Time splitting - "Atime"

Status
Not open for further replies.
S

science_man

Guest
According to Einstein, all people have their own relative time. <br /><br />If I was traveling 0.5c on my ufo orbiting the earth really fast, and my friend on earth was sitting down, our times would vary. <br /><br />Lets say person A is standing next to person B. Person A has a different time than person B (insignificantly small difference, but its still a "difference"). <br /><br />If person A is now holding one end of a rope while person B is holding the other end, their times are <b>still</b> different (plus or minus 0.000000000...............1 seconds).<br /> <br />You can think of person A as your left hand and person B as your right hand. Think of the rope as your chest connecting your arms. Thus your left arm has a different relative time than the right arm (even though the time change is insignificant).<br /><br />This can be magnified to fingers having different times, joints, cells, etc...<br /><br />How much can you break up time?<br /><br />Atoms were thought to be the smallest unit of matter. But what is the smallest unit of <b>time</b>?<br /><br />The smallest unit of time is a particle called "Atime" (I made this up...). <br /><font color="yellow"><br />"Atime" has a positive time subparticle and a negative time subparticle. The positive particle, can be called "positime", goes forwards in time while the negative particle, can be called "negatime", goes backwards in time.<br /></font><br /><br />When you stay still (relative to the ground), you have more positimes than negatimes.<br /><br />When you travel 0.5c, the number of negatimes increases.<br />Thus time gets slower.<br /><br />When you travel 1c (the speed of light), you now have equal number of positimes and negatimes.<br />Thus your time freezes.<br /><br />And when you travel more than 1c, you have more negatimes than positimes. <br />Thus you go back in time. <br /><br />Here is a diagram of what I'm talking about: http://b.imagehost.org/0129/A
 
S

SpeedFreek

Guest
<font color="yellow">How much can you break up time?<br /><br />Atoms were thought to be the smallest unit of matter. But what is the smallest unit of time?</font><br /><br />1 Planck unit of time.<br /><br /><br /><font color="yellow">So what do you guys think?</font><br /><br />I think you are, in your own way, describing the Lorentz Transformation as used in Special Relativity, but you will find you cannot travel faster than light and therefore cannot travel backwards in time.<br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#ff0000">_______________________________________________<br /></font><font size="2"><em>SpeedFreek</em></font> </p> </div>
 
L

larper

Guest
<blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>According to Einstein, all people have their own relative time. <br /><br />If I was traveling 0.5c on my ufo orbiting the earth really fast, and my friend on earth was sitting down, our times would vary. <br /><br />Lets say person A is standing next to person B. Person A has a different time than person B (insignificantly small difference, but its still a "difference"). <p><hr /></p></p></blockquote><br /><br />Nope. Sorry. Thanks for playing. Objects at rest relative to each other have, in your words, "the same time", not "different times." <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><strong><font color="#ff0000">Vote </font><font color="#3366ff">Libertarian</font></strong></p> </div>
 
S

science_man

Guest
Lets say "A" was traveling 0.99c for 2 years (relative to B) and B was staying still sitting on his chair.<br />Then A came back to visit B. They are both standing next to each other. Are you saying that they will have the same time?<br /><br />Because I think that is incorrect.
 
R

richalex

Guest
<blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr /><p>According to Einstein, all people have their own relative time.<p><hr /></p></p></blockquote>No, according to Einstein, each inertial frame of reference has its own time. That means that objects that are all at rest with respect to each other all share the same time. <br /><br />In the case of a man who flies away near light speed and then returns, the inertial reference frames were different during the trip, so their times will differ during the trip. Once they are back together in the same reference frame, their times will again be the same, from that point onward.
 
B

baulten

Guest
While this is an interesting theory (I'm fairly sure it has been brought up before; look up chronons, they're essentially your "atimes", quantums of time) I think that the general consensus is that time isn't governed by any quantum mechanics. Still, that could chance in the future.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY