Images of Mars Part IV, Victoria Crater/Home Plate and MRO

Status
Not open for further replies.
R

rlb2

Guest
<p style="margin-top:0in;margin-left:0in;margin-right:0in" class="MsoNormal">Here is a link to the missing images from the transfer over from the old message board for Images of Mars Part IV Victoria Crater/Home Plate and MRO</p><p style="margin-top:0in;margin-left:0in;margin-right:0in" class="MsoNormal">http://uplink.space.com/showflat.php?Cat=&Board=sciastro&Number=640056&page=1&view=collapsed&sb=5&o=0&fpart=all</p><p>Since I Started (Images of Mars) thread on this board just before the MER <br />rovers landed I thought I would start another one before the moderators locks <br />up the last one - Images of Mars Part III at <br /><br />http://uplink.space.com/showflat.php?Cat=&Board=sciastro&Number=347015&page=0&view=collapsed&sb=5&o=0&fpart= <br /><br />Here are some links to new Mars images and some of the old places that we have posted here. <br /><br />Images of Mars <br /><br />http://uplink.space.com/showflat.php?Cat=&Board=sciastro&Number=1358&page=18&view=collapsed&sb=5&o=0&fpart=1&vc=1 <br /><br />Images of Mars II <br /><br />http://uplink.space.com/showflat.php?Cat=&Board=sciastro&Number=137121&page=0&view=collapsed&sb=5&o=0&fpart=1&vc=1 <br /><br />Simulations Show Liquid Water Could Exist on Mars <br /><br />http://uplink.space.com/showflat.php?Cat=&Board=sciastro&Number=381751&page=0&view=collapsed&sb=5&o=0&fpart= <br /><br />It was a learned process that developed after the first original posting. <br />"Images of Mars" were lost-in- space during a large data loss at space.com <br />Message board. At its inception I had company posting images from some <br />other posters who also was developing the raw imag</p> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> Ron Bennett </div>
 
S

silylene old

Guest
rlb2: I always read this thread first when I log onto SDC. Keep the photos comin' ! <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature" align="center"><em><font color="#0000ff">- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -</font></em> </div><div class="Discussion_UserSignature" align="center"><font color="#0000ff"><em>I really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function.</em></font> </div> </div>
 
B

bonzelite

Guest
this is just stunningly beautiful. i'm making this one my desktop scene. i am totally geeking out on your mars photographs. they're pure mars porn.
 
R

rlb2

Guest
Thanks everyone.<br /><br />I'm kind of hooked on doing this.... <br /><br />1P220150540EL5M1 <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> Ron Bennett </div>
 
R

rlb2

Guest
2P220818780EL5M1 <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> Ron Bennett </div>
 
B

bonzelite

Guest
^^looks like a lot of volcanic rocks strewn about. black porous clods, as if they were molten and had lots of air bubbles in them.
 
B

bonzelite

Guest
also, the Victoria cliff walls have areas with a distinctive look of being very smoothly eroded, ie, very, very old erosion.
 
A

abq_farside

Guest
Keep up the nice work in '07 - I really enjoy the images.<br /><br />This one was interesting. You can see the rover tracks heading to the crater. <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p> </p><p><em><font size="1" color="#000080">Don't let who you are keep you from becoming who you want to be!</font></em></p> </div>
 
3

3488

Guest
Hi there. More excellent images from rlb2. Keep churning them out. Any further to getting them published? <br /><br />Has the MER project team seen them?? <br /><br />Hi bonzelite, yes the Columbia Hills along with the floor of Gusev Crater are littered with volcanic rocks.<br />The bubbles you noticed are called 'Vesicles'.<br />rlb2's images show them very well indeed. <br /><br />I would like to know the source of this volcanic material.<br /><br />Did lava ooze up through cracks in the floor of Gusev Crater, covering up what was the original floor (a potential lake bed).<br /><br />Or is the lava related to the huge sheild volcano Apollonaris Patera, sitting to the north of Gusev Crater??<br /><br />Are we any clearer to understanding what 'Home Plate' actually is yet?<br /><br />Hopefully Spirit will be able to pass to the north this time & view 'Home Plate' from the other direction.<br /><br />The MRO images taken with the HiRISE of the current locale of Spirit are intriguing. <br />Home Plate looks flat & there is a strange feature to the south west, an impact crater or a small volcanic cone??<br /><br />An interesting site indeed. I hope that Spirit can last long enough now to explore these features, <br />although I fear the end may be coming close, <br />seeing as 1,070 sols (980 sols past warranty) is coming up & there has been a dust storm, <br />causing power problems!!<br /><br />Andrew Brown. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080">"I suddenly noticed an anomaly to the left of Io, just off the rim of that world. It was extremely large with respect to the overall size of Io and crescent shaped. It seemed unbelievable that something that big had not been visible before".</font> <em><strong><font color="#000000">Linda Morabito </font></strong><font color="#800000">on discovering that the Jupiter moon Io was volcanically active. Friday 9th March 1979.</font></em></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://www.launchphotography.com/</font><br /><br /><font size="1" color="#000080">http://anthmartian.googlepages.com/thisislandearth</font></p><p><font size="1" color="#000080">http://web.me.com/meridianijournal</font></p> </div>
 
B

bonzelite

Guest
andrew, could the lava rocks have been ejected from very far away from their source? like in a catastrophic explosion?
 
