dark solar systems

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weeman

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I recently read an article about how brown dwarfs, otherwise known as 'failed stars', can still have orbiting planetesimals around them, which may form into planets. <br /><br />Is there any kind of celestial body out there that is less massive than a brown dwarf that could have its own "mini solar system"? <br /><br />In other words, are there any theoretical situations where a solar system does not give off any electromagnetic radiation, making it look more like dark matter? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><strong><font color="#ff0000">Techies: We do it in the dark. </font></strong></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>"Put your hand on a stove for a minute and it seems like an hour. Sit with that special girl for an hour and it seems like a minute. That's relativity.</strong><strong>" -Albert Einstein </strong></font></p> </div>
 
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Pooua

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Actually, Jupiter emits some radiation, more than it receives. Saturn might, also. I doubt we could observe it from outside our solar system, though.
 
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alokmohan

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These little known failed stars gets no attention of theoriticans.Not to talk of public.weeman you are doing good to me and brown dwarf.It is dark matter candidate.
 
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weeman

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<font color="yellow"> Actually, Jupiter emits some radiation, more than it receives. Saturn might, also. I doubt we could observe it from outside our solar system, though. </font><br /><br />Well, pretty much all forms of baryonic matter emit some form of electromagnetic energy. The only celestial mass that doesn't seem to emit any radiation is dark matter, hence its name. <br /><br />Now, I believe I am right when I say that dark matter is commonly theorized as a form of non-baryonic matter. Is this correct?<br /><br />I guess my question is this: Is it possible that very dark solar systems (although still radiating electromagnetic energy into space) are so far away that they are too faint to be seen with our modern day instruments? Thus being classified as dark matter? <br /><br />There would be a good chance that a solar system like this gives off some form of radiation, but because it's so faint, it gets scrambled and overpowered by stronger forms of radiation throughout the rest of the galaxy. <br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><strong><font color="#ff0000">Techies: We do it in the dark. </font></strong></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>"Put your hand on a stove for a minute and it seems like an hour. Sit with that special girl for an hour and it seems like a minute. That's relativity.</strong><strong>" -Albert Einstein </strong></font></p> </div>
 
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yevaud

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Certainly there's the reasonably well-accepted theory of "Free Planets" as well.<br /><br />One might also consider that exoplanets have been detected around Gliese 581, a red dwarf. This certainly suggests that even for low mass stellar objects, it is possible. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Differential Diagnosis:  </em>"<strong><em>I am both amused and annoyed that you think I should be less stubborn than you are</em></strong>."<br /> </p> </div>
 
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nexium

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If Jupiter and it's moons were 3 lightyears away from Earth and any other large object, we might detect it with an infrared telescope, if we knew where to look.<br />There are likely fewer than a trillion Jupiter to brown dwarf size objects roaming free in our galaxy and nearby. The upper mass limit of this group is likely less than the total mass of of the visable stars, perhaps hundreds of times less. Neil
 
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3488

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I think 'dark solar systems' exist. There is no real reason why a Jupiter, Saturn, <br />Uranus & Neptune like rogue planet, complete with moons should not exist in <br />intersteller space. In fact, I would be far more surprised if they don't exist.<br /><br />In fact there are probably rogue planets like Earth, Mars, & Mercury too, maybe also <br />with moons.<br /><br />It is genrally accepted that objects were ejected from our solar system, during the <br />formative years, when the newly formed planets jostled for positions. Some may even have <br />ended up in the Sun itself,<br />others along with asteroids & comets were thrown out of the solar system altogether.<br /><br />Pehjaps similar is happening around Vega, Fomalhaut, etc right now.<br /><br />I think intersteller space is littered with dark solar systems, rogue comets & asteroids.<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
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cnick

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I think that everyone who has posted a response to Weeman's question have actually misunderstood what he was asking. As I read it, he is asking the question in reference to dark matter, in other words, can ordinary (baryonic) matter that is not presently detectable (such as brown dwarfs, gas giants, terrestial planets, etc) account for the effects (the missing mass) that are presently being attributed to dark (hypothetical non-baryonic) matter?<br />Weeman, is that your question?<br />
 
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weeman

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Basically, yes. <br /><br />Although I do agree with Nexium; the fact that even if there are tons of rogue planets and systems out there, it's likely their total mass wouldn't come close to all of the visible matter in the galaxy. <br /><br />And if Nexium is correct, then he answered my question. Our current estimates of dark matter show that the majority of the mass of the galaxy exists within the halo that surrounds the galaxy, out beyond all the visible stars. <br /><br />So, this would throw out my idea that 'dark solar systems' are a piece of the puzzle. The only thing they could do is contribute (very slightly) to the total mass of dark matter in each galaxy. And it's very likely that, if dark solar systems are abundant, they account for less than 1% of all the mass of dark matter. <br /><br />This is where I begin to think that dark matter is a mysterious phenomenon that we may no nothing about. Isn't it possible that dark matter is the next great discovery? There may be something happening that we know nothing about, and it could be something that, when discovered, will change our ideas of physics forever! <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><strong><font color="#ff0000">Techies: We do it in the dark. </font></strong></p><p><font color="#0000ff"><strong>"Put your hand on a stove for a minute and it seems like an hour. Sit with that special girl for an hour and it seems like a minute. That's relativity.</strong><strong>" -Albert Einstein </strong></font></p> </div>
 
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qso1

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I would not be surprised to find such a system existing out there. They may be somewhat rare but not something I'd rule out. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong>My borrowed quote for the time being:</strong></p><p><em>There are three kinds of people in life. Those who make it happen, those who watch it happen...and those who do not know what happened.</em></p> </div>
 
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