Black Holes

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jimijohnson

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if black holes are everywhere in the universe and are consuming everything in their paths. is it possible that black holes will eventually consume everthing including themselves to the point that one giant singulary is left?<br />think of a bowl of water. add oil and shake it up. if you leave it alone for long enough eventually the oil will collect together in the center. no big crunch needed.
 
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jimijohnson

Guest
even if they are messy eaters. at somepoint the matter "dropped to the floor" sort of speak will be picked up by another. will they not just continue to grow? or is there a limit to their growth?
 
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nacnud

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Black holes do slowly evaporated over time but I don't think that there is an upper limit to their size.<br /><br />The evaporation of a glactic black hole is likey to take a long time, billions if not trillions of years.
 
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Maddad

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nacnud<br />"<font color="yellow">The evaporation of a glactic black hole is likey to take a long time, billions if not trillions of years.</font><br /><br />Ten thousand billion billion billion billion trillion trillion trillion trillion trillion years. Give or take a couple.
 
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nexium

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The maddad number = a one followed by 100 zeros = 10e100 = one google years = a reasonable estimate for how long it takes very massive black holes to evaporate. This is offset by mass the black hole eats, so even longer is likely, since most black holes eat a ton or more per year. Conversely even longer is likely for most of the black holes to join into one humongous blackhole, unless the expansion of the Universe reverses = big crunch. Few experts today consider a big crunch likely. Neil
 
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Maddad

Guest
Black holes grow now, in the first few microinstants of the lifespan of the universe, because they exist in a matter rich environment. By the time the univere is a few dozen zeros older then there will be no significant matter for the black holes to consume. This means that their evaporation will not be offset for the truly vast majority of the google years.
 
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alokmohan

Guest
At that time thee may not be many stars to gobble up.The poor gobblin will starve.
 
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rickstine

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When a black hole sucks in light to feed itself.Light would escape,but what happens the the remanding amout of light that is traped in the black hole?When the black stops feeding and dies what happens to the light that is traped?I know that light is engery is neither created or distroyed?Can anyone help clear this up for me? <br /><br />
 
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kmarinas86

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Light is trapped in the curved fabric of space time and can't get out. As the photons enter a black hole their wavelength get increasingly small (its frequency approaches infinity). The light becomes even more powerful than gamma rays. I have no idea if the photon is transformed into some non-photon.
 
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zero_cool

Guest
i think the matter and light, gets spewed out somewhere else in the universe through a whitehole, if i am wrong, maybe the light gets turned into radiation...i dunno, im not to experienced on the subject
 
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taolung

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A black hole won't really die, but it is thought to slowly evaporate. This, I suppose, is what will ultimately happen to the photons and anything else it has swallowed.
 
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rickstine

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Black holes just become inactive until and srink to a small size ,until more engery needed to fuel them then they become active again.You people might know that the Milky WAy and all other galxies might all have a black holes ,ours is considered inactive.
 
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yevaud

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When a Singularity "evaporates," it releases quant in the form of photons (gamms, x-rays), that slowly carry away energy (energy=equivalent of mass here).<br /><br />Below a certain mass-limit, the Singularity will "detach" from our continuum. It will literally vanish, never to be seen again. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Differential Diagnosis:  </em>"<strong><em>I am both amused and annoyed that you think I should be less stubborn than you are</em></strong>."<br /> </p> </div>
 
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majornature

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Wow!!!!<br /><br />Black Holes rotate just like the galaxy! They have to in order to absorb light and other matter in itself!!!!! <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font size="2" color="#14ea50"><strong><font size="1">We are born.  We live.  We experiment.  We rot.  We die.  and the whole process starts all over again!  Imagine That!</font><br /><br /><br /><img id="6e5c6b4c-0657-47dd-9476-1fbb47938264" style="width:176px;height:247px" src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/14/4/6e5c6b4c-0657-47dd-9476-1fbb47938264.Large.jpg" alt="blog post photo" width="276" height="440" /><br /></strong></font> </div>
 
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kmarinas86

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<font color="yellow">Wow!!!! <br /><br />Black Holes rotate just like the galaxy!</font><br /><br />Correct.<br /><br /><font color="yellow">They have to in order to absorb light and other matter in itself!!!!!</font><br /><br />False. Rotation is not required for gravity to occur. The simple presence of mass causes positive space time curvature. Venus' equator for example rotates at the speed of a person walking:<br /><br />http://www.google.com/search?q=diameter+of+venus<br />Diameter of Venus: 12103.6km<br />Day on Venus: 243 Earth days<br />Spin: 49.81 km / Earth day<br />Spin: 2.1 km / hr<br /><br />Venus' gravity is as expected if gravity was a function of mainly mass - not spin. If the Earth did not spin, it would compress to higher density, and the surface gravity would be higher.
 
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beartooth

Guest
nd the surface gravity would be higher. <br /><br />making it m o r e d i ff i c u l t to t y pe t h i s
 
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nexium

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Energy to mass to energy to mass transformations are rare in Earth's lower atmosphere, but are likely common near and inside low mass black holes (if there are any low mass blackholes) Photons, quarks, subatomic particles, bits of matter etc likely are reflected by the debris, in curved paths, caused by the intense gravity and energy gradiant near the singularity = mass center of all sizes of black hole. Virtual particles are the only thing that escapes and most of these are recaptured by medium and high mass black holes. Large and medium black holes are expected to last a trillion times a trillion years 10E24 or longer. Neil
 
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petepan

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<font color="yellow">Below a certain mass-limit, the Singularity will "detach" from our continuum. It will literally vanish, never to be seen again. <br /></font><br /><br />Do you mean, that as it evaporates, it would eventually 'wink' out of existence? <i>( i could accept that)<br /></i><br /><br />I can't recall ever seeing that sort of explanation before?
 
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Saiph

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No.<br /><br />Our galaxies central BH is something like 40 thousand light years away. We don't really have any real plans to get to Pluto, a few light hours away. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p align="center"><font color="#c0c0c0"><br /></font></p><p align="center"><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">--------</font></em></font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">----</font></em></font><font color="#666699">SaiphMOD@gmail.com </font><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">-------------------</font></em></font></p><p><font color="#999999"><em><font size="1">"This is my Timey Wimey Detector.  Goes "bing" when there's stuff.  It also fries eggs at 30 paces, wether you want it to or not actually.  I've learned to stay away from hens: It's not pretty when they blow" -- </font></em></font><font size="1" color="#999999">The Tenth Doctor, "Blink"</font></p> </div>
 
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frobozz

Guest
The only explanation of this that I am aware of might be if the black hole were one end of a wormhole so to speak. The only problem is that the Wormholes theoretically "shut" almost as soon as they would open, creating a singularity. So I guess the question reduces to could one have a black hole which sucks in enough energy to keep it open for an appreciable period of time? At this point the question goes beyond my understanding of the matter, maybe someone else can take it further?
 
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majornature

Guest
At least I'm not the only one who knows about "whitehole" or anti-blackholes. <br /><br />What happens to trapped light energy as the blackhole evaporates?<br /><br />I think light energy that trapped inside the blackhole will eventually evaporate as the blackhole evaporates. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <font size="2" color="#14ea50"><strong><font size="1">We are born.  We live.  We experiment.  We rot.  We die.  and the whole process starts all over again!  Imagine That!</font><br /><br /><br /><img id="6e5c6b4c-0657-47dd-9476-1fbb47938264" style="width:176px;height:247px" src="http://sitelife.space.com/ver1.0/Content/images/store/14/4/6e5c6b4c-0657-47dd-9476-1fbb47938264.Large.jpg" alt="blog post photo" width="276" height="440" /><br /></strong></font> </div>
 
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frobozz

Guest
Well, a white hole in the strict terms of "Anti-Black" hole would violate the laws of thermodynamics unless it was the other end of a worm hole. I would suspect that when a worm hole "shuts" if you will, that what is left is a black hole at either end of it - one for each of the respective openings.
 
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kmarinas86

Guest
Time dilation occurs strongly at black holes.<br />So current blackholes are like snowballs and only in the infinite future will the new matter reach the center. So if you have two black holes passing by each other really close at near-relativistic speeds, and fast enough, could they shear one another? When they are closer together, there will be even more time dilation. What happens, if say, a black hole is elongated by 3 times?
 
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nexium

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Our present planitary probes need to do several sling shot manuvers = gravity assist manuvers to be going 100,000 kilometers per hour after they leave the gravity of the last planet, so it takes a billion hours to go one light year/ 30 trillion hours to go 30,000 light years. 30 trillion hours = 1.25 trillion days = 3.4 billion years.<br /> To get to the center of our galaxy in 100,000 years would require an average speed of about 0.3 c<br />Several types of engines may allow probes to reach one million kilometers per hour by 2050 if the optimism of the designers is reality.<br /> There is a very slight possibility that a several solar mass blackhole with negligible acreation disk will pass though our solar system in the next few centuries. Negligible accreation disk means, close to undetectable until about a light year away. A sling shot manuver around a blackhole like this might yeild 0.3c. Would we be told, if Earth was in grave danger from such a black hole? Neil
 
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contracommando

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<i>Are there currently any plans to send a satellite into our galaxy's black hole?”</i><br /><br />No, I don’t think so. By the time it got there the human race would probably be extinct. Besides, the limited technology we have today wouldn’t permit us to build a probe that could survive the decent into the black hole; it would be ripped apart before it crossed the event horrizion (although, I think the stress on the probe might be reduced the larger the black hole).<br /><br />I, if I’m not mistaken, believe that the CERN supercollider, when it comes on line, might try to create mini-black holes in the laboratory to study instead. That’s a better use of time and resources than sending a probe to a far away place.<br />
 
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