S

silylene old

Guest
Here is a very strange spire on Mars, which I found in a post on UMSF board by James Clavin, which was found within a very recent HiRISE picture release. From the shadow length, and knowledge of the pixel size, James estimated the height of this spire is estimated to be 44m (143 feet).<br /><br />So my question is: what formed this spire? Its aspect ratio (height/base) seems to be about 3, which is very steep. Among the causes of such steep spires I can think of:<br />1. volcanic cone - seems too steep for that.<br />2. volcanic pipe - the terrain around it has eroded away, leaving the more resistant central core. Maybe.<br />3. water erosion of a plateau, like the hoodoos of Bryce Canyon. Doesn't look like this though.<br />4. wind erosion of a plateau. Doesn't look like this though.<br />5. Remnant of an extinct undersea "smoker" vent, and the sea has dried up. (my idea, probably nutty)<br /><br />Any ideas? <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature" align="center"><em><font color="#0000ff">- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -</font></em> </div><div class="Discussion_UserSignature" align="center"><font color="#0000ff"><em>I really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function.</em></font> </div> </div>
 
M

MeteorWayne

Guest
Do you know if the image has been vertically stretched?<br />Most are.<br />The image hasn't been approved yet, so I'm pre-asking here?<br /><br />Looking athe the original image (from the link, which hasn't gotten to the original original image), it looks like a volcanic (either magma or CO2/H2)) cone. I don't think "spire" is the right word. A spire is a "tall, acutely pointed" object.<br />It looks more conic to me, and again we don't know how the image was manipulated.<br /><br />If you have a link to the original image, <i> with information about the image processing </i> I'd like to see it! <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font color="#000080"><em><font color="#000000">But the Krell forgot one thing John. Monsters. Monsters from the Id.</font></em> </font></p><p><font color="#000080">I really, really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function</font><font color="#000080"> </font></p> </div>
 
T

telfrow

Guest
Here's a crop from the link provided of the cone/spire, adjusted slightly for contrast. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <strong><font color="#3366ff">Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will to strive, to seek, to find and not to yeild.</font> - <font color="#3366ff"><em>Tennyson</em></font></strong> </div>
 
S

silylene old

Guest
The picture is from the HiRISE Becquerel crater image of Dec 6 (release 3), a bit 10:00PM position off center. No it isn't stretched vertically. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature" align="center"><em><font color="#0000ff">- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -</font></em> </div><div class="Discussion_UserSignature" align="center"><font color="#0000ff"><em>I really, really, really miss the "first unread post" function.</em></font> </div> </div>
 
J

JonClarke

Guest
Extraordinary photo. I would go for th eroded remnant myself on gut instict, but other possibilities can't be ruled out.<br /><br />I really like the brecciation of the bedrock, this is like ther fracturing we see at Meridiani. Maybe all Martian sediments look like this near the surface.<br /><br />Jon <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
R

robnissen

Guest
This is PROOF that Martians exist. This is ACTUALLY a LIFE SIZE replica of a Martian uh . . . private parts. (Which BTW, Martian Women are VERY UNIMPRESSED by Earth men.)<br /><br />.<br />.<br />.<br /> j/k btw <img src="/images/icons/smile.gif" />.
 
R

rlb2

Guest
<font color="orange">bonzelite- looks like a lot of volcanic rocks strewn about. black porous clods, as if they were molten and had lots of air bubbles in them.<font color="white"><br /><br />The key word here is "volcanic' that after MRO took another look at homeplate <br />the rover team started salivacating over the thought of what they may have <br />missed so they are going back for a closer look....<br /><br />_____________________________________________________ <br /><br /><font color="orange">abq_farside--Keep up the nice work in '07 - I really enjoy the images.<font color="white"><br /><br />Thanks everyone for your support.<br /><br />______________________________________________________<br /><br />Here is an image from MRO top left hand corner that I re-arranged the<br />molecules to produce something that would look true color like.<br /><br />The original is over 10,000 pixel long.<br /><br />164841main_pia09097</font></font></font></font> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> Ron Bennett </div>
 
