>The commentary said that the booster shot was from an earlier mission.</p><p>I thought it was the 2nd send stage burn that was coming up in 45 minutes...</p><p>Jon</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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bobw

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<p>This has turned out to be really interesting launch coverage. Congrats to ESA.</p><p>A first edition hardcover copy of Jules Verne's <em>From the Earth to the Moon </em>is going up to the ISS as a gift for the crew.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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bobble_bob

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>jonclarkeNice shot of first stage dropping awayI wasn't sure either, but if we both thought it was real it probably was.&nbsp; I thought they had great TV of the boosters dropping off too.ATV deployment in 45 minutes.&nbsp; I want to see TV of that too.&nbsp;&nbsp; <br />Posted by bobw</DIV></p><p>The booster seperation was from a previous mission, so i assumed the first stage dropping away was too</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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3488

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'><font color="#ff0000">jonclarkeNice shot of first stage dropping awayI wasn't sure either, but if we both thought it was real it probably was.&nbsp; I thought they had great TV of the boosters dropping off too.ATV deployment in 45 minutes.&nbsp; I want to see TV of that too.&nbsp;&nbsp; <br />Posted by bobw</font></DIV></p><p>I have to get some shut eye now. Great launch though.</p><p>Updates from Spaceflightnow.com.</p><p><strong><font size="2" color="#000033">0428 GMT (11:28 p.m. EST Sat.)<br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br /></font></strong>Plus+25 minutes. The rocket is passing high over Europe now, with its track to continue above Asia and then head southeasterly. The next engine burn will occur once the vehicle passes over Australia.</p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0422 GMT (11:22 p.m. EST Sat.)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Plus+19 minutes. Altitude is 148.0 km, velocity is 7.56 km/sec. </p><p>Andrew Brown.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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JonClarke

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<p>Ah! http://www.esa.int/esaMI/ATV/SEMHL90DU8E_0.html</p><p>40 minutes after launch the 2nd stage fires for 40 seconds, circularising the orbit.&nbsp; Four minutes later the ATV separates/</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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JonClarke

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<p>It happens over Australia too.&nbsp; I think&nbsp;I will go outside and cheer it on!</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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bobw

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<p><font color="#c0c0c0">jonclarke</font><br /><font color="#c0c0c0">The commentary said that the booster shot was from an earlier mission.</font></p><p>Ah... I knew it wasn't an animation.&nbsp;</p><p>They need a 30 second burn to circularize the orbit, speed will be 8 km/sec, then second stage will separate.&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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JonClarke

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<p>Heading across Burma and then Thailand</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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bobw

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<font color="#c0c0c0">bobble_bob<br />The booster seperation was from a previous mission<br /><br /></font>The part that had me confused was "how do you see the cloud tops at night?"&nbsp; Well d'oh! <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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bobw

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Ooh... Those ESA guys on TV have some <font color="#c0c0c0"><font color="#000000"><span class="p">awesome</span></font>&nbsp;</font>&nbsp; spacecraft models. ISS, cutaway ATV wow! <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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JonClarke

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<p>I want those for my lounge!</p><p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
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bobw

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During docking the crew on the ISS has a transparent ruler overlay they put on the TV screen and read off the distance to the ATV by the diameter of the docking cone.&nbsp; It is a backup and verifier for the instrument readouts. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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bobw

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French guys kissing each other on TV.&nbsp; ATV must&nbsp; have separated from the last stage rocket. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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bobw

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ESA Director General Jean-Jacques Dordain, participating in press conference, said "We were worried about a few pieces of space debris and Mike Griffin said "Its OK, you can launch" and we could!"<br /><br />Got a laugh. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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3488

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<p><br />The most recent updates from Spaceflightnow.com.</p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2008<br />0655 GMT (1:55 a.m. EST)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />A first-of-a-kind robotic space transporter with a futuristic autopilot control system journeyed into orbit early Sunday, embarking on a mission to track down the international space station using the most advanced space technology ever developed in Europe. </p><p>The 42,700-pound cargo-laden spaceship, named Jules Verne for the visionary 19th century science fiction writer, was tucked inside Europe's workhorse Ariane 5 rocket for the dramatic blastoff. </p><p><strong><font size="2" color="#000033">0555 GMT (12:55 a.m. EST)</font></strong><br />"The launch of Jules Verne by Ariane 5 ES marks an important step on the way to ESA becoming an indispensable ISS partner with the ATV, the heaviest and most complex spacecraft ever built by ESA," said Jean-Jacques Dordain, ESA's Director General. </p><p>"This is the result of close cooperation between Member States, European industry, Arianespace, CNES, ESA staff and international partners. But the next steps of Jules Verne's mission are as important when it comes to attaining the objective of automatic rendezvous and docking with the ISS, controlled from the ATV Control Centre in Toulouse. In meeting that objective, we will have made great strides in consolidating the role of ESA in the future international exploration of the solar system." </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0552 GMT (12:52 a.m. EST)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />"Last month, with the docking of Columbus, Europe got its own flat in the ISS building, with the launch of the first ATV, we now have our own delivery truck," said Daniel Sacotte, ESA's Director for Human Spaceflight, Microgravity and Exploration. </p><p>"We have become co-owners of the ISS, now we are about to become fully-fledged partners in running it. With the ATV we will be servicing the ISS by delivering cargo qnd providing orbital reboost." </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0543 GMT (12:43 a.m. EST)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />"ATV is fully alive," says European astronaut Jean-Francois Clervoy. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0541 GMT (12:41 a.m. EST)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />The solar arrays have successfully deployed. All four wings unfolded their panels to power the Automated Transfer Vehicle during its life in space. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0535 GMT (12:35 a.m. EST)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />The solar array deployment sequence has begun. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0519 GMT (12:19 a.m. EST)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />The next critical milestone occurs about 20 minutes from now when the ATV's four power-generating solar arrays are extended. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0514 GMT (12:14 a.m. EST)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Jean-Yves Le Gall, the Arianespace CEO, says tonight's injection into orbit of ATV was perfect. This is the Ariane 5 rocket's 33rd successful mission. The heavy-lift vehicle's string of consecutive successful launches now stands at 23 dating back to 2002. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0509 GMT (12:09 a.m. EST)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Cheers of joy and relief have erupted in the Jupiter Control Center! The ATV has arrived in space for its maiden mission. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0509 GMT (12:09 a.m. EST)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Plus+66 minutes, 42 seconds. SPACECRAFT SEPARATION! Europe's new robotic space cargo freighter, the Automated Transfer Vehicle named Jules Verne, has been released from the Ariane 5 rocket's upper stage. The supply ship has embarked on its voyage to the International Space Station, with docking scheduled for April 3. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0509 GMT (12:09 a.m. EST)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Plus+66 minutes. Standing by for ATV to be cast free from its launcher. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0507 GMT (12:07 a.m. EST)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Plus+64 minutes, 30 seconds. Arianespace says the desired orbital velocity has been achieved by the Ariane 5 rocket. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0506 GMT (12:06 a.m. EST)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Plus+63 minutes, 30 seconds. Over the next few minutes, the upper stage will perform a pointing maneuver to provide antenna alignment between on the Automated Transfer Vehicle and NASA's orbiting Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System. </p><p>Separation of ATV from the Ariane 5 rocket is anticipated three minutes from now. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0506 GMT (12:06 a.m. EST)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Plus+63 minutes. Altitude is 270.5 km, velocity is 7.45 km/sec. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0505 GMT (12:05 a.m. EST)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Plus+62 minutes, 41 seconds. Shutdown 2. The Ariane 5 rocket's upper stage has accomplished its second firing for the launch of Jules Verne. This completes the powered phase of tonight's launch. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0505 GMT (12:05 a.m. EST)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Plus+62 minutes, 10 seconds. Ignition! The Ariane 5 rocket's upper stage is firing for a second time to deliver the Automated Transfer Vehicle to its injection orbit. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0504 GMT (12:04 a.m. EST)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Plus+61 minutes. Communications have resumed with the Ariane 5 rocket via the next downrange tracking station. Altitude is 269 km, velocity is 7.41 km/sec. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0503 GMT (12:03 a.m. EST)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Plus+60 minutes. Now one hour since the Ariane 5 rocket roared off its jungle launch pad in South America. The rocket is heading off the southeastern coast of Australia where the upper stage engine will fire to life again in about two minutes. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0458 GMT (11:58 p.m. EST Sat.)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Plus+55 minutes. Typical Ariane launches feature just one firing of the upper stage to propel satellites into orbit. But tonight's mission requires a two-step process to place the ATV into the desired orbit. And, in fact, the spent stage will perform a third burn later to deorbit itself. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0445 GMT (11:45 p.m. EST Sat.)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Plus+42 minutes. Ariane has about 20 minutes remaining in this quiet coast. </p><p><font face="VERDANA, ARIAL, HELVETICA, SANS-SERIF" size="-1" color="#000033"><strong>0433 GMT (11:33 p.m. EST Sat.)</strong></font><br /><img src="http://spaceflightnow.com/images/grafix/greypixel.gif" alt="" vspace="4" width="100%" height="1" /><br />Plus+30 minutes. During this phase of the flight, the Ariane rocket is out of ground tracking station coverage. Telemetry from the vehicle during the upcoming engine firing and deployment of ATV will resume when it flies within range of the Invercargill station in New Zealand. </p><p>Ariane also has available stations tonight in Dongara and Adelaide, Australia.</p><p>____________________________________________________________</p><p>The launch appears to have gione extremely well.</p><p>Andrew Brown.</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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erioladastra

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>&nbsp;IIRC, it's after the shuttle leaves, so the exact date and time would be hard to predict.Also again, from what I recall, it will dock and undock more than once. <br />Posted by meteorwayne</DIV></p><p>It was to be in early April after the Shuttle docks.&nbsp; However, it does not dock and undock more than once.&nbsp; It will do some rendezvous and verify it can abort.&nbsp; Therefore it will come in a couple of times.&nbsp; Perhaps that is what you are thinking of.</p><p>&nbsp;</p><p>I said was to be since that is all up in the air now.&nbsp; There is a Propulsion Drive Electronics failure.&nbsp; It is 1 of 4 units and controls 1/4 of the thrusters.&nbsp; That could mean a lot more prop usage for control but also they are concerned that another could fail for the same reason (looks like fuel/ox mismatch) and send the ATV into survival mode.&nbsp; All burns are canceled until further notice.</p>
 
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MeteorWayne

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<p><BR/>Replying to:<BR/><DIV CLASS='Discussion_PostQuote'>It was to be in early April after the Shuttle docks.&nbsp; However, it does not dock and undock more than once.&nbsp; It will do some rendezvous and verify it can abort.&nbsp; Therefore it will come in a couple of times.&nbsp; Perhaps that is what you are thinking of.&nbsp;I said was to be since that is all up in the air now.&nbsp; There is a Propulsion Drive Electronics failure.&nbsp; It is 1 of 4 units and controls 1/4 of the thrusters.&nbsp; That could mean a lot more prop usage for control but also they are concerned that another could fail for the same reason (looks like fuel/ox mismatch) and send the ATV into survival mode.&nbsp; All burns are canceled until further notice. <br />Posted by erioladastra</DIV></p><p>Glad to see you are back erioladastra!!</p><p>Not so happy to hear that news about Jules Verne :(</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
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Zipi

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<p>I tried to search some news articles about the electronic problems of ATV, but didn't yet find any. The problems are probably so fresh issue that they haven't been published yet. It is nice to see that this place is really up to date at all events.</p><p>Eventhough it is sad to see that our (europe's) first space craft of this size have such problems at its maiden flight. I really don't understand how fuel/ox mismatch can happen (if&nbsp;that is the root cause)... Haven't they tested the thrusters here at ground?</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> </div>
 
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