R

rlb2

Guest
Here are some larger parts from the above image. Note these aren't even to size;<br />I had to reduce the size and the quality to fit within the 100,000k range. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> Ron Bennett </div>
 
R

rlb2

Guest
More small sections from the larger processed image above. <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> Ron Bennett </div>
 
R

rlb2

Guest
<font color="orange">Here is a very strange spire on Mars, which I found in a post on UMSF board by James Clavin<font color="white"><br /><br />Did it come from this section of the full resolution image I colorized below???</font></font> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> Ron Bennett </div>
 
J

JonClarke

Guest
The image 164841main_pia09097 is absolutely gob-smacking in detail. Many of the layers consist of cross-bedded sand and are capped by brecciated horizons that can only be old erosion surfaces. Waht's the scale? And where is the image from?<br /><br />Jon <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
R

rlb2

Guest
<font color="orange">The image 164841main_pia09097 is absolutely gob-smacking in detail. <br />Many of the layers consist of cross-bedded sand and are capped by brecciated <br />horizons that can only be old erosion surfaces. Waht's the scale? And where <br />is the image from? <font color="white"><br /><br />A lot of cross beddings, the image is from the North Polar region you can read <br />the full caption and view the larger image here:<br /><br />http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/MRO/multimedia/pia09097.html <br /><br /><font color="yellow">shows the north polar layered deposits at top and darker materials at <br />bottom, exposed in a scarp at the head of Chasma Boreale, a large canyon eroded <br />into the layered deposits. <br /><br />The polar layered deposits appear red because of dust mixed within them, but<br />are ice-rich as indicated by previous observations. Water ice in the layered <br />deposits is probably responsible for the pattern of fractures seen near the <br />top of the scarp. The darker material below the layered deposits may <br />have been deposited as sand dunes, as indicated by the crossbedding <br />(truncation of curved lines) seen near the middle of the scarp. It appears <br />that brighter, ice-rich layers were deposited between the dark dunes in places. <br />Exposures such as these are useful in understanding recent climate variations <br />that are likely recorded in the polar layered deposits.<font color="white"> <br /><br />Quite remarkable isn't it? I don't know what the scale is without doing some <br />digging, the images above are from a image 4000 X 10119 lines and the original <br />image is not to size, even the smaller cropped sections I couldn't fit it in on this thread.<br /><br /><br /></font></font></font></font> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> Ron Bennett </div>
 
J

JonClarke

Guest
Do lines = pixels? If so we could assume that 1 pixel = 30 cm as a rough guide.<br /><br />BTW, the thread title suggests MER images, but this is a MRO image. Do you want edit the title accordingly to avoid confusion?<br /><br />Jon <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><em>Whether we become a multi-planet species with unlimited horizons, or are forever confined to Earth will be decided in the twenty-first century amid the vast plains, rugged canyons and lofty mountains of Mars</em>  Arthur Clarke</p> </div>
 
R

rlb2

Guest
<font color="orange">Do you want edit the title accordingly to avoid confusion? <font color="white"><br /><br />Thanks done that as requested.<br /><br /><font color="orange">Do lines = pixels? If so we could assume that 1 pixel = 30 cm as a rough guide.<font color="white"><br /><br />I am curios too; as soon as someone finds the correct scale for the above <br />linked image please enlighten us. I don't know what the Pixel/ line thing would <br />refer to so I can't give you a good approximation. I would think, like you <br />referred to, lines would be 1 pixel wide...<br /><br />MRO altitude changes as it orbits Mars and so does the <br />surface elevation as a result the scale would change depending on the <br />instruments so the best way is to count on them in getting the scale per <br />standard pixel etc. of each image recorded somewhere, for MRO I don't know <br />where to look for the scale. In fact the scale would change minutely from the <br />top of the canyon to the bottom of the canyon depending on elevation. MRO <br />is in a lower orbit than the rest of the alien terrestrial spacecraft orbiting Mars. <br /><br />Someday we will have a GPS satellites system orbiting Mars so anyone at home <br />(Earth) can tell its coordinates and elevation in real light delayed Martian <br />time. The way things are going that will probably happen hundreds of years <br />before we land any human on Mars..….<br /></font></font></font></font> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> Ron Bennett </div>
 
B

brellis

Guest
<font color="yellow">do you want to edit the title?</font><br /><br />"Martian Girls in Pajamas Wrestling with nude Grizzly/Pizzly's" - that'll grab some attention, lol.<br /><br />My #1 question: can MRO snap rapid-fire pics of gullies during one pass? Think of the knowledge we could glean from a realtime image sequence of an outflow!<br /> <div class="Discussion_UserSignature"> <p><font size="2" color="#ff0000"><em><strong>I'm a recovering optimist - things could be better.</strong></em></font> </p> </div>
